Federal

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US - Endangered Species Act - Subpart C. Endangered Wildlife


These Endangered Species Act regulations describe illegal actions with respect to endangered wildlife, including prohibited taking, transporting, and selling among other things.  They also outline exceptions to the taking prohibition including those related to scientific purposes, enhancement of a species propagation, and economic hardship permits.

US - Endangered Species Act - Subpart E - Similarity of Appearance


This Subpart of the ESA regulations allows the designation of a species, which is not Endangered or Threatened but closely resembles an Endangered or Threatened species, as a "de facto" Endangered or Threatened species if the director of the USFWS determines the listing is necessary.  Factors that influence this decision include the degree of difficulty enforcement personnel would have in distinguishing the species from an Endangered or Threatened species (including those cases where the criteria for recognition of a species are based on geographical boundaries); the additional threat posed to the Endangered or Threatened species by the loss of control occasioned because of the similarity of appearance; and the probability that so designating a similar species will substantially facilitate enforcement and further the purposes and policy of the Act.

US - Endangered Species Act - Subpart H - Experimental Populations


These ESA (Endangered Species Act) regulations relate to "experimental populations," an introduced and/or designated population that has been so designated in accordance with the procedures of this subpart but only when, and at such times as the population is wholly separate geographically from nonexperimental populations of the same species.  The Secretary may designate as an experimental population a population of endangered or threatened species that has been or will be released into suitable natural habitat outside the species' current natural range (but within its probable historic range, absent a finding by the Director in the extreme case that the primary habitat of the species has been unsuitably and irreversibly altered or destroyed).  Any population determined by the Secretary to be an experimental population shall be treated as if it were listed as a threatened species for purposes of establishing protective regulations under section 4(d) of the Act with respect to such population.

US - Endangered Species Act - Subpart J. Manatee Protection Areas


These ESA (Endangered Species Act) regulations provide a means for establishing manatee protection areas without waters under the jurisdiction of the United States.  This subpart applies to the West Indian manatee (Trichechus manatus), also known as the Florida manatee and as the sea cow.  Under the regulations, the Director may establish manatee protection areas whenever there is substantial evidence showing such establishment is necessary to prevent the taking of one or more manatees.  It is unlawful for any person to engage in any waterborne activity within a manatee sanctuary.  Permits under this subpart shall be issued only for scientific purposes or for the enhancement of propagation or survival.

US - Endangered Species Act Regulations - Subpart A - Introduction


These regulations for the Endangered Species Act (ESA) cover the introductory materials, including the purpose, definitions, and scope of the administrative regulations.  They also include regulations related to "pre-Act" wildlife and examples of such possession as well as provisions for Native Alaskans.

US - Endangered Species Act Regulations - Subpart I - Interagency Cooperation


This section of the ESA regulations provides that all federal agencies must insure that any action authorized, funded, or carried out by them is not likely to result in the destruction or adverse modification of the constituent elements essential to the conservation of the listed species within these defined Critical Habitats. It also gives greater definition of what constitutes "Critical Habitat" and how agencies and interested parties can locate the boundaries of specified critical habitats.

US - Environmental - National Environmental Policy Act of 1969



The National Environmental Policy Act (NEPA) requires federal agencies to integrate environmental values into their decision making processes by considering the environmental impacts of their proposed actions and reasonable alternatives to those actions. To meet this requirement, federal agencies prepare a detailed statement known as an Environmental Impact Statement (EIS). EPA reviews and comments on EISs prepared by other federal agencies, maintains a national filing system for all EISs, and assures that its own actions comply with NEPA.

US - Exotic Birds - Wild Exotic Bird Conservation Act


The Wild Exotic Bird Conservation Act addresses the population threat to non-indigenous wild birds due to the demand the from U.S. as the number one importer of exotic birds (e.g., the "pet" bird trade).  Exceptions under the statute include qualified breeding facilities, scientific or zoological study, and people returning the U.S. who have been out of the country for more than a year (limited to two birds).

US - Exotic Pets - Injurious Wildlife Species; Listing the Boa Constrictor, Four Python Species, and Four Anaconda Species as In


The U.S. Fish and Wildlife Service (Service) proposes to amend its regulations to add Indian python (Python molurus, including Burmese python Python molurus bivittatus), reticulated python (Broghammerus reticulatus or Python reticulatus), Northern African python (Python sebae), Southern African python (Python natalensis), boa constrictor (Boa constrictor), yellow anaconda (Eunectes notaeus), DeSchauensee's anaconda (Eunectes deschauenseei), green anaconda (Eunectes murinus), and Beni anaconda (Eunectes beniensis) to the list of injurious reptiles. This listing would prohibit the importation of any live animal, gamete, viable egg, or hybrid of these nine constrictor snakes into the United States, except as specifically authorized.

US - Fisheries - Packwood-Magnuson Amendment


Aim of statute is the development of United States' controlled fishing conservation and management program designed to prevent overfishing and to rebuild depleted stock.

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