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Titlesort descending Citation Alternate Citation Summary Type
MS - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes Miss. Code Ann. § 97-41-1 - 23; Miss. Code Ann. § 97-29-59 MS ST § 97-41-1 to 97-41-23; MS ST § 97-29-59

This section constitutes Mississippi's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions, which were recently amended in 2011. The pertinent anti-cruelty law, § 97-41-1, states that any person who intentionally or with criminal negligence overrides, overdrives, overloads, tortures, torments, unjustifiably injures, deprives of necessary sustenance, food, or drink, cruelly beats, or needlessly mutilates any living creature , is guilty of a misdemeanor. The cat and dog cruelty provision, § 97-41-16, was significantly amended in 2011. This section, known as the "Mississippi Dog and Cat Pet Protection Law of 2011," makes it a misdemeanor to intentionally or with criminal negligence wound, deprive of adequate food, water, or shelter, or carry or confine in a cruel manner, any domesticated cat or dog. Aggravated cruelty occurs when a person with malice intentionally tortures, mutilates, maims, burns, starves or disfigures any domesticated dog or cat.

Statute
MS - Endangered Species - Chapter 5. Fish, Game and Bird Protection and Refuges. Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act Miss. Code Ann. § 49-5-101 to 49-5-119 MS ST §§ 49-5-101 to 49-5-119

These Mississippi statutes provide the short title for the Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation Act, the definitions for the Act, the legislative findings, and the associated regulations of the Act.  Violations under the Act may incur up to a $1,000 fine and/or one-year term of imprisonment as well as equipment confiscation.

Statute
MS - Exotic pet - Chapter 8. Importation, Sale and Possession of Inherently Dangerous Wild Animals. Miss. Code Ann. § 49-8-1 to 49-8-19 MS ST § 49-8-1 to 49-8-19

This Mississippi chapter states that it is in the public interest to ensure the public health, safety and welfare by strictly regulating the importation, sale, transfer and possession of those wild animals inherently dangerous to humans. Several species are listed under this section as inherently dangerous to humans, including non-human primates, wolves, bears, hyenas, big cats, and hippopotamus, among others. It is unlawful for a person to import, transfer, sell, purchase or possess any wild animal classified inherently dangerous by law or regulation unless that person holds a permit. Those persons who were in possession of such animals on or before May 1, 1997 were able to continue possession provided that they complied with the permit process. Prior to the issuance of a permit, the applicant must have provided proof of liability insurance in the amount of $100,000.00 for each wild animal up to a maximum of $1,000,000.00.

Statute