Full Title Name:  Symposium: Confronting Barriers To The Courtroom For Animal Advocates - Legal Standing For Animals And Advocates

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David Cassuto, Jonathan Loworn, and Katherine Meyer Place of Publication:  Lewis & Clark Law School Publish Year:  2006 Primary Citation:  13 Animal Law 61 (2006) 0
Summary:

For animal advocates, one of the most significant barriers to the courtroom is standing. In order to litigate on behalf of an animal’s interests in federal court, the advocate must first establish standing by meeting three requirements: (1) the plaintiff must have suffered an injury in fact, (2) the injury must be causally connected to the act about which the plaintiff is complaining, and (3) the court must be able to redress the injury. When it comes to non-human animals, how does an advocate demonstrate an injury to establish standing? In this panel, experts in animal litigation discuss the concept of establishing legal standing for animals and animal advocates; the panelists’ own experiences, including specific cases and creative methods used; and the future of legal standing for animals.

Documents:  lralvol13_1_p61.pdf

 

SYMPOSIUM: CONFRONTING BARRIERS TO THE COURTROOM FOR ANIMAL ADVOCATES 

Sponsored by the Student Animal Legal Defense Fund of New York University School of Law

On April 14, 2006, the Student Animal Legal Defense Fund of New York University School of Law hosted a symposium on how to overcome some common courtroom barriers faced by animal advocates. Panelists discussed cultural and legal transitions, legal standing for nonhuman animals, and potential causes of action. Symposium participants included prominent attorneys, authors, philosophers, and professors specializing in the field of animal protection law. The following articles have been adapted from transcripts of the symposium.

LEGAL STANDING FOR ANIMALS AND ADVOCATES

PANELISTS: David Cassuto, Jonathan Lovvorn, and Katherine Meyer

MODERATOR: Joyce Tischler

For animal advocates, one of the most significant barriers to the courtroom is standing. In order to litigate on behalf of an animal’s interests in federal court, the advocate must first establish standing by meeting three requirements: (1) the plaintiff must have suffered an injury in fact, (2) the injury must be causally connected to the act about which the plaintiff is complaining, and (3) the court must be able to redress the injury. When it comes to non-human animals, how does an advocate demonstrate an injury to establish standing? In this panel, experts in animal litigation discuss the concept of establishing legal standing for animals and animal advocates; the panelists’ own experiences, including specific cases and creative methods used; and the future of legal standing for animals.

 

 

See Introduction

See Linking Cultural and Legal Transitions discussion

See Animal Advocacy discussion

See Conclusion

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