Full Title Name:  Laws and Regulations Concerning Equine Transport

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Rebecca F. Wisch Place of Publication:  Michigan State University College of Law Publish Year:  2014 Primary Citation:  Animal Legal & Historical Center Country of Origin:  United States
Summary:

This document provides an overview of the 11 states that have laws or regulations concerning the transportation of horses that specifically prohibit the use of double-deck trailers.

According to the advocacy group the Equine Protection Network (EPN), accidents involving double-deck horse trailers in three states in recent years resulted in the deaths of numerous horses.  These advocates contend that the use of double-deck trailers is dangerous because the trailers are not "designed, safety tested, or manufactured for horses." There is a particular danger of the floor collapsing on either the upper or lower deck causing death or injury to the horses being transported. (See the EPN at http://equineprotectionnetwork.com/transport/transportindex.htmil

The table provides links the laws concerning the transport of horses in vehicles.  In 2008, Rhode Island became the sixth state to ban the use of double-deck trailers to transport horses by law. Maryland, Massachusetts, New York, Pennsylvania, and Vermont had previously banned the use of double-deck (or "possum belly") trailers by statute. Arizona and California ban the use of double-deck trailers for the transportation of horses to slaughtering establishments. 

Penalties for violating laws prohibiting the use of double-deck trailers varies by state. For example, in Maryland, a first violation results in a $500 penalty per horse; subsequent violations result in a $1000 penalty per horse. Likewise, Rhode Island also provides for a first penalty of at least $500 per horse, and at least a $1,000 for each subsequent violation. Under Pennsylvania's law enacted in 2001, each violation constitutes a misdemeanor in the third degree for each horse transported in such fashion. 

  

Arizona

 

California

 

Connecticut

 

Massachusetts

 

Maryland

 

Minnesota

 

New York

 

Pennsylvania

 

Rhode Island

 

Vermont

 

Virginia

 

 

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