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Oregon

West's Oregon Revised Statutes Annotated. Title 16. Crimes and Punishments. Chapter 167. Offenses Against Public Health, Decency and Animals. Offenses Against Animals.

Statute Details
Printable Version
Citation: O. R. S. 167.310 - 390

Citation: OR ST 167.310 - 390


Last Checked by Web Center Staff: 01/2014

Summary:   These Oregon statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty laws.  "Animal" means any nonhuman mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian or fish.  Two interesting features are contained in Oregon law.  First, it should be noted that the term "assault," which is generally associated with human crimes, is used to define certain crimes against animals.  Second, animal abuse may be elevated to a felony offense if the act was committed directly in front of a minor child or if the perpetrator was previously convicted of domestic violence.  There are two levels of animal abuse; animal abuse in the second degree occurs when person intentionally, knowingly or recklessly causes physical injury to an animal.and is a Class B misdemeanor.  The more severe offense of animal abuse in the first degree occurs if a person intentionally, knowingly or recklessly causes serious physical injury to an animal, or cruelly causes the death of an animal.  Animal abuse in the first degree is a Class A misdemeanor, but will be a Class C felony if the person committing the animal abuse has previously been convicted of two or more of the listed offenses (e.g., aggravated animal abuse and offenses involving domestic violence) or the person knowingly commits the animal abuse in the immediate presence of a minor child.  A person commits the crime of aggravated animal abuse in the first degree if the person maliciously kills an animal or intentionally or knowingly tortures an animal.  Aggravated animal abuse in the first degree is a Class C felony.  Animal neglect is also a misdemeanor categorized into first and second degree based on whether the animal suffers serious injury or dies as a result.  Oregon also prohibits ownership of domestic animals for five years if convicted of the misdemeanor animal abuse offenses, or fifteen years if the perpetrator commits felony animal abuse.  The section also prohibits animal fighting, interference with livestock operations, and the sale of dog or cat fur.


Statute in Full:

Links on other pages

Arrest warrants in cruelty matters

Definitions

167.310. Definitions

Interference with Animal Research

167.312. Research and animal interference

Animal Abuse Provisions

167.315. Animal abuse in the second degree

167.320. Animal abuse in the first degree

167.322. Aggravated animal abuse in the first degree

Animal Neglect Provisions

167.325. Animal neglect in the second degree

167.330. Animal neglect in the first degree

167.332. Possession of domestic animals by violator

Sexual Assault of Animal

167.333. Sexual assault of animal

167.334. Evaluation of person convicted of violating ORS 167.333

Exemptions

167.335. Exemption from ORS 167.315 to 167.333

Law Enforcement Animal Provisions

167.337. Interfering with law enforcement animal

167.339. Assault of a law enforcement animal

Abandonment of Animal

167.340. Animal abandonment

Seizure and Impoundment Provisions

167.345. Search and seizure; impoundment; liability

167.347. Forfeiture of impounded animal

167.348. Placement of forfeited animal; preference

167.349. Encouraging animal abuse

167.350. Forfeiture of rights in mistreated animal; costs; penalty

Nonambulatory Livestock Provisions

167.351. Definitions

Service Animal Provisions

167.352. Interfering with assistance, search and rescue or therapy animal

Animal Fighting Provisions

167.355. Involvement in animal fighting

167.360. Definitions

167.365. Dogfighting

167.370. Participation in dogfighting

167.372. Possessing dogfighting paraphernalia

167.375. Seizure of fighting dogs

Dog Breeding Provisions

167.374. Breeding dogs; possession; records

167.376. Breeding dogs; standard of care

167.379.  Repealed by Laws 2005, c. 830, § 48, eff. Sept. 2, 2005.

167.380. Laws 1987, c. 249, § 5; repealed by Laws 2001, c. 666, § 56

Livestock Stealing/Interference Provisions

167.385. Unauthorized use of livestock animal

167.387. Definitions

167.388. Interference with livestock production

Dog and Cat Fur Prohibition

167.390. Commerce in fur of domestic cats and dogs

 

 

167.310. Definitions

<Text subject to final change by the Oregon Office of the Legislative Counsel.>

As used in ORS 167.310 to 167.351:

(1) “Adequate bedding” means bedding of sufficient quantity and quality to permit a domestic animal to remain dry and reasonably clean and maintain a normal body temperature.

(2)(a) “Adequate shelter” includes a barn, dog house or other enclosed structure sufficient to protect a domestic animal from wind, rain, snow or sun, that has adequate bedding to protect against cold and dampness and that is maintained to protect the domestic animal from weather and physical injury.

(b) “Adequate shelter” does not include:

(A) Crawl spaces under buildings or parts of buildings, such as steps, decks or stoops;

(B) The space under a vehicle;

(C) The inside of a vehicle if the domestic animal is kept in the vehicle in a manner or for a length of time that is likely to be detrimental to the domestic animal's health or safety;

(D) Shelters made from cardboard or other materials that are easily degraded by the elements;

(E) Animal carriers or crates that are designed to provide temporary housing;

(F) Shelters with wire or chain-link floors, unless the domestic animal is a bird; or

(G) Shelters surrounded by waste, debris, obstructions or impediments that could adversely affect an animal's health.

(3) “Animal” means any nonhuman mammal, bird, reptile, amphibian or fish.

(4) “Domestic animal” means an animal, other than livestock or equines, that is owned or possessed by a person.

(5) “Equine” means a horse, pony, donkey, mule, hinny, zebra or a hybrid of any of these animals.

(6) “Good animal husbandry” includes, but is not limited to, the dehorning of cattle, the docking of horses, sheep or swine, and the castration or neutering of livestock, according to accepted practices of veterinary medicine or animal husbandry.

(7) “Law enforcement animal” means a dog or horse used in law enforcement work under the control of a corrections officer, parole and probation officer, police officer or youth correction officer, as those terms are defined in ORS 181.610, who has successfully completed at least 360 hours of training in the care and use of a law enforcement animal, or who has passed the demonstration of minimum standards established by the Oregon Police Canine Association or other accredited and recognized animal handling organization.

(8) “Livestock” has the meaning provided in ORS 609.125.

(9) “Minimum care” means care sufficient to preserve the health and well-being of an animal and, except for emergencies or circumstances beyond the reasonable control of the owner, includes, but is not limited to, the following requirements:

(a) Food of sufficient quantity and quality to allow for normal growth or maintenance of body weight.

(b) Open or adequate access to potable water in sufficient quantity to satisfy the animal's needs. Access to snow or ice is not adequate access to potable water.

(c) For a domestic animal other than a dog engaged in herding or protecting livestock, access to adequate shelter.

(d) Veterinary care deemed necessary by a reasonably prudent person to relieve distress from injury, neglect or disease.

(e) For a domestic animal, continuous access to an area:

(A) With adequate space for exercise necessary for the health of the animal;

(B) With air temperature suitable for the animal; and

(C) Kept reasonably clean and free from excess waste or other contaminants that could affect the animal's health.

(f) For a livestock animal that cannot walk or stand without assistance:

(A) Humane euthanasia; or

(B) The provision of immediate and ongoing care to restore the animal to an ambulatory state.

(10) “Physical injury” means physical trauma, impairment of physical condition or substantial pain.

(11) “Physical trauma” means fractures, cuts, punctures, bruises, burns or other wounds.

(12) “Possess” has the meaning provided in ORS 161.015.

(13) “Serious physical injury” means physical injury that creates a substantial risk of death or that causes protracted disfigurement, protracted impairment of health or protracted loss or impairment of the function of a limb or bodily organ.

(14)(a) “Tethering” means to restrain a domestic animal by tying the domestic animal to any object or structure by any means.

(b) “Tethering” does not include using a handheld leash for the purpose of walking a domestic animal.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 1985, c. 662, § 1; Laws 1995, c. 663, § 3; Laws 1999, c. 756, § 13; Laws 2001, c. 926, § 7; Laws 2003, c. 543, § 6; Laws 2003, c. 549, § 1; Laws 2005, c. 264, § 18, eff. June 20, 2005; Laws 2009, c. 233, § 2, eff. Jan. 1, 2010; Laws 2013, c. 382, § 3, eff. Jan. 1, 2014.

 

167.312. Research and animal interference

(1) A person commits the crime of research and animal interference if the person:

(a) With the intent to interfere with research, releases, steals or otherwise causes the death, injury or loss of any animal at or from an animal research facility.

(b) With the intent to interfere with research, damages, vandalizes or steals any property in or on an animal research facility.

(c) With the intent to interfere with research, obtains access to an animal research facility to perform acts not authorized by that facility.

(d) Obtains or exerts unauthorized control over records, data, materials, equipment or animals of any animal research facility with the intent to interfere with research by concealing, abandoning or destroying such records, data, materials, equipment or animals.

(e) With the intent to interfere with research, possesses or uses equipment or animals that the person reasonably believes have been obtained by theft or deception from an animal research facility or without the authorization of an animal research facility.

(2) For the purposes of this section, "animal research facility" means any facility engaging in legal scientific research or teaching involving the use of animals.

(3) Research and animal interference is a:

(a) Class C felony if damage to the animal research facility is $2,500 or more; or

(b) Class A misdemeanor if there is no damage to the facility or if damage to the animal research facility is less than $2,500.

(4) Determination of damages to an animal research facility shall be made by the court. In making its determination, the court shall consider the reasonable costs of:

(a) Replacing lost, injured or destroyed animals;

(b) Restoring the animal research facility to the approximate condition of the facility before the damage occurred; and

(c) Replacing damaged or missing records, data, material or equipment.

(5) In addition to any other penalty imposed for violation of this section, a person convicted of such violation is liable:

(a) To the owner of the animal for damages, including the costs of restoring the animal to confinement and to its health condition prior to commission of the acts constituting the violation;

(b) For damages to real and personal property caused by acts constituting the violation; and

(c) For the costs of repeating an experiment, including the replacement of the animals, labor and materials, if acts constituting the violation cause the failure of an experiment.

Laws 1991, c. 843, § 2; Laws 2001, c. 147, § 2; Laws 2001, c. 554, § 1.

 

167.315. Animal abuse in the second degree

(1) A person commits the crime of animal abuse in the second degree if, except as otherwise authorized by law, the person intentionally, knowingly or recklessly causes physical injury to an animal.

(2) Any practice of good animal husbandry is not a violation of this section.

(3) Animal abuse in the second degree is a Class B misdemeanor.

Laws 1985, c. 662, § 2.

 

167.320. Animal abuse in the first degree

<Text subject to final change by the Oregon Office of the Legislative Counsel.>

(1) A person commits the crime of animal abuse in the first degree if, except as otherwise authorized by law, the person intentionally, knowingly or recklessly:

(a) Causes serious physical injury to an animal; or

(b) Cruelly causes the death of an animal.

(2) Any practice of good animal husbandry is not a violation of this section.

(3) Animal abuse in the first degree is a Class A misdemeanor.

(4) Notwithstanding subsection (3) of this section, animal abuse in the first degree is a Class C felony if:

(a) The person committing the animal abuse has previously been convicted of one or more of the following offenses:

(A) Any offense under ORS 163.160, 163.165, 163.175, 163.185 or 163.187 or the equivalent laws of another jurisdiction, if the offense involved domestic violence as defined in ORS 135.230 or the offense was committed against a minor child; or

(B) Any offense under this section or ORS 167.322, or the equivalent laws of another jurisdiction; or

(b) The person knowingly commits the animal abuse in the immediate presence of a minor child. For purposes of this paragraph, a minor child is in the immediate presence of animal abuse if the abuse is seen or directly perceived in any other manner by the minor child.

(5) When animal abuse in the first degree is a felony, the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission shall classify the offense as crime category 6 of the sentencing guidelines grid.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 1985, c. 662, § 3; Laws 2001, c. 926, § 8; Laws 2003, c. 577, § 8; Laws 2013, c. 719, § 2, eff. Aug. 1, 2013.

 

167.322. Aggravated animal abuse in the first degree

<Text subject to final change by the Oregon Office of the Legislative Counsel.>

(1) A person commits the crime of aggravated animal abuse in the first degree if the person:

(a) Maliciously kills an animal; or

(b) Intentionally or knowingly tortures an animal.

(2) Aggravated animal abuse in the first degree is a Class C felony and the Oregon Criminal Justice Commission shall classify the offense as crime category 6 of the sentencing guidelines grid.

(3) As used in this section:

(a) “Maliciously” means intentionally acting with a depravity of mind and reckless and wanton disregard of life.

(b) “Torture” means an action taken for the primary purpose of inflicting pain.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 1995, c. 663, § 2; Laws 2001, c. 926, § 9; Laws 2013, c. 719, § 3, eff. Aug. 1, 2013.

 

167.325. Animal neglect in the second degree

<Text subject to final change by the Oregon Office of the Legislative Counsel.>

(1) A person commits the crime of animal neglect in the second degree if, except as otherwise authorized by law, the person intentionally, knowingly, recklessly or with criminal negligence:

(a) Fails to provide minimum care for an animal in such person's custody or control; or

(b) Tethers a domestic animal in the person's custody or control and the tethering results in physical injury to the domestic animal.

(2) Animal neglect in the second degree is a Class B misdemeanor.

(3) Notwithstanding subsection (2) of this section, animal neglect in the second degree is a Class C felony if:

(a) The person committing the offense has previously been convicted of two or more offenses under this section, ORS 167.330 or the equivalent laws of another jurisdiction;

(b) The offense was part of a criminal episode involving 11 or more animals; or

(c) The person knowingly commits the offense in the immediate presence of a minor child and the person has one or more previous convictions for an offense involving domestic violence as defined in ORS 135.230. For purposes of this paragraph, a minor child is in the immediate presence of animal neglect if the neglect is seen or directly perceived in any other manner by the minor child.

(4) The Oregon Criminal Justice Commission shall classify animal neglect in the second degree under subsection (3) of this section:

(a) As crime category 6 if 11 to 40 animals were the subject of the neglect.

(b) As crime category 7 if more than 40 animals were the subject of the neglect or if the offense is a felony because of circumstances described in subsection (3)(a) or (c) of this section.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 1985, c. 662, § 4; Laws 2013, c. 719, § 4, eff. Aug. 1, 2013; Laws 2013, c. 382, § 5, eff. Jan. 1, 2014.

 

167.330. Animal neglect in the first degree

<Text subject to final change by the Oregon Office of the Legislative Counsel.>

(1) A person commits the crime of animal neglect in the first degree if, except as otherwise authorized by law, the person intentionally, knowingly, recklessly or with criminal negligence:

(a) Fails to provide minimum care for an animal in the person's custody or control and the failure to provide care results in serious physical injury or death to the animal; or

(b) Tethers a domestic animal in the person's custody or control and the tethering results in serious physical injury or death to the domestic animal.

(2) Animal neglect in the first degree is a Class A misdemeanor.

(3) Notwithstanding subsection (2) of this section, animal neglect in the first degree is a Class C felony if:

(a) The person committing the offense has previously been convicted of one or more offenses under this section, ORS 167.325 or the equivalent laws of another jurisdiction;

(b) The offense was part of a criminal episode involving 10 or more animals; or

(c) The person knowingly commits the offense in the immediate presence of a minor child. For purposes of this paragraph, a minor child is in the immediate presence of animal neglect if the neglect is seen or directly perceived in any other manner by the minor child.

(4) The Oregon Criminal Justice Commission shall classify animal neglect in the first degree under subsection (3) of this section:

(a) As crime category 6 if 10 to 40 animals were the subject of the neglect.

(b) As crime category 7 if more than 40 animals were the subject of the neglect or if the offense is a felony because of circumstances described in subsection (3)(a) or (c) of this section.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 1985, c. 662, § 5; Laws 2001, c. 926, § 10; Laws 2013, c. 719, § 5, eff. Aug. 1, 2013; Laws 2013, c. 382, § 4, eff. Jan. 1, 2014.

 

167.332. Possession of domestic animals by violator


<Text subject to final change by the Oregon Office of the Legislative Counsel.>

(1) Except as provided in subsections (3) and (4) of this section:

(a) In addition to any other penalty imposed by law, a person convicted of violating ORS 167.315, 167.325, 167.330, 167.333, 167.340 or 167.355 or of a misdemeanor under ORS 167.320, may not possess a domestic animal or any animal of the same genus against which the crime was committed for a period of five years following entry of the conviction.

(b) In addition to any other penalty imposed by law, a person convicted of violating ORS 167.322, 167.365 or 167.428 or of a felony under ORS 167.320, may not possess a domestic animal or any animal of the same genus against which the crime was committed for a period of 15 years following entry of the conviction.

(2) A person who possesses an animal in violation of this section commits a Class C misdemeanor. When a person is convicted of possessing an animal in violation of this section, as part of the sentence the court may order the removal of that animal from the person's residence and may prohibit the person from possessing any animal of the same genus that the person unlawfully possessed under this section or against which the underlying violation of ORS 167.315, 167.320, 167.322, 167.325, 167.330, 167.333, 167.340, 167.355, 167.365 or 167.428 was committed.

(3) The animal possession prohibition described in subsection (1) of this section does not apply to a person's first conviction if the person is the owner of a commercial livestock operation and the underlying violation of ORS 167.315, 167.320, 167.322, 167.325, 167.330, 167.333, 167.340, 167.355, 167.365 or 167.428 was committed against livestock.

(4)(a) A person subject to an animal possession prohibition described in subsection (1) of this section may file a motion with the sentencing court requesting a waiver of the prohibition. The person must file a sworn affidavit in support of the motion stating that:

(A) The person's conviction leading to the possession prohibition involved only livestock;

(B) During the two years before the conviction triggering the prohibition, the person was the owner of a commercial livestock operation;

(C) The person has not been convicted, in the previous five years, of a crime involving animals or domestic violence or a crime where the victim was under 18 years of age; and

(D) The person's conviction was the result of:

(i) Criminal liability for the conduct of another person under ORS 161.155 (2)(c);

(ii) Criminal liability of a corporation as described in ORS 161.170, and the person is a corporation; or

(iii) Animal neglect as described in ORS 167.325 or 167.330 and the person's criminal conduct was not knowing or intentional.

(b) When a person files a motion and affidavit described in paragraph (a) of this subsection, the sentencing court shall hold a hearing. At the hearing, the sentencing court shall grant the motion if the person proves by clear and convincing evidence that:

(A) Continued enforcement of the prohibition against possessing livestock would result in substantial economic hardship that cannot otherwise be mitigated;

(B) The person no longer poses any risk to animals; and

(C) The person is capable of providing and willing to provide necessary, adequate and appropriate levels of care for all livestock that would come within the person's custody or control if the petition is granted.

(c) When deciding a motion filed under this subsection, the sentencing court may consider the person's financial circumstances and mental health in determining whether the person is capable of adequately caring for livestock.

(d) If the sentencing court grants the motion described in this subsection, the waiver of the prohibition against possessing animals shall apply only to livestock. The sentencing court shall further order that for five years the person must consent to reasonable inspections by law enforcement and the United States Department of Agriculture to ensure the welfare of the livestock under the person's custody or control. A refusal to consent to a reasonable inspection described in this paragraph is contempt of court and, if the person is found in contempt, shall result in the sentencing court revoking the waiver of the possession prohibition.

(e) As used in this subsection, “commercial livestock operation” means a business engaged in the raising, breeding or selling of livestock for profit.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 2001, c. 926, § 3; Laws 2009, c. 486, § 1, eff. Jan. 1, 2010; Laws 2013, c. 719, § 6, eff. Aug. 1, 2013.

 

167.333. Sexual assault of animal

(1) A person commits the crime of sexual assault of an animal if the person:

(a) Touches or contacts, or causes an object or another person to touch or contact, the mouth, anus or sex organs of an animal or animal carcass for the purpose of arousing or gratifying the sexual desire of a person; or

(b) Causes an animal or animal carcass to touch or contact the mouth, anus or sex organs of a person for the purpose of arousing or gratifying the sexual desire of a person.

(2) Subsection (1) of this section does not apply to the use of products derived from animals.

(3) Sexual assault of an animal is a Class A misdemeanor.

Laws 2001, c. 926, § 5b; Laws 2003, c. 428, § 1.

 

167.334. Evaluation of person convicted of violating ORS 167.333

Upon the conviction of a defendant for violation of ORS 167.333, the court may order a psychiatric or psychological evaluation of the defendant for inclusion in the presentence report as described in ORS 137.077.

Laws 2001, c. 926, § 5c.

 

167.335. Exemption from ORS 167.315 to 167.333

Unless gross negligence can be shown, the provisions of ORS 167.315 to 167.333 do not apply to:

(1) The treatment of livestock being transported by owner or common carrier;

(2) Animals involved in rodeos or similar exhibitions;

(3) Commercially grown poultry;

(4) Animals subject to good animal husbandry practices;

(5) The killing of livestock according to the provisions of ORS 603.065;

(6) Animals subject to good veterinary practices as described in ORS 686.030;

(7) Lawful fishing, hunting and trapping activities;

(8) Wildlife management practices under color of law;

(9) Lawful scientific or agricultural research or teaching that involves the use of animals;

(10) Reasonable activities undertaken in connection with the control of vermin or pests; and

(11) Reasonable handling and training techniques.

Laws 1985, c. 662, § 6; Laws 1995, c. 663, § 4; Laws 2001, c. 926, § 10a.

 

167.337. Interfering with law enforcement animal

(1) A person commits the crime of interfering with a law enforcement animal if the person intentionally or knowingly injures or attempts to injure an animal the person knows or reasonably should know is a law enforcement animal while the law enforcement animal is being used in the lawful discharge of its duty.

(2) Interfering with a law enforcement animal is a Class A misdemeanor.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 2003, c. 543, § 5; Laws 2009, c. 555, § 1, eff. Jan. 1, 2010; Laws 2011, c. 597, § 167, eff. July 1, 2011, operative Jan. 1, 2012.

HISTORICAL AND STATUTORY NOTES

2011 Legislation

Laws 2011, c. 597, § 167, deleted Subsec. (3), which read:

“(3) When a person is convicted of interfering with a law enforcement animal, in addition to any other sentence the court may impose, the court shall impose a fine in the amount of $500.”

Laws 2011, c. 597, §§ 310, 332 and 333, eff. July 1, 2011, provide:

“SECTION 310. The amendments to statutes by sections 151 to 308 of this 2011 Act and the repeal of statutes by section 309 of this 2011 Act apply only to offenses committed on or after January 1, 2012.”

“SECTION 332. (1) Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, the provisions of this 2011 Act become operative January 1, 2012.

“(2) Sections 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 58a, 59, 61a, 150c and 311 of this 2011 Act, the amendments to ORS 1.178, sections 2, 2b and 2d, chapter 659, Oregon Laws 2009, and section 24, chapter 107, Oregon Laws 2010, by sections 61, 67a, 150, 150d and 150e of this 2011 Act and the repeal of section 1, chapter 659, Oregon Laws 2009, by section 150b of this 2011 Act become operative on the effective date of this 2011 Act.”

“SECTION 333. This 2011 Act being necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health and safety, an emergency is declared to exist, and this 2011 Act takes effect July 1, 2011.”


 

167.339. Assault of a law enforcement animal

(1) A person commits the crime of assaulting a law enforcement animal if:

(a) The person knowingly causes serious physical injury to or the death of a law enforcement animal, knowing that the animal is a law enforcement animal; and

(b) The injury or death occurs while the law enforcement animal is being used in the lawful discharge of the animal's duties.

(2) Assaulting a law enforcement animal is a Class C felony.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 2003, c. 543, § 3; Laws 2009, c. 555, § 2, eff. Jan. 1, 2010; Laws 2011, c. 597, § 168, eff. July 1, 2011, operative Jan. 1, 2012.

HISTORICAL AND STATUTORY NOTES

2011 Legislation

Laws 2011, c. 597, § 168, deleted Subsec. (3), which read:

“(3) When a person is convicted of assaulting a law enforcement animal, in addition to any other sentence the court may impose, the court shall impose a fine in the amount of $1,000.”

Laws 2011, c. 597, §§ 310, 332 and 333, eff. July 1, 2011, provide:

“SECTION 310. The amendments to statutes by sections 151 to 308 of this 2011 Act and the repeal of statutes by section 309 of this 2011 Act apply only to offenses committed on or after January 1, 2012.”

“SECTION 332. (1) Except as provided in subsection (2) of this section, the provisions of this 2011 Act become operative January 1, 2012.

“(2) Sections 53, 54, 55, 56, 57, 58, 58a, 59, 61a, 150c and 311 of this 2011 Act, the amendments to ORS 1.178, sections 2, 2b and 2d, chapter 659, Oregon Laws 2009, and section 24, chapter 107, Oregon Laws 2010, by sections 61, 67a, 150, 150d and 150e of this 2011 Act and the repeal of section 1, chapter 659, Oregon Laws 2009, by section 150b of this 2011 Act become operative on the effective date of this 2011 Act.”

“SECTION 333. This 2011 Act being necessary for the immediate preservation of the public peace, health and safety, an emergency is declared to exist, and this 2011 Act takes effect July 1, 2011.”

 

167.340. Animal abandonment

(1) A person commits the crime of animal abandonment if the person intentionally, knowingly, recklessly or with criminal negligence leaves a domestic animal or an equine at a location without providing minimum care.

(2) It is no defense to the crime defined in subsection (1) of this section that the defendant abandoned the animal at or near an animal shelter, veterinary clinic or other place of shelter if the defendant did not make reasonable arrangements for the care of the animal.

(3) Animal abandonment is a Class B misdemeanor.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 1985, c. 662, § 8; Laws 2001, c. 926, § 11; Laws 2009, c. 233, § 1, eff. Jan. 1, 2010.

 

167.345. Search and seizure; impoundment; liability

(1) As used in this section, “peace officer” has the meaning given that term in ORS 161.015.

(2) If there is probable cause to believe that any animal is being subjected to treatment in violation of ORS 167.315 to 167.333, 167.340, 167.355, 167.365 or 167.428, a peace officer, after obtaining a search warrant or in any other manner authorized by law, may enter the premises where the animal is located to provide the animal with food, water and emergency medical treatment and may impound the animal. If after reasonable effort the owner or person having custody of the animal cannot be found and notified of the impoundment, the notice shall be conspicuously posted on the premises and within 72 hours after the impoundment the notice shall be sent by certified mail to the address, if any, where the animal was impounded.

(3) A peace officer is not liable for any damages for an entry under subsection (2) of this section, unless the damages were caused by the unnecessary actions of the peace officer that were intentional or reckless.

(4)(a) A court may order an animal impounded under subsection (2) of this section to be held at any animal care facility in the state. A facility receiving the animal shall provide adequate food and water and may provide veterinary care.

(b) A court may order a fighting bird impounded under subsection (2) of this section to be held on the property of the owner, possessor or keeper of the fighting bird in accordance with ORS 167.433.

CREDIT(S)
Formerly 167.860; Laws 1993, c. 519, § 1; Laws 1995, c. 663, § 5; Laws 2001, c. 926, § 12; Laws 2009, c. 550, § 1, eff. Jan. 1, 2010.

 

167.347. Forfeiture of impounded animal

 <Text subject to final change by the Oregon Office of the Legislative Counsel.>

(1) If any animal is impounded pursuant to ORS 167.345 and is being held by a county animal shelter or other animal care agency pending outcome of criminal action charging a violation of ORS 167.315 to 167.333, 167.340, 167.355, 167.365 or 167.428, prior to final disposition of the criminal charge, the county or other animal care agency or, on behalf of the county or other animal care agency, the district attorney, may file a petition in the criminal action requesting that the court issue an order forfeiting the animal to the county or other animal care agency prior to final disposition of the criminal charge. The petitioner shall serve a true copy of the petition upon the defendant and, unless the district attorney has filed the petition on behalf of the county or other animal care agency, the district attorney.

(2)(a) Upon receipt of a petition pursuant to subsection (1) of this section, the court shall set a hearing on the petition. The hearing shall be conducted within 14 days after the filing of the petition, or as soon as practicable.

(b) To provide notice on any potential claimant who may have an interest in any animals impounded pursuant to ORS 167.345 and as an alternate form of service upon a defendant who cannot be personally served as required in subsection (1) of this section, a petitioner may publish notice of the filing of the petition, printed twice weekly for up to 14 consecutive days in a daily or weekly newspaper, as defined in ORS 193.010, published in the county in which the hearing is to be held or, if there is none, in a daily or weekly newspaper, as defined in ORS 193.010, generally circulated in the county in which the hearing is to be held. The notice of the filing of the petition required under this subsection shall contain a description of the impounded animal or animals, the name of the owner or reputed owner thereof, the location from which the animal or animals were impounded and the time and place of the hearing if the hearing has been set at the time of publication, or otherwise the name, address and phone number for the attorney for the petitioner, who shall upon request provide further details on the hearing date, place and time.

(3) At a hearing conducted pursuant to subsection (2) of this section, the petitioner shall have the burden of establishing probable cause to believe that the animal was subjected to a violation of ORS 167.315 to 167.333, 167.340, 167.355, 167.365 or 167.428. The defendant or any other claimant shall have an opportunity to be heard before the court makes its final finding. If the court finds that probable cause exists, the court shall order immediate forfeiture of the animal to the petitioner, unless the defendant or any other claimant, within 72 hours of the hearing, posts a security deposit or bond with the court clerk in an amount determined by the court to be sufficient to repay all reasonable costs incurred, and anticipated to be incurred, by the petitioner in caring for the animal from the date of initial impoundment to the date of trial.

(4) If a security deposit or bond has been posted in accordance with subsection (3) of this section, and the trial in the action is continued at a later date, any order of continuance shall require the defendant or any other claimant to post an additional security deposit or bond in an amount determined by the court that shall be sufficient to repay all additional reasonable costs anticipated to be incurred by the petitioner in caring for the animal until the new date of trial.

(5) If a security deposit or bond has been posted in accordance with subsection (4) of this section, the petitioner may draw from that security deposit or bond the actual reasonable costs incurred by the petitioner in caring for the impounded animal from the date of initial impoundment to the date of final disposition of the animal in the criminal action.

(6) The provisions of this section are in addition to, and not in lieu of, the provisions of ORS 167.350 and 167.435 and ORS chapters 87 and 88.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 1995, c. 369, § 2; Laws 2001, c. 926, § 13; Laws 2009, c. 550, § 2, eff. Jan. 1, 2010; Laws 2011, c. 455, § 1, eff. June 21, 2011; Laws 2013, c. 719, § 7, eff. Aug. 1, 2013.

 

 

167.348. Placement of forfeited animal; preference

<Text subject to final change by the Oregon Office of the Legislative Counsel.>

(1) If an animal is forfeited according to the provisions of ORS 167.347 or 167.350, the agency to which the animal was forfeited may place the animal with a new owner. The agency may give placement preference to any person or persons who had prior contact with the animal, including but not limited to family members and friends of the former owner whom the agency determines are capable of providing necessary, adequate and appropriate levels of care for the animal. The agency may not, however, place the animal with family members or friends of the former owner who aided or abetted the criminal conduct underlying the forfeiture or had knowledge of the criminal conduct and failed to intervene. As a condition of placement, the agency shall require the new owner to execute an agreement to provide minimum care to the animal. The agreement must indicate that allowing the former owner to possess the animal constitutes a crime.

(2) Notwithstanding subsection (1) of this section, the agency may not place the animal with any person who resides with the former owner.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 1995, c. 369, § 3; Laws 2009, c. 273, § 1, eff. Jan. 1, 2010; Laws 2013, c. 719, § 8, eff. Aug. 1, 2013.

 

 

167.349. Encouraging animal abuse

(1) A person commits the crime of encouraging animal abuse if the person:

(a) Obtains a previously abused, neglected or abandoned animal from an animal care agency under ORS 167.348 or the court under ORS 167.350; and

(b) Knowingly allows the person from whom the animal was forfeited to possess the animal.

(2) Encouraging animal abuse is a Class C misdemeanor.

CREDIT(S)

Added by Laws 2009, c. 273, § 3, eff. Jan. 1, 2010.

 

167.350. Forfeiture of rights in mistreated animal; costs; penalty

(1) In addition to and not in lieu of any other sentence it may impose, a court may require a defendant convicted under ORS 167.315 to 167.333, 167.340, 167.355 or 167.365 to forfeit any rights of the defendant in the animal subjected to the violation, and to repay the reasonable costs incurred by any person or agency prior to judgment in caring for each animal subjected to the violation.

(2)(a) When the court orders the defendant's rights in the animal to be forfeited, the court may further order that those rights be given over to an appropriate person or agency demonstrating a willingness to accept and care for the animal or to the county or an appropriate animal care agency for further disposition in accordance with accepted practices for humane treatment of animals. The court may not transfer the defendant's rights in the animal to any person who resides with the defendant.

(b) This subsection does not limit the right of the person or agency to whom rights are granted to resell or otherwise make disposition of the animal. A transfer of rights under this subsection constitutes a transfer of ownership. The court shall require a person to whom rights are granted to execute an agreement to provide minimum care to the animal. The agreement must indicate that allowing the defendant to possess the animal constitutes a crime.

(3) In addition to and not in lieu of any other sentence it may impose, a court may order the owner or person having custody of an animal to repay the reasonable costs incurred by any person or agency in providing minimum care to the animal.

(4) A court may order a person convicted under ORS 167.315 to 167.333, 167.340, 167.355, 167.365 or 167.428 to participate in available animal cruelty prevention programs or education programs, or both, or to obtain psychological counseling for treatment of mental health disorders that, in the court's judgment, contributed to the commission of the crime. The person shall bear any costs incurred by the person for participation in counseling or treatment programs under this subsection.

(5) ORS 131.550 to 131.600 do not apply to the forfeiture of an animal subjected to a violation of ORS 167.315 to 167.333, 167.340, 167.355, 167.365 or 167.428. Any such animal is subject to forfeiture as provided in subsections (1) to (3) of this section or, if the animal is a fighting bird, as provided in ORS 167.435.

CREDIT(S)

Formerly 167.862; Laws 1993, c. 519, § 2; Laws 1995, c. 663, § 6; Laws 2001, c. 666, § 29; Laws 2001, c. 926, §§ 14a, 14b, eff. July 31, 2005; Laws 2005, c. 830, § 28, eff. Sept. 2, 2005; Laws 2009, c. 273, § 2, eff. Jan. 1, 2010; Laws 2009, c. 550, § 3, eff. Jan. 1, 2010.

 

167.351. Definitions

(1) As used in this section:

(a) "Nonambulatory" means unable to stand or walk unassisted.

(b) "Livestock auction market" has the meaning given that term in ORS 599.205.

(2) A person commits the crime of trading in nonambulatory livestock if the person knowingly delivers or accepts delivery of a nonambulatory livestock animal at a livestock auction market. This subsection does not apply to the delivery to, or acceptance by, a licensed veterinarian at a livestock auction market for the purpose of humanely euthanizing or providing appropriate medical care to the animal.

(3) The crime of trading in nonambulatory livestock is a Class A misdemeanor.

Laws 2003, c. 287, § 2.

 

167.352. Interfering with assistance, search and rescue or therapy animal

<Text subject to final change by the Oregon Office of the Legislative Counsel.>

(1) A person commits the crime of interfering with an assistance, a search and rescue or a therapy animal if the person intentionally or knowingly:

(a) Injures or attempts to injure an animal the person knows or reasonably should know is an assistance animal, a search and rescue animal or a therapy animal;

(b) Interferes with an assistance animal while the assistance animal is being used to provide assistance to a person with a disability; or

(c) Interferes with a search and rescue animal or a therapy animal while the animal is being used for search and rescue or therapy purposes.

(2) As used in this section, “assistance animal” has the meaning given that term in section 2 of this 2013 Act.

(3) As used in this section and ORS 30.822:

(a) “Search and rescue animal” means that the animal has been professionally trained for, and is actively used for, search and rescue purposes.

(b) “Therapy animal” means an animal other than an assistance animal that has been professionally trained for, and is actively used for, therapy purposes.

(4) Interfering with an assistance, a search and rescue or a therapy animal is a Class A misdemeanor.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 1993, c. 312, § 3; Laws 2007, c. 70, § 37, eff. Jan. 1, 2008; Laws 2013, c. 530, § 6, eff. June 26, 2013.

 

167.355. Involvement in animal fighting

(1) A person commits the crime of involvement in animal fighting if the person:

(a) Owns or trains an animal with the intention that the animal engage in an exhibition of fighting;

(b) Promotes, conducts, participates in or is present as a spectator at an exhibition of fighting or preparations thereto;

(c) Keeps or uses, or in any way is connected with or interested in the management of, or receives money for the admission of any person to any place kept or used for the purpose of an exhibition of fighting; or

(d) Knowingly suffers or permits any place over which the person has possession or control to be occupied, kept or used for the purpose of an exhibition of fighting.

(2) For purposes of this section:

(a) “Animal” means any bird, reptile, amphibian, fish or nonhuman mammal, other than a dog or a fighting bird as defined in ORS 167.426.

(b) “Exhibition of fighting” means a public or private display of combat between two or more animals in which the fighting, killing, maiming or injuring of animals is a significant feature. “Exhibition of fighting” does not include demonstrations of the hunting or tracking skills of an animal or the lawful use of animals for hunting, tracking or self-protection.

(3) Involvement in animal fighting is a Class C felony.

CREDIT(S)

Formerly 167.865; Laws 1987, c. 249, § 6; Laws 2003, c. 484, § 9; Laws 2009, c. 796, § 2, eff. Jan. 1, 2010.

 

167.360. Definitions

As used in ORS 167.360 to 167.375:

(1) “Breaking stick” means a device designed for insertion behind the molars of a dog for the purpose of breaking the dog's grip on another animal or object.

(2) “Cat mill” means a device that rotates around a central support with one arm designed to secure a dog and one arm designed to secure a cat, rabbit or other small animal beyond the grasp of the dog.

(3) “Dogfight” means a fight, arranged by any person, between two or more dogs the purpose or probable result of which fight is the infliction of injury by one dog upon another.

(4) “Dogfighting paraphernalia” means:

(a) A breaking stick;

(b) A springpole;
 
(c) A cat mill;
 
(d) A treadmill;

(e) A fighting pit;

(f) A leather or mesh collar with a strap more than two inches in width;

(g) A weighted or unweighted chain collar weighing 10 pounds or more; or

(h) An unprescribed veterinary medicine that is a prescription drug as defined in ORS 689.005.

(5) “Fighting dog” means a dog that is intentionally bred or trained to be used in, or that is actually used in, a dogfight. A dog does not constitute a fighting dog solely on account of its breed.

(6) “Fighting pit” means a walled area designed to contain a dogfight.

(7) “Springpole” means a biting surface attached to a stretchable device, suspended at a height sufficient to prevent a dog from reaching the biting surface while touching the ground.

(8) “Treadmill” means:

(a) A carpet mill made of narrow sections of carpet;

(b) A modified electric treadmill for the purpose of conditioning dogs; or

(c) A slat mill with a running surface constructed of slats made of wood, fiberglass, plastic or other similar material.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 1987, c. 249, § 1; Laws 2005, c. 467, § 1; Laws 2008, c. 42 (1st Sp. Sess.), § 3, eff. Mar. 11, 2008.


167.365. Dogfighting

(1) A person commits the crime of dogfighting if the person knowingly does any of the following:

(a) Owns, possesses, keeps, breeds, trains, buys, sells or offers to sell a fighting dog, including but not limited to any advertisement by the person to sell such a dog.

(b) Promotes, conducts or participates in, or performs any service in the furtherance of, an exhibition of dogfighting, including but not limited to refereeing of a dogfight, handling of dogs at a dogfight, transportation of spectators to a dogfight, organizing a dogfight, advertising a dogfight, providing or serving as a stakes holder for any money wagered on a fight.

(c) Keeps, uses or manages, or accepts payment of admission to, any place kept or used for the purpose of dogfighting.

(d) Suffers or permits any place over which the person has possession or control to be occupied, kept or used for the purpose of an exhibition of dogfighting.

(2) Dogfighting is a Class C felony.

Laws 1987, c. 249, § 2.

 

167.370. Participation in dogfighting

(1) A person commits the crime of participation in dogfighting if the person knowingly:

(a) Attends or has paid admission at any place for the purpose of viewing or betting upon a dogfight.

(b) Advertises or otherwise offers to sell equipment that the person knows or reasonably should know will be used for the purpose of training and handling a fighting dog.

(2) Participation in dogfighting is a Class C felony.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 1987, c. 249, § 3; Laws 2008, c. 42 (1st Sp. Sess.), § 1, eff. Mar. 11, 2008.


 

167.372. Possessing dogfighting paraphernalia

(1) A person commits the crime of possessing dogfighting paraphernalia if the person owns or possesses dogfighting paraphernalia with the intent that the paraphernalia be used to train a dog as a fighting dog or be used in the furtherance of a dogfight.

(2) Possessing dogfighting paraphernalia is a Class C felony.

CREDIT(S)

Laws 2005, c. 467, § 3; Laws 2008, c. 42 (1st Sp. Sess.), § 2, eff. Mar. 11, 2008.

 
 
167.374. Breeding dogs; possession; records
 
(1) As used in this section:

(a) “Boarding kennel” means a facility that provides care for a fee to dogs that stay at the facility an average of less than 30 days.

(b) “Dog” means a member of the subspecies Canis lupus familiaris or a hybrid of that subspecies.

(c) “Litter” means one or more dogs, sold individually or together, that are all or part of a group of dogs born to the same mother at the same time.

(2) A person may not possess, control or otherwise have charge of at the same time more than 50 sexually intact dogs that are two years of age or older for the primary purpose of reproduction. It is prima facie evidence that a person possesses dogs for the primary purpose of reproduction if during a 12-month period the person sells, offers for sale, barters or exchanges more than three litters of dogs that are less than eight months of age.

(3) A person that possesses, controls or otherwise has charge of 50 or more sexually intact dogs that are eight months of age or older shall maintain a record for each of those dogs that identifies:

(a) The date of birth for the dog or, if the date of birth is unknown, the date the person acquired possession, control or charge of the dog and the source of the dog;

(b) The dates on which the dog has been bred;

(c) For a female, the number of dogs in each litter produced; and

(d) The disposition the person makes of each dog possessed by, controlled by or in the charge of the person, including the date of disposition, manner of disposition and the name and address information for any person taking possession, control or charge of a dog.

(4) A person shall retain a record required under subsection (3) of this section for a period of three years following the death of the dog or a date on which the person permanently ceased to have possession, control or charge of the dog.

(5) Subsections (2) to (4) of this section do not apply to:

(a) An animal control agency, humane society or animal shelter;

(b) A person who provides care for dogs at the request of a unit of government, government agency, humane society or animal shelter;

(c) A veterinary facility;

(d) A person that is transporting dogs; or

(e) A boarding kennel.

(6) A violation of this section is a Class B misdemeanor. However, a court shall suspend sentence under this subsection for a violation of subsection (2) of this section if the person agrees to have a sufficient number of dogs spayed or neutered to remedy the violation.

CREDIT(S)
 
Added by Laws 2009, c. 297, § 1, eff. Jan. 1, 2010.
 

 

167.375. Repealed by Laws 2009, c. 550, § 8, eff. Jan. 1, 2010

HISTORICAL AND STATUTORY NOTES

2003 Main Volume

Repealed 167.375 related to seizure of fighting dogs.

Formerly:

Laws 1987, c. 249, § 4.

 

167.376. Breeding dogs; standard of care

(1) As used in this section:

(a) “Boarding kennel” means a facility that provides care for a fee to dogs that stay at the facility an average of less than 30 days.

(b) “Dog” means a member of the subspecies Canis lupus familiaris or a hybrid of that subspecies.

(c) “Litter” means one or more dogs, sold individually or together, that are all or part of a group of dogs born to the same mother at the same time.

(d) “Regular exercise” means the removal of the dog from the dog's primary enclosure and:

(A) Walking the dog on a leash;

(B) Allowing the dog to move about freely within a building or an outdoor space at least one hour per day; or

(C) Allowing the dog to walk on a treadmill, jenny mill, slat mill or similar device, if use of the device is prescribed for the dog by a veterinarian to accommodate a specific medical condition.

(2) A person that possesses, controls or otherwise has charge of at the same time 10 or more sexually intact dogs that are eight months of age or older shall, in addition to providing minimum care as defined in ORS 167.310:

(a) Provide each dog with sufficient space to turn about freely, stand and sit and to lie down without the head, face, tail, legs or feet of the dog touching the sides of the enclosure or touching any other dog.

(b) Provide each dog with an enclosure that:

(A) Has a solid floor without slats or gaps;

(B) Is six inches higher than the head of the tallest dog in that enclosure when the tallest dog is in a normal standing position;

(C) If elevated above the floor of a room, is placed so that the floor of the enclosure is no more than 42 inches above the floor of the room; and

(D) Is not stacked or otherwise placed above or below any other dog enclosure.

(c) Provide each dog that is more than four months of age with at least one hour of regular exercise each day, unless a veterinarian has certified that the dog is medically precluded from exercise.

(d) Remove waste and contaminants from the enclosure at least once each day.

(e) Remove the dog from the enclosure when cleaning the enclosure of waste and contaminants.

(f) Maintain a record for each sexually intact dog that is eight months of age or older that identifies:

(A) The date of birth for the dog or, if the date of birth is unknown, the date on which the person acquired possession, control or charge of the dog and the source of the dog;

(B) Any veterinary care provided for the dog; and

(C) The disposition the person makes of each dog possessed by, controlled by or in the charge of the person, including the date of disposition, manner of disposition and the name and address information for any person taking possession, control or charge of a dog.

(3) A person shall retain a record required under subsection (2) of this section for a period of three years following the death of the dog or a date on which the person permanently ceased to have possession, control or charge of the dog.

(4) Subsections (2) and (3) of this section do not apply to:

(a) An animal control agency, humane society or animal shelter;

(b) A person who provides care for dogs at the request of a unit of government, government agency, humane society or animal shelter;

(c) A veterinary facility;

(d) A person that is transporting dogs; or

(e) A boarding kennel.

(5) A violation of this section is a Class B misdemeanor.

CREDIT(S)

Added by Laws 2009, c. 297, § 2, eff. Jan. 1, 2010.

 

167.379. Repealed by Laws 2005, c. 830, § 48, eff. Sept. 2, 2005.

 HISTORICAL AND STATUTORY NOTES

2003 Main Volume

Repealed 167.379 related to forfeiture of rights in fighting dogs or property.

 

167.380. Laws 1987, c. 249, § 5; repealed by Laws 2001, c. 666, § 56

 

167.385. Unauthorized use of livestock animal

(1) A person commits the crime of unauthorized use of a livestock animal when the person knowingly:

(a) Takes, appropriates, obtains or withholds a livestock animal from the owner thereof or derives benefit from a livestock animal without the consent of the owner of the animal; or

(b) Takes or holds a livestock animal and thereby obtains the use of the animal to breed, bear or raise offspring without the consent of the owner of the animal.

(2) Except as otherwise provided by law, offspring born to a female livestock animal or hatched from the egg of a female livestock animal belong to the owner of the female livestock animal until the owner transfers ownership of the offspring.

(3) As used in this section, "livestock animal" has the same meaning given that term in ORS 164.055.

(4) Unauthorized use of a livestock animal is a Class A misdemeanor.

(5) In addition to any criminal sanctions, if a defendant is convicted of the crime of unauthorized use of a livestock animal under this section, the court shall order the defendant to pay restitution to the owner of the animal.

Laws 1993, c. 252, § 1.

 

167.387. Definitions

As used in this section and ORS 167.388:

(1) "Livestock" has the meaning given in ORS 609.125.

(2) "Livestock production facility" means:

(a) Any facility or organization engaged in animal breeding, production or processing; or

(b) Any facility or institution whose primary purpose is to impound estray animals, as that term is defined in ORS 607.007.

Laws 1993, c. 252, § 4; Laws 1999, c. 756, § 14.

 

167.388. Interference with livestock production

(1) A person commits the crime of interference with livestock production when the person, with the intent to interfere with livestock production:

(a) Takes, appropriates, obtains or withholds livestock from the owner thereof, or causes the loss, death or injury of any livestock maintained at a livestock production facility;

(b) Damages, vandalizes or steals any property located on a livestock production facility; or

(c) Obtains access to a livestock production facility to perform any act contained in this subsection or any other act not authorized by the livestock production facility.

(2) The crime of interference with livestock production is:

(a) A Class C felony if damage to the livestock production facility is $2,500 or more; or

(b) A Class A misdemeanor if there is no damage to the livestock production facility or if damage to the facility is less than $2,500.

(3) Determination of damages to a livestock production facility shall be made by the court. In making its determination, the court shall consider the reasonable costs of:

(a) Replacing lost, injured or destroyed livestock;

(b) Restoring the livestock production facility to the approximate condition of the facility before the damage occurred; and

(c) Replacing damaged or missing records, data, material, equipment or substances used in the breeding and production of livestock.

(4) In addition to any criminal sanctions, if a defendant is convicted of the crime of interference with livestock production under subsection (1) of this section, the court shall order the defendant to pay restitution to the owner of the animal or the owner of the livestock production facility.

Laws 1993, c. 252, §§ 2,3; Laws 2001, c. 554, § 2.

 

167.390. Commerce in fur of domestic cats and dogs

(1) A person may not take, buy, sell, barter or otherwise exchange for commerce in fur purposes the raw fur or products that include the fur of a domestic cat or dog if the fur is obtained through a process that kills or maims the cat or dog. As used in this section, "domestic cat or dog" does not include coyote, fox, lynx, bobcat or any other wild or commercially raised wild feline or wild canine species or a hybrid thereof that is not recognized as an endangered species by the United States Fish and Wildlife Service.

(2) Violation of subsection (1) of this section, or any rule promulgated pursuant thereto, is a Class A misdemeanor when the offense is committed with a culpable mental state as defined in ORS 161.085.

Laws 1999, c. 995, §§ 1,2.

 



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