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Dog: Related Statutes

Statute Name Citation Summary
AK - Assistance Animal - Alaska's Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   A. S. § 09.65.150; 11.76.130; 11.76.133; AK ST § 09.65.150; 11.76.130; 11.76.133  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
AK - Bite - Killing dogs annoying or evincing tendency to bite animals or fowls.   AK ST § 03.55.030  

This Alaska statute provides that any dog that habitually annoys any wild deer, reindeer, sheep, cattle, horse, or other animal or bird either domestic or wild, or evinces a disposition which makes it likely that it will without provocation bite an animal or fowl, may be lawfully killed by any person when it is found at large. The owner or keeper of the dog, if known or reasonably identifiable, shall be notified and given reasonable opportunity to restrain the dog before it is lawful to kill it.

 
AK - Dogs - Title 3. Agriculture and Animals. Chapter 55. Dogs.   AK ST § 03.55.010 - 070   These Alaska statutes give permission to kill dangerous dogs that are running at large or those that are chasing livestock.  It also defines a dangerous dog - "Any dog which when unprovoked has ever bitten or attacked a human being is considered vicious . . ."  Notably, "[a]ny person may lawfully kill any vicious or mad dog running at large."  This section also allows a village council of an unincorporated village to destroy loose dogs in the village or otherwise control dogs to the extent authorized first class cities.  
AK - Ordinances - § 03.55.070. Power of village council to control dogs   AK ST § 03.55.070  

This Alaska statute enables a village council the power to destroy loose dogs in the village and otherwise control dogs to the extent authorized first class cities.  The council may impose and enforce the provisions of a dog control ordinance in the total area within 20 miles of the village.

 
AK - Trusts - § 13.12.907. Honorary trusts; trusts for pets   AK ST § 13.12.907   This Alaska statute provides that trusts for the continuing care of designated domestic animals are valid, provided they are a duration of 21 years or less.  The trust terminates when a living animal is no longer covered by the trust.  Any remaining trust funds do not go to the trustee, but rather transfer by the order stipulated in the statute.  
AL - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   AL ST § 21-7-1 - 9; § 3-1-7; § 32-5A-220  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
AL - Dog Fighting - Activities relating to fighting of dogs prohibited; violations; confiscation; procedures for disposition of animals; bond for the care of seized dog; forfeiture.   AL ST § 3-1-29   This Alabama statute constitutes the state's dogfighting law.  Under the law, it is a class C felony for any person to own, possess, keep or train any dog with the intent that such dog shall be engaged in an exhibition of fighting with another dog; for amusement or gain, to cause any dog to fight with another dog, or cause any dogs to injure each other; or to permit any of the above acts.  The law also makes it a class C felony to knowingly be present or be a spectator at dogfights.  
AL - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   AL ST § 3-1-1 to 29; AL ST § 3-6-1 to 4; AL ST § 3-7A-1 to 16; AL ST § 3-8-1; AL ST § 9-11-305 to 307   These statutes comprise Alabama's relevant dog laws. Included among the provisions are licensing requirements, dangerous dog provisions, and the chapter on rabies.  
AL - Dog Bite/Dangerous Animal - Liability of Owners of Dogs Biting or Injuring Persons.   AL ST § 3-1-1 - 6; AL ST § 3-6-1 to 4; AL ST § 3-7A-9  

These Alabama statutes outline the state's dog bite law.  The law first provides that, when any person owns or keeps a vicious or dangerous animal of any kind and, as a result of his or her careless management or allowing the dog to go at liberty, and another person, without fault is injured, such owner shall be liable in damages for such injury.  If any dog shall, without provocation, bite or injure any person who is at the time at a place where he or she has a legal right to be, the owner of such dog shall be liable in damages to the person so bitten or injured.  This apparent strict liability has a mitigation provision that states that the owner of such dog shall be entitled to plead and prove in mitigation of damages that he had no knowledge of any circumstances indicating such dog to be or to have been vicious or dangerous.  If an owner, however, is aware that his or her dog is rabid at the time of the bite, he or she shall be liable for twice the damages sustained.

 
AL - Fur - § 13A-11-241. Cruelty in first and second degrees (dog/cat fur provision)   AL ST § 13A-11-241   In Alabama, a person commits the crime of cruelty to a dog or cat in the first degree if he or she skins a domestic dog or cat or offers for sale or exchange or offers to buy or exchange the fur, hide, or pelt of a domestic dog or cat. Cruelty to a dog or cat in the first degree is a Class C felony.  
AL - Impound - Destruction of impounded dogs and cats   AL ST 3-7A-8   This Alabama statute provides that all dogs and cats which have been impounded for lack of rabies immunization, after due notice has been given to the owner as provided in Section 3-7A-7, may be humanely destroyed and disposed of when not redeemed by the owner within seven days.  The owner may redeem the animal before destruction by paying the associated costs of vaccination (if no proof of prior vaccination) and impoundment.  
AL - Impound - Maintenance of pound; notice of impoundment; adoption of animals.   AL ST 3-7A-7   This Alabama statute provides that it is the duty of each and every county in the state to provide a suitable county pound and impounding officer for the impoundment of dogs and cats found running at large in violation of the provisions of this chapter.  When dogs and cats are impounded and if the owner thereof is known, such owner shall be given direct notice of the impoundment of said animal or animals belonging to him; or the impounding officer may make said animal or animals available for adoption after a period of not less than seven days.  
AL - Leash - When dogs permitted in areas; liability of owners of dogs at large in areas (wildlife management areas)   AL ST § 9-11-305 to 307  

This Alabama statute provides that no dog shall be permitted except on leash within any wildlife management area except in accordance with the rules and regulations promulgated by the Commissioner of Conservation and Natural Resources.  The owner of any dog at large within any wildlife management area shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

 
AL - Sterilization - Chapter 9. Sterilization of Dogs and Cats.   AL ST § 3-9-1 to 4   These statutes require animal shelters, animal control agencies, and humane societies to sterilize dogs and cats acquired from other animal shelters, animal control agencies, and humane societies.  For purposes of this statute, the term "sterilization" refers to the surgical removal of the reproductive organs of a dog or cat in order to render the animal unable to reproduce.  Adoptive animals must be sterilized by a licensed veterinarian before the animal is released to the new owner, or the new owner must enter into a written agreement with the facility certifying that sterilization will be performed by a licensed veterinarian within 30 days after acquisition of the animal or within 30 days of the sexual maturity of the animal.   
AR - Assistance Animal - Arkansas Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   AR ST § 20-14-301 to 308  

The following statute comprises the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog law.

 
AR - Breed - Wolf-Hybrid - Wolf-Hybrid Vaccination   AR ST § 20-19-406   This Arkansas statute outlines the procedure for vaccination of wolf-hybrid dogs, including procedures for handling bites by these canines.  
AR - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   AR ST §§ 20-19-101 to 408; § 2-40-110; § 2-39-110; § 15-41-113; § 15-42-303; § 5-54-126   These Arkansas statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions including licensing laws, rabies control, and mandatory sterilization laws.  Also contained is the state's Wolf-Hybrid statutory section.  
AR - Exotic Pets - Subchapter 4. Ownership and Breeding of Wolves and Wolf-Dog Hybrids   AR ST § 20-19-401 to 408   This chapter of Arkansas laws concerns the regulation of wolves and wolf-dog hybrids kept as companion animals. Under the law, a "wolf-dog hybrid” means any animal which is publicly acknowledged by its owner as being the offspring of a wolf and domestic dog; however, no animal may be judged to be a wolf or wolf-dog hybrid based strictly on its appearance. The specific rabies vaccination requirements for wolf-dog hybrids are detailed as well as confinement requirements (i.e, specific fence dimensions). If a wolf or wolf-dog hybrid bites a person or injures or destroys another animal while out of its confined area, the person responsible for the adequate confinement of the animal upon conviction shall be guilty of a Class A misdemeanor. (See also Link to Ownership and Possession of Large Carnivores Law)  
AR - Ordinances - Regulation by suburban improvement district (dogs/cats).   AR ST § 14-16-701   This Arkansas statute provides that, upon the written request of the governing body of a suburban improvement district (as defined by statute), a county may by ordinance control and regulate dogs and cats within all or any part of the suburban improvement district.  This statute does not elaborate on the confines of such ordinances, so it is assumed the subject matter is constrained only through preemption.  
AR - Ordinances - § 14-54-1102. Dogs running astray.   AR ST § 14-54-1102  

This Arkansas statute provides that municipal corporations have the power to prevent the running at large of dogs and the injuries and annoyances associated with them.  Further, this statute allows municipalities to authorize the destruction or impoundment of dogs if found in violation of ordinance.  However, prior  to destroying the dog, the municipality shall give the dog's owner at least five (5) days' notice of the date of the proposed destruction of the dog by certified mail if the dog carries the owner's address.

 
AR - Pet Sales - Chapter 97. Retail Pet Stores.   AR ST §§ 4-97-101 - 109   This statutory section comprises the Arkansas Retail Pet Store Consumer Protection Act of 1991.  The purpose of the act is to ensure that purchasers receive consumer animals that are physically and temperamentally sound, healthy, and fit as companions.  The Act also provides a means by which the acquisition and care of those animals can be monitored.  
AZ - Assistance Animal - Arizona's Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   AZ ST § 11-1024, § 13-2910  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
AZ - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty/Animal Fighting Statutes   AZ ST § 13-2910 - 09; § 13-1411   The Arizona section contains the state's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions.  A person commits cruelty to animals if he or she intentionally, knowingly or recklessly subjects any animal under the person's custody or control to cruel neglect or abandonment, fails to provide medical attention necessary to prevent protracted suffering to any animal under the person's custody or control, inflicts unnecessary physical injury to any animal, or recklessly subjects any animal to cruel mistreatment, among other things.  Animal is defined as a mammal, bird, reptile or amphibian.  Exclusions include hunting and agricultural activities in accordance with those laws and regulations in Arizona.  Intentionally attending a dogfight is a felony under this provision whereas attendance at a cockfight is a misdemeanor.  
AZ - Dog - Arizona Consolidated Dog Laws   AZ ST § 11-1001 - 1029; AZ ST § 28-2422; AZ ST § 17-309   These Arizona statutes comprise the laws relating to dogs and animal bites.  Included are provisions related to registration, collaring, and vaccination of dogs.  With regard to dangerous dogs, Arizona law provides that a person with knowledge of a dog's vicious propensity must also keep the dog in an enclosed yard or confined area with a sign indicating the dog's vicious tendencies.  
AZ - Dog Ordinances - Powers and duties of board of supervisors (dogs/animals)   AZ ST § 11-1005   This Arizona statute provides that each county board of supervisors may regulate dogs, including the designation of a county enforcement agent, contracting with any city or town to enforce the provisions of any ordinance enacted by such city or town for the control of dogs, and for the unincorporated areas of the county, by ordinance, regulate, restrain and prohibit the running at large of dogs and the excessive and unrestrained barking of dogs.  They may also establish either civil or criminal penalties for violations of the above ordinances and establish a rabies quarantine zone.  
AZ - Leash Laws - Article 6. Animal Control.   AZ ST § 11-1012   This Arizona laws provides generally that no female dog in her breeding season or vicious dog may be allowed to go at large.  It further delineates the state's leash requirements for dogs, including during times of rabies quarantines, in state parks, and at public schools.  Exceptions under the law include the training of livestock dogs and hunting dogs, among others.  
AZ - License and Vaccination Ordinances - Exemption of cities, towns and counties (dogs/animals)   AZ ST § 11-1018  

This Arizona statute exempts cities or towns from the provisions of this article if they impose a license fee and vaccination on dogs by ordinance, provided that such ordinance is equal to or more stringent than the provisions of this article.  Further, the provisions of this article shall not apply to counties which regulate the running at large of dogs in the unincorporated areas of the county by ordinance provided that such ordinance is equal to or more stringent than the provisions of this article.

 
AZ - Ordinances - Article 2. Board of Trustees Government After Disincorporation.   AZ ST § 9-219   This Arizona statute provides that the board of trustees of a city may pass ordinances not inconsistent or in conflict with the laws of this state.  More specifically, this statute provides that the board may restrain, under penalties, the running at large of cattle or other animals, and provide rules for impounding them, and provide for taxing dogs and penalties for the nonpayment of such taxes, or the killing of dogs running at large in the corporate limits.  However, before exercising these powers, the board shall cause a resolution of intention to be recorded in minutes and then published in some daily or weekly newspaper at least two  
AZ - Ordinances - Lawful presence on private property defined (dogs)   AZ ST § 11-1026  

This Arizona statute provides that a person is lawfully on a dog owner's property when he or she is there as an invitee or guest, or when in the performance of a duty imposed upon him by law of the state or United States, or by ordinances of a municipality in which such property is located.

 
AZ - Pet Sales - Title 44. Trade and Commerce. Chapter 11. Regulations Concerning Particular Businesses. Article 17. Pet Dealers.   AZ ST 44-1799 - 1799.09   This Arizona statutory section comprises the state's pet shop laws.  The section requires that retail pet sellers provide purchasers a notice of rights that includes a statement of good health signed by a veterinarian.  Purchasers have fifteen days to return unhealthy or diseased dogs and receive a refund or compensation for reasonable veterinary expenses.  
AZ - Pet Trusts - Honorary trusts; trusts   AZ ST § 14-2907; AZ ST § 14-10408   This Arizona statute allows for the creation of a trust for a designated domestic or pet animal, and must be performed in 21 years or less.  The trust terminates when no living animal is covered by the trust; the remaining property is distributed according to statute and cannot be converted by the trustee.  
CA - Abandonment - § 597s. Abandonment of animals   CA PENAL § 597s   This statute makes it a misdemeanor to willfully abandon an animal, but does not apply to the release or rehabilitation and release of native California wildlife pursuant to statute or regulations of the California Department of Fish and Game.  
CA - Animal Control - Chapter 4. Animal Control   West's Ann.Cal.Health & Safety Code §§ 121875 - 121945   Beyond being domestic pets, dogs provide many services to humans, such as tracking scents and guarding facilities. Below is a collection of California laws, collectively known as the Dog Act, that set out definitions, requirements, and penalties relating to guard dogs, tracking dogs, narcotics dogs, sentry dogs and the people who handle them.  
CA - Assistance Animal - California Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   West's Ann. Cal. Penal Code § 600.2, 600.5, West's Ann. Cal. Civ. Code § 54 - 55.9; West's Ann.Cal.Educ.Code § 39839; West's Ann. Cal. Food & Agric. Code § 30850 - 30854; West's Ann. Cal. Health & Safety Code § 121680; West's Ann. Cal. Vehicle Code § 21963 ; West's Ann. Cal. Penal Code § 365.5 - 365.7  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
CA - Dangerous - California Dangerous Dog Statutes   West's Ann. Cal. Food & Agric. Code § 31601 - 31683; West's Ann. Cal. Civ. Code § 3342 - 3342.5; West's Ann. Cal. Health & Safety Code § 121685; West's Ann. Cal. Penal Code § 398 - 399.5   This is the California statute for the rules and regulations regarding dangerous and/or vicious dogs. It defines what constitutes a dangerous and/or vicious dog, what is to be done with said dog(s), and provides a model provision for municipalities to follow.  The other set of provisions contains the relevant dog bite law.  California has strict liability for dog bites such that liability is imposed regardless of the former viciousness of the dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.  
CA - Disaster - § 8608. California Animal Response Emergency System (CARES) program; incorporation into standardized emergency management system   CA GOVT § 8608   The California Emergency Management Agency is directed to approve, adopt, and incorporate the California Animal Response Emergency System (CARES) program into the standardized emergency management system.  
CA - Dog Fighting - § 597.5. Fighting dogs; felony; punishment; spectators; exceptions   CA PENAL § 597.5   This California statute provides that it is a felony to own, possess, keep, or train any dog, with the intent that the dog shall be engaged in an exhibition of fighting with another dog, or to cause dogs to fight for the purpose of amusement or gain.  Knowingly being a spectator at such an event constitutes a misdemeanor.  
CA - Dog, dangerous - § 31625. Seizure and impoundment pending hearing   West's Ann.Cal.Food & Agric.Code § 31625   This California statute allows an animal control officer or law enforcement officer to seize and impound the dog pending hearing if there is probable cause to believe the dog poses an immediate threat to public safety.  The owner or keeper of the dog shall be liable to the city or county where the dog is impounded for the costs and expenses of keeping the dog, if the dog is later adjudicated potentially dangerous or vicious.

 

 
CA - Dog, tether - § 122335. Animal control”, “agricultural operation”, “person”, and “reasonable period” defined; prohibition against tethering dog to stationary object; exceptions; penalty   CA HLTH & S § 122335   This California law is the state's dog tethering provision. Under the law, no person shall tether, fasten, chain, tie, or restrain a dog, or cause a dog to be tethered, fastened, chained, tied, or restrained, to a dog house, tree, fence, or any other stationary object. A person may tether, fasten, chain, or tie a dog, but it must be no longer than is necessary for the person to complete a temporary task that requires the dog to be restrained for a reasonable period. A person who violates this chapter is guilty of an infraction or a misdemeanor. An animal control may issue a correction warning to a person who violates this chapter, requiring the owner to correct the violation, in lieu of an infraction or misdemeanor, unless the violation endangers the health or safety of the animal, the animal has been wounded as a result of the activity.  
CA - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   West's Ann. Cal. Penal Code § 398 - 399.5, § 487e et seq, § 597b, § 597s, and § 597z; West's Ann. Cal. Health & Safety Code § 121575 et seq, § 121875 et seq., 122045 - 122315; West's Ann.Cal.Food & Agric.Code § 30501 - 31683; West's Ann. Cal. Fish & G. Code § 3960 - 3961; 3508; West's Ann. Cal. Gov. Code § 38792, § 25803; West's Ann. Cal. Civ. Code § 3340 - 3342.5   These statutes represent California's dog laws.  Included are provisions on county control of dogs, licensing, killing and seizure of dogs, and laws regarding dangerous or vicious dogs.  
CA - Domestic Violence - Inclusion of Animals; Domestic Violence   CA FAM § 6320 - 6327   On a showing of good cause, the court may include in a protective order a grant to the petitioner of the exclusive care, possession, or control of any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by either the petitioner or the respondent or a minor child residing in the residence or household of either the petitioner or the respondent.  
CA - Euthanasia - § 597u. Animals; prohibited killing methods   CA PENAL § 597u   This statute prohibits the use by any person of carbon monoxide gas or an intracardiac injection of a euthanasia agent on a conscious animal to kill an animal.
 
CA - Euthanasia - § 597v. Newborn dog or cat; methods of killing   CA PENAL § 597v   The statute prohibits the killing of a newborn dog or cat whose eyes have not yet opened by any other method than by the use of chloroform vapor or by inoculation of barbiturates.  
CA - Euthanasia - § 597w. Repealed by Stats.2005, c. 652 (A.B.1426), § 2   CA PENAL § 597w (repealed)   This repealed statute prohibited the killing of any dog or cat by the use of any high-altitude decompression chamber or nitrogen gas.  
CA - Euthanasia - § 599d. Policy of state regarding adoptable and treatable animals   CA PENAL § 599d  

This law provides that it is the policy of the state that no adoptable animal shall be euthanized.

 
CA - Euthanasia - § 599e. Killing unfit animals after notice by officer; offense of refusal to kill; killing by officer; exception   CA PENAL § 599e   This statute requires an owner of an animal deemed to be unfit for employment to kill the animal within 12 hours, after being notified by any peace officer, or be subject to criminal penalties.  
CA - Forfeiture - § 599aa. Seizure of fighting animals and birds, paraphernalia, etc.; affidavit of officer; custody of seized property; forfeiture and destruction or redelivery   CA PENAL § 599aa   This section provides for the seizure and forfeiture of all birds, animals, paraphernalia, and any other property which is used in the fighting of birds or animals, the training of birds or animals to fight, or to inflict pain or cruelty on fighting animals.  The section outlines the procedures for seizure and forfeiture, including what is to be done with seized animals.  
CA - Fur - § 598a. Killing dog or cat with intent of selling or giving away pelt; possession, sale or importation of pelt with intent of selling or giving away   CA PENAL § 598a   This statute makes it a misdemeanor to kill any dog or cat with the sole intent of selling or giving away the pelt of the animal.  It also makes it a misdemeanor to possess, import into California, sell, buy, give away or accept any pelt of a dog or cat with the sole intent of selling or giving away the pelt of the dog or cat.  
CA - Impound - Seizure and impoundment of dogs on private property   West's Ann. Cal. Gov. Code § 53074   This California statute provides that animal control officer shall not seize or impound a dog on its owner's property for violation of a leash ordinance or issue citations for the violation of such ordinance when the dog has not strayed from the owner's private property.  However, if the dog has strayed from the property and later returned to it, an officer may issue a citation if the owner is present or impound the dog if the owner is not present.  In the latter circumstance, the officer must leave a notice of impoundment at the residence.  
CA - Impound - § 597e. Domestic animals; impounding without sufficient food or water; supply by third party; collection of cost   CA PENAL § 597e   This statute requires anyone who impounds an animal to supply the animal with sufficient food and water.  It also states that if an animal is not provided with food and water, a person may enter the pound where the animal is being held, and provide it with food and water without being liable for the entry.  
CA - Impound - § 597t. Confined animals   CA PENAL § 597t   This statute requires an animal kept in an enclosed area be provided with an adequate exercise area.  It also states that if the animal is restricted by a leash, rope, or chain, the leash, rope, or chain shall be affixed in such a manner that it will prevent the animal from becoming entangled or injured and permit the animal's access to adequate shelter, food, and water.  
CA - Licenses - City dog license tags; compliance with division   CA FOOD & AG § 30502   This California statute provides that any dog tag issued pursuant to ordinance by a city or county will be valid provided it complies with this division, provides for the wearing of the license tag upon the collar of the dog, and provides for the keeping of a record which shall establish the identity of the person that owns or harbors the dog.   
CA - Lost Property - Lost and Unclaimed Property   CA CIVIL § 2080 - 2082   This statutory section comprises California's lost property laws.  
CA - Ordinances - Local regulations   CA BUS & PROF § 7582.5  

This California statute provides great deference to local municipalities by providing that regulations governing local municipalities shall not infringe upon the police powers of those local units to regulate dogs.  Specifically, it states that this chapter shall not prevent the local authorities in any city, county, or city and county, by ordinance and within the exercise of the police power of the city, county, or city and county from imposing reasonable additional requirements necessary to regulate and control protection dogs according to their local needs and not inconsistent with the provisions of this chapter.

 
CA - Ordinances - Regulation and control of dogs; maintenance of pound and rabies control programs; vaccination clinics; issuance of license, duration; disclosure of information   West's Ann. Cal. Health & Safety Code § 121690  

This California statute provides that, in rabies areas, every owner of dogs older than four months shall get a new dog license at least once every two years as provided by ordinance of the responsible city, city and county, or county.  Also, every dog owner shall, at intervals of time not more often than once a year, vaccinate his or her dog against rabies.  Any dog in violation of this chapter and any additional provisions that may be prescribed by any local governing body shall be impounded, as provided by local ordinance.

 
CA - Pet Sales - Chapter 5. Sale of Dogs and Cats   CA HLTH & S §§ 122045 - 122315   This section requires that dog breeders provide a written disclosure upon the sale of any dog with information such as the breeder’s name and address, the dog’s birth date, breed. sex, color, and vet record, and a signed statement from the breeder that the dog has no known diseases. Any breeder who knowingly sells a diseased dog faces a civil penalty. Breeders must provide dogs with sanitary housing, adequate food, water, exercise and veterinary care.  
CA - Pet Shop - Sale of dogs under eight weeks of age; written approval by veterinarian prior to physical transfer; violations; exclusions   CA PENAL § 597z   This new California law makes it a misdemeanor for any person to sell one or more dogs under eight weeks of age, unless, prior to any physical transfer of the dog or dogs from the seller to the purchaser, the dog or dogs are approved for sale, as evidenced by written documentation from a veterinarian licensed to practice in California.  
CA - Racing - § 597h. Live animals; attaching to power propelled device to be pursued by dogs   CA PENAL § 597h   This statute makes it unlawful to tie, attach, or fasten any live animal to any machine or device propelled by any power for the purpose of causing such animal to be pursued by a dog or dogs.  
CA - Service Animal - § 600. Horses or dogs used by peace officers; willful and malicious harm or interference; punishment; restitution   CA PENAL § 600   This statute makes it an offense to willfully, maliciously and with no legal justification harm, injure, obstruct, or interfere with a horse or dog under the supervision of law enforcement in the discharge of official duties. Violations are punishable by a fine and/or imprisonment. Punishment depends on the seriousness of the injury to the animal. Upon conviction, a defendant must also pay restitution for damages.  
CA - Service Animal - § 600.2. Allowing dog to injure or kill guide, signal or service dog; punishment; restitution   CA PENAL § 600.2   It is unlawful for any person to permit any dog he or she owns or controls to injure or kill any service dog while the service dog is in discharge of its duties. A violation is an infraction punishable by a fine if the injury is caused by the person's failure to exercise ordinary care. A violation is a misdemeanor if the injury is caused by reckless disregard in the exercise of control over his or her dog. A violation in this case shall be punishable by a fine and/or imprisonment. Upon conviction, the defendant shall make restitution, including veterinary bills and replacement costs.  
CA - Service Animal - § 600.5. Intentional injury to, or death of, guide, signal or service dog; penalty; restitution   CA PENAL § 600.5   Any person who intentionally causes injury to or the death of any service dog, while the dog is in discharge of its duties, is guilty of a misdemeanor. punishable by a fine and/or imprisonment. Upon conviction, a defendant must make restitution to the person with a disability who has custody or ownership of the dog for any veterinary bills and replacement costs of the dog if it is disabled or killed.  
CA - Slaughter - § 598b. Animals commonly kept as pets or companions; use as food; violation; exceptions   CA PENAL § 598b   This statute makes it a misdemeanor to possess, import into, or export from, California, sell, buy, give away, or accept any carcass of any animal commonly kept as a pet with the intent of using any part of that carcass for food.  It is also a misdemeanor to possess, import, export, buy, sell, give away or accept a common pet animal with the intent of killing it for food.
 
CA - Trusts - § 15212. Trusts for care of animals; duration; requirements; accountings; beneficiaries   CA PROBATE § 15212   This California statute provides that a person can create a trust for the care of a designated domestic or pet animal for the life of the animal.  The duration will only be for the life of the pet, even if the trust instrument contemplates a longer duration.  Note that the statute uses the singular form of "animal" and the term "domestic" or "pet" is used.  
CO - Assistance Animals - Colorado Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   CO ST § 18-13-107; § 24-34-801 - 804; § 42-4-808; § 18-1.3-602; § 18-9-202  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
CO - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty/Animal Fighting Statutes   CO ST § 18-9-201 - 209; § 35-42-101 - 115   This Colorado section contains the anti-cruelty and animal fighting laws. A person commits cruelty to animals if he or she knowingly, recklessly, or with criminal negligence overdrives, overloads, overworks, torments, deprives of necessary sustenance, unnecessarily or cruelly beats, allows to be housed in a manner that results in chronic or repeated serious physical harm, carries or confines in or upon any vehicles in a cruel or reckless manner, or otherwise mistreats or neglects any animal.  A person commits aggravated cruelty to animals if he or she knowingly tortures, needlessly mutilates, or needlessly kills an animal.  Cruelty to animals is a class 1 misdemeanor and aggravated cruelty or a second conviction of animal cruelty is class 6 felony.  This section also prohibits animal fighting (not limited to certain species such as dogs or chickens). Violation of this law results in a class 5 felony.  This section also makes it illegal to  own a dangerous dog and "tamper" with livestock.  
CO - Dangerous Dog- Article 9. Offenses Against Public Peace, Order, and Decency.   CO ST § 18-9-204.5; CO ST § 35-42-115   This Colorado statute defines a "dangerous dog" as one that has inflicted bodily or serious bodily injury upon or has caused the death of a person or domestic animal; or has demonstrated tendencies that would cause a reasonable person to believe that the dog may inflict injury upon or cause the death of any person or domestic animal; or has engaged in or been trained for animal fighting as described by statute.  Owners found guilty under the provisions will be subject to misdemeanor penalties if their dogs cause bodily injury or felonies if their dogs cause the death of a person. Section CO ST § 35-42-115 mandates that the bureau create a a statewide dangerous dog registry consisting of a database of information concerning microchip types and placement by veterinarians and licensed shelters in dangerous dogs.  
CO - Dog Bite - Civil actions against dog owners.   CO ST § 13-21-124  

This 2005 Colorado law makes a dog owner strictly liable for dog bites only if the victim of the bite suffers serious bodily injury or death from being bitten by a dog while lawfully on public or private property regardless of the viciousness or dangerous propensities of the dog or the dog owner's knowledge or lack of knowledge of the dog's viciousness or dangerous propensities.  Further, the victim is entitled to recover only economic damages (as opposed to noneconomic damages like pain and suffering, inconvenience, etc.)  in a civil suit against the dog owner.   Also, the statute provides that an owner is not liable where the victim is unlawfully on public or private property; where the victim is on the owner's property and the the property is clearly and conspicuously marked with one or more posted signs stating "no trespassing" or "beware of dog"; where the victim has clearly provoked the dog; where the victim is a veterinary health care worker, dog groomer, humane agency staff person, professional dog handler, trainer, or dog show judge acting in the performance of his or her respective duties; or where the dog is working as a hunting dog, herding dog, farm or ranch dog, or predator control dog on the property of or under the control of the dog's owner.

 
CO - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   CO ST § 35-43-126; § 13-21-124; § 25-4-601 to 615; § 30-15-101 to 105; § 33-3-106; § 33-4-101.3; § 33-6-128; § 35-42.5-101   These Colorado statutes represent the state's dog laws. There are provisions regarding civil actions against dog owners for dog bites, rabies control, animal control and licensing, and pertinent wildlife regulations, such as a general ban on harassing wildlife and destroying dens or nests. However, there is an exception making it permissible to take wildlife when it is causing excessive damage to property.
 
CO - Domestic Violence - Animals and Domestic Violence; Definition.   CO ST § 18-6-800.3   This statute includes within the definition of "domestic violence" any other crime against a person, or against property, including an animal, or any municipal ordinance violation against a person, or against property, including an animal, when used as a method of coercion, control, punishment, intimidation, or revenge directed against a person with whom the actor is or has been involved in an intimate relationship.  
CO - Exotic - Article 81. Hybrid Animals   CO ST § 35-81-101 to 102   This Colorado statute authorized the commissioner of the department of agriculture to appoint and convene an advisory group to study the behavior of hybrid canids (wolf hybrids) and felines, including a review of any incidents involving property damage and personal injury caused by such animals. The department was to present its findings and proposals for legislation in January of 1998.  
CO - Impound - Article 4. Disease Control   CO ST § 25-4-610   This Colorado statute provides that it is unlawful for any owner of any dog, cat, other pet animal, or other mammal which has not been inoculated as required by the order of the county board of health or board of health of a health department to allow it to run at large. The health department or health officer may capture and impound any such dog, cat, other pet animal.  
CO - Impound - Colorado Pet Animal Care and Facilities Act   CO ST § 35-80-106.3  

This is an example of a state statute that creates minimum holding periods that shelters must hold found pets for before allowing the pets to be adopted or otherwise disposed of.

 
CO - Liability for accident or subsequent disease from impoundment- Article 15. Regulation Under Police Power.   CO ST § 30-15-104   This Colorado statute immunizes the board of county commissioners or other local governing entity from liability associated with the impoundment of pet animals.  Specifically, it states the board or anyone authorized to enforce a local ordinance shall not be held responsible for any accident or subsequent disease that may occur to the animal in connection with the administration of the resolution or ordinance.  
CO - Ordinances - Animal control officers--Article 15. Regulation Under Police Power.   CO ST § 30-15-105   This Colorado statute provides that personnel engaged in animal control may issue citations or summonses and complaints enforcing the county dog control resolution or any other county resolution concerning the control of pet animals or municipal ordinance.  Officers assigned to this capacity may be referred to as "peace officers."  
CO - Ordinances - Pet animal control and licensing   CO ST § 30-15-101   This Colorado statute states that the board of county commissioners of any county may adopt a resolution for the control and licensing of dogs.  These regulations may require licensing of dogs by owners, require that dogs and other pet animals be under control at all times and define "control," define "vicious dog" and "vicious animal," establish a dog pound, or other animal holding facility, provide for the impoundment of animals which are vicious, not under control, or otherwise not in conformity with the resolutions, and establish such other reasonable regulations and restrictions for the control of dogs and other pet animals.  
CO - Pet Shop - Article 80. Pet Animal Care and Facilities Act   CO ST § 35-80-101 to 117   This Colorado Act regulates pet animal facilities (i.e., shelters, large kennels, and breeders).  The Act covers licensing of the facilities and those activities deemed unlawful, such as selling a kitten or puppy under the age of 8 weeks and refusing a lawful inspection.  
CO - Police Training - Dog Protection Act   C.R.S.A. § 29-5-112   This Colorado statute requires local law enforcement to undergo training in order to prevent the shooting of dogs by local law enforcement officers in the line of duty. Specifically, this statute aims to assist in training officers to differentiate between threatening and non-threatening dog behaviors, as well as to employ non-lethal means whenever possible.  
CO - Trusts for Pets - Article 11. Intestate Succession and Wills.   CO ST § 15-11-901   This Colorado statute provides that trust for the care of designated domestic or pet animals and the animals' offspring in gestation is valid.  The determination of the "animals' offspring in gestation" is made at the time the designated domestic or pet animals become present beneficiaries of the trust. Unless the trust instrument provides for an earlier termination, the trust terminates when no living animal is covered by the trust (but no longer than 21 years).  The trust property then transfers as provided by statute, but the trustee may not covert the trust property.  
CO - Veterinary - Article 29.3. Uniform Emergency Volunteer Health Practitioners Act   CO ST § 12-29.3-101 to 113   The Uniform Emergency Volunteer Health Practitioners Act applies to registered volunteer health practitioners and who provide health or veterinary services for a host entity during an emergency.  
CT - Assistance Animals - Connecticut Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   CT ST § 46a-42; § 46a-44; § 46a-64; § 53-330a; § 22-345; § 22-364b  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
CT - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   CT ST § 22-327 - § 22-367a; CT ST § 26-107  

These Connecticut statutes comprise the state's dog law.  Among the provisions include licensing, kennel, and rabies regulations.  With regard to damage by dogs, the law provides a form of strict liability that states if any dog does any damage to either the body or property of any person, the owner or keeper shall be liable for such damage, except when such damage has been occasioned to the body or property of a person who, at the time such damage was sustained, was committing a trespass or other tort, or was teasing, tormenting or abusing such dog.  The law also contains a unique "dogs on highway" provision that provides that any person owning or having the custody of any dog which habitually goes out on any highway and growls, bites, or snaps at, or otherwise annoys, any person or domestic animal lawfully using such highway or chases or interferes with any motor vehicle so using such highway, shall be guilty of a class D misdemeanor.  Further, among the nuisance provisions, the law states that no person shall own or harbor a dog which is a nuisance by reason of vicious disposition or excessive barking or other disturbance. These laws also contain provisions on reporting neglected or cruelly treated animals.  Finally, Connecticut has an anti-ear cropping measures that prohibits cropping by anyone who is not a registered veterinary surgeon, and who performs the operation when the dog is under an anesthetic.

 
CT - Evacuation of Animals During Disasters - Chapter 517. Civil Preparedness. Department of Emergency Management and Homeland Security   CT ST § 28-1   In Connecticut, “civil preparedness” includes activities designed to minimize the effects upon the civilian population in the event of major disaster or emergency. Such measures include the nonmilitary evacuation of the civilian population, pets and service animals.  
CT - Leash - Control of dogs in proximity to guide dogs.   CT ST § 22-364b   This Connecticut law provides that the owner or keeper of a dog shall restrain and control such dog on a leash when such dog is not on the property of its owner or keeper and is in proximity to a blind, deaf or mobility impaired person accompanied by his or her guide dog.  Any person who violates the provisions of this section shall have committed an infraction. If an owner or keeper of a dog violates the provisions of this section and, as a result of such violation, such dog attacks and injures the guide dog, such owner or keeper shall be liable for any damage done to such guide dog, including veterinary care, replacement of the dog, and attorney fees.  
CT - Lost Property - Lost and Unclaimed Property   CT ST § 50-1 to 14   This statutory section comprises Connecticut's lost property statutes.  
CT - Spay and Neuter - Chapter 436A. Animal Population Control   CT ST §§ 22-380a - 380m   This set of Connecticut laws provides the state's dog and cat sterilization laws. Under the section, no pound is allowed to sell or give away any unspayed or unneutered dog or cat to any person unless such pound receives $45 from the person buying or adopting such dog or cat. These funds are paid quarterly by the municipality into the animal population control account established under section 22-380g. At the time of receipt of such payment, the pound shall provide a voucher, for the purpose of sterilization and vaccination benefits to the person buying or adopting such dog or cat. The chapter also provides the procedure for a veterinarian to participate in the program and the method by which he or she would be paid. Further, the law states that a town clerk may collect an additional $6 for each license issued pursuant to section 22-338 for an unspayed or unneutered dog.  
CT - Transportation of dogs in pick-up trucks - Chapter 248. Vehicle Highway Use   CT ST § 14-272b   This Connecticut law prohibits any person from transporting a dog in the open bed of a pick-up truck unless the dog is secured in a cage or other container to prevent it from jumping out of the truck.  
DC - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes   DC ST § 22-1001 - 1015   This D.C. statutory section comprises the anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions.  Whoever knowingly overdrives, overloads, drives when overloaded, overworks, tortures, torments, deprives of necessary sustenance, cruelly chains, cruelly beats or mutilates, any animal, or knowingly causes such acts, or one who unnecessarily fails to provide proper food, drink, air, light, space, veterinary care, shelter, or protection from the weather, faces imprisonment up to180 days, or a fine of $250, or both.  Actions that result in serious bodily injury or death to the animal result in felony prosecution with imprisonment not exceeding 5 years or a fine of $25,000, or both.  "Animal" is defined by statute as all living and sentient creatures (human beings excepted).  This section also prohibits animal fighting as either a felony (i.e., wagering or conducting the fight) or a misdemeanor (knowingly being present).  
DC - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws and Dangerous Dog Provision   DC ST § 8-1801 - 1813; § 8-1821.01- .02; § 8-1831.01; 8-1841.01 - .09; 8-1901 - 1908  

These District of Columbia statutes make up the dog laws for the District.  Included among the provisions are definitions, animal control and at large provisions, and vaccinations/licensing regulations.  With regard to dangerous dogs, the term "dangerous animal" means an animal that because of specific training or demonstrated behavior threatens the health or safety of the public.  The Mayor may impound any animal at large or any dangerous animal.  If a dog injures a person while at large, lack of knowledge of the dog's vicious propensity standing alone shall not absolve the owner from a finding of negligence.

 
DE - Assistance Animal - Delaware's Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   9 Del.C. § 902, 916; 16 Del.C. § 9501 - 9506; 21 Del.C. § 4144; 6 Del.C. § 4501 - 456; 31 Del.C. § 2117  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
DE - Dangerous - Delaware Dangerous Dog Laws   DE ST TI 9 § 920 - 928 (formerly DE ST TI 7 § 1730 - 40)   These Delaware statutes comprise the state's dangerous dog laws.  Among the provisions includes the mandatory seizure of dogs who have chased or pursued persons on bicycles twice in a twelve-month period or those that have killed or inflicted serious injury on people or other domestic animals.  However, no dog shall be considered dangerous or potentially dangerous if a person was, at the time the injury was sustained, committing criminal trespass or other tort upon premises occupied by the owner of the dog, or was teasing, tormenting, abusing or assaulting the dog, or was committing or attempting to commit a crime.  An owner who violates the provisions regarding ownership of dangerous dogs faces graduated fines based on the conduct at issue.  
DE - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   DE ST TI 9 § 901 - 919; DE ST TI 9 § 920 - 928; DE ST TI 3 § 8201 - 8213; DE ST TI 3 § 8214 - 8225; DE ST TI 6 § 4001 - 4011; DE ST TI 7 § 1701 - 1740;   These statutes comprise Delaware's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning hunting field trials, and the dangerous dog subchapter.  
DE - Fur - An Act to Amend Title 11 of the Delaware Code Relating to the Unlawful Trade of Dog or Cat Byproducts (Senate Bill 374)   Senate Bill 374 (2000)  

This Act prohibits the sale or barter of dog or cat fur or hair, and any products made therefrom, and prohibits the sale or barter of dog or cat flesh, and any products made therefrom for human consumption.

 
DE - Fur - Chapter 5. Specific Offenses   DE ST TI 11 § 1325A   In Delaware, a person is guilty of the unlawful trade in dog or cat by-products in the 2nd degree if the person knowingly or recklessly sells, barters or offers for sale or barter, the fur or hair of a domestic dog or cat or any product made in whole or in part from the fur or hair of a domestic dog or cat. The unlawful trade in dog or cat by-products in the 2nd degree is a class B misdemeanor. A person is guilty of the unlawful trade in dog or cat by-products in the 1st degree if the person knowingly or recklessly sells, barters or offers for sale or barter, the flesh of a domestic dog or cat or any product made in whole or in part from the flesh of a domestic dog or cat. The unlawful trade in dog or cat by-products in the first degree is a class A misdemeanor.  
DE - Ordinances - Local ordinances (dogs)   DE ST TI 7 § 1740  

(Repealed). This Delaware statutes provides that nothing shall prevent a local municipality from enacting measures or a program for the control of dangerous or potentially dangerous dogs.  

 
DE - Pet Sales - CHAPTER 40. PET WARRANTIES   DE ST TI 6 § 4001 - 4011   This Delaware statutory section comprises the state's "pet warranty" laws.  Purchasers receive a statement of the dog's breed and any registration information when buying pets from a retail pet store under the law.  Sellers are required to disclose any known disease or illness at the time of sale.  Further, sellers must provide the following written statement when selling a registered pet:  "A pedigree or a registration does not assure proper breeding condition, health, quality or claims to lineage."  Buyers may receive a refund or replacement, or have veterinary expenses reimbursed by a seller where a dog becomes ill or dies within 20 days of purchase (or within two years for a congenital disorder).  
DE - Property - § 910. Dogs deemed personal property; theft; penalty.   9 Del.C. § 910 (formerly 7 Del.C. § 1708)   Dogs are considered personal property in Delaware.  
DE - Rabies - Subchapter I. Rabies Control in Animal and Human Populations   DE ST TI 3 § 8201 - 8213   The purpose of this chapter is to control and suppress the spread of rabies among the domestic and wild animal populations of Delaware. Any person owning a dog 6 months of age or older in this State shall have that dog vaccinated against rabies by a veterinarian. Any person owning a cat 6 months of age or older in this State shall have the cat vaccinated against rabies by a veterinarian. Any person owning a ferret 6 months of age or older in this State shall have the ferret vaccinated against rabies by a veterinarian.  
DE - Spay, Neuter and Feral Cat - Subchapter II. Animal Population Control Program and Spay/Neuter Fund   DE ST TI 3 § 8214 - 8225   This chapter represents Delaware's Animal Population Control Program. The section beings with findings from a 2002 study of how many dogs and cats were reclaimed, adopted out, or euthanized. It also has a definitional section that includes a definition for "feral cat." The chapter also describes its funding base and what parties are qualified to receive assistance under the Spay/Neuter Fund. Effective on June 29, 2006, it became mandatory for all cats and/or dogs of reproductive age to be spayed or neutered and inoculated for rabies prior to adoption from any private animal rescue groups and animal shelters.  
DE - Tether, dog - Chapter 9. Dogs.   DE ST TI 9 § 904   This Delaware statute addresses the requirements for indoor and outdoor facilities housing dogs. It includes storage, drainage, waste disposal, ventilation, lighting, shelter, height, and surface requirements. Food, water, and use of tethers are also addressed.  
FL - Assistance Animal - Florida's Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   West's F. S. A. § 413.08 - 081; West's F. S. A. § 316.1303  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
FL - Dangerous Dog - CHAPTER 767. DAMAGE BY DOGS.   FL ST 767.14   This Florida statute provides that nothing in the dangerous dog act limits the ability of local governments from enacting restrictions on dangerous dogs more severe than the state law, as long as the regulations are not breed-specific.  
FL - Disaster - 252.3568. Emergency sheltering of persons with pets   FL ST § 252.3568   In Florida, there must be strategies for the evacuation of persons with pets in the state and local comprehensive emergency management plans.  
FL - Dogs - Florida Dog /Dangerous Dog Laws   FL ST §§ 767.01 - 16; § 705.19; § 823.041; § 823.15   These Florida statutes outline the state's dog provisions, which mainly cover dangerous dog/dog bite laws.  The owner of any dog that bites any person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, is liable for damages suffered by persons bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of the dog or the owners' knowledge of such viciousness.  However, any negligence on the part of the person bitten that is a proximate cause of the biting incident reduces the liability of the owner of the dog by the percentage that the bitten person's negligence contributed to the biting incident.  If a dog that has previously been declared dangerous attacks or bites a person or a domestic animal without provocation, the owner is guilty of a misdemeanor of the first degree.  The dog will be impounded for a period of ten days during which time the owner of the dog may request a hearing.  
FL - Fur - Sale of garments or items of clothing containing dog or cat fur prohibited; sale of pelt of any dog or cat prohibited; penalty.   FL ST § 828.1231   Makes it illegal for a person to knowingly sell or offer to sell a garment which contains dog or cat fur, or a dog or cat pelt.  Defines the first violation of this provision as a misdemeanor of the first degree, and any subsequent violations as felonies of the third degree.  Allows any law enforcement agency or humane officer to enforce this provision and to seek a civil penalty up to $5,000 for each violation.  
FL - Ordinances - Interpretation of Dog Ordinances under Dangerous Dogs   FL ST § 767.07   This Florida statute provides that the statutory section relating to state regulation of dangerous dogs is supplemental to all other state laws affecting dogs and shall not be construed to modify those laws or to prevent municipalities from prohibiting, licensing, or regulating the running at large of dogs within their respective limits by law or ordinance.  
FL - Sterilization - Chapter 823. Public Nuisances   FL ST § 823.15   This Florida law declares that it is the public policy of the state that every feasible means be used to reduce the incidence of birth of unneeded and unwanted puppies and kittens.  In furtherance of this policy, provision shall be made for the sterilization of all dogs and cats sold or released for adoption from any public or private animal shelter or animal control agency by either providing sterilization by a licensed veterinarian before relinquishing custody of the animal or entering into a written agreement with the adopter or purchaser guaranteeing that sterilization will be performed within 30 days or prior to sexual maturity. All costs of sterilization pursuant to this section shall be paid by the prospective adopter unless otherwise provided for by ordinance of the local governing body or provided for by the humane society governing body.  
GA - Assistance Animal - Georgia's Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   GA ST § 30-4-2 to 4; GA ST § 40-6-94; GA ST § 16-12-120; GA ST § 16-11-107.1  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
GA - Bite - § 51-2-6. Dogs, liability of owner or keeper for injuries to livestock   GA ST § 51-2-6 to 7   This Georgia statute represents the state's relevant dog bite strict liability law.  While the law imposes strict liability for injury to a person, the dog (or other animal) must first be considered "vicious" or "dangerous," which can be as simple as showing the animal was required to be leashed per city ordinance.  Second, the animal must be at large by the careless management of the owner.  Finally, the person injured must not have provoked the animal into attacking him or her.  
GA - Dangerous Dog Ordinances - Chapter 8. Dogs   GA ST § 4-8-29   This Georgia statute states the standards and requirements for the control of dangerous dogs and vicious dogs; this statute also proscribes penalties for violations of these standards and requirements. For instance, a violation of this article is a misdemeanor of high and aggravated nature; repeated violations of this article is a felony.  
GA - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   GA ST § 4-8-1 to 45; GA ST § 4-14-1 to 4-15-1; GA ST § 27-3-16 to 18   These Georgia statutes comprise the state's dog laws and the "Responsible Dog Ownership Law.".  Among the provisions of the Responsible Dog Ownership Law include a requirement for registration of dangerous dogs as well as the necessity of such owner to carry at least $50,000 in liability insurance.  Owners of these dogs who do not comply with these and other provisions may have their dogs confiscated and destroyed. Any person who violates this article is guilty of a misdemeanor.  
GA - Dogfighting - Article 2. Gambling and Related Offenses.   GA ST § 16-12-37  

Georgia's dogfighting statute states that any person who owns, possesses, trains, transports, or sells any dog with the intent that such dog shall be engaged in fighting with another dog, wagers money or anything of value on the result of such dogfighting, knowingly permits dogfighting on his or her premises, knowingly promotes or advertises an exhibition of fighting commits the offense of dogfighting. Violation of the law is a felony, with a mandatory fine of $5,000.00 or a mandatory fine of $5,000.00 in addition to imprisonment for not less than one year nor more than five years. On a second or subsequent conviction, such person shall be punished by imprisonment of not less than one nor more than ten years, a fine of not less than $15,000.00, or both such fine and imprisonment. Any person who is knowingly present only as a spectator at any place for the fighting of dogs shall, upon a first conviction thereof, be guilty of a misdemeanor of a high and aggravated nature.  

 
GA - Ordinances - Jurisdiction and duties of local governments   GA ST § 4-8-22   This Georgia statute provides authority for local governing units to enforce this article. This statute further establishes that the local government shall designate an individual as a dog control officer to aid in the administration and enforcement of the provisions of this article; the dog control officer does not have the authority to make arrests unless the person is a law enforcement officer. Additionally, this article also allows local governments to make arrangements with each other for consolidation of dog control services.  
HI - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   HI ST § 711-1109.4; § 711-1109.5; § 143-4; § 347-13 - 20  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
HI - Disaster; Accomodations for Pets - Chapter 128. Civil Defense and Emergency Act.   HRS § 128-10.5 (2006)   In Hawaii, the governor shall prescribe rules to establish criteria, requirements, conditions, and limitations for providing accommodations to shelter pet animals. The director of civil defense must identify public and private shelters that are suitable to shelter pets.  
HI - Dog - General Dog Provisions   HI ST § 143-1 to 19; HI ST § 183D-65   This Hawaii statute provides the pertinent regulations for dogs in the state.  Included in its provisions are licensing, impoundment, seizure of loose or unlicensed dogs, and stray animals.  Of particular note is a provision that makes it unlawful for any officer to knowingly sell or give any impounded dog to any person, firm, corporation, association, medical college, or university for the purpose of animal experimentation.  
HI - Dog Bite - Chapter 142. Animals, Brands, and Fences.   HI ST § 142-75   This Hawaii statute provides that the owner of any dog that has bitten a human being shall have the duty to take such reasonable steps as are necessary to prevent the recurrence of such incident.  Whenever a dog has bitten a human being on at least two separate occasions (with no applicable exceptions), any person may bring an action against the owner of the dog.  Each county may enact and enforce ordinances regulating persons who own, harbor, or keep any dog that has bitten, injured, or maimed a person.  No ordinance enacted under this subsection shall be held invalid on the ground that it covers any subject or matter embraced within any statute or rule of the State; provided that the ordinance shall not affect the civil liability of a person owning the offending dog.   
HI - Dog Bite - Chapter 142. Animals, Brands, and Fences.   HI ST § 142-74 - § 142-75   Hawaii statute provides that if any dog, while on private property without the consent of the owner of that property, injures or destroys any sheep, cattle, goat, hog, fowl, or other property belonging to any person other than the owner of the dog, the owner of the dog shall be liable in damages to the person injured for the value of the property so injured or destroyed.  Further, each county may enact and enforce ordinances regulating persons who own, harbor, or keep any dog that has injured, maimed, or destroyed an animal belonging to another person.  
HI - Dog Bite - CHAPTER 663. TORT ACTIONS.   HI ST § 663-9 - § 663-9.1   This statute represents Hawaii's relevant dog bite law.  Under the statute, an owner or harborer of an animal is strictly liable for personal or property damage to any person, regardless of the animal owner's or harborer's lack of scienter of the vicious or dangerous propensities of the animal.  
HI - Impound - Chapter 143. Animals: Licenses and Regulations.   HI ST § 143-8   This Hawaii statute provides that, except where licensing requirements are dispensed with, every officer shall seize any unlicensed dog found running at large or found outside a sufficient enclosure even if within the immediate presence of its owner.  The animal will then be confined at a pound for forty-eight hours whereupon it can be redeemed by the owner, sold, or humanely destroyed if not reclaimed.  Each county council shall have the power to fix the impoundment fee for dogs.     
IA - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   I. C. A. § 216C.1 - 11; 321.333  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
IA - Dog - Iowa Dangerous Dog/General Dog Laws   IA ST 351.1 - .43   These Iowa statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  With regard to damage done by dogs and dog bites, the owner of a dog shall be liable to an injured party for all damages done by the dog, when the dog is caught in the action of worrying, maiming, or killing a domestic animal, or the dog is attacking or attempting to bite a person, except when the party damaged is doing an unlawful act, directly contributing to the injury.  Further, the law states that it shall be the duty of the owner of any dog, cat or other animal which has bitten or attacked a person or any person having knowledge of such bite or attack to report this act to a local health or law enforcement official.  The section also contains general rabies vaccination provisions and a prohibition on dogs running at large (results in impoundment).  
IA - Dog as property - CHAPTER 351. DOGS AND OTHER ANIMALS.   IA ST § 351.25  

This Iowa statute distinguishes between licensed and unlicensed dogs.  Specifically, it provides that all dogs under six months of age, and all dogs over said age and wearing a collar with a valid rabies vaccination tag attached to the collar, shall be deemed property. Dogs not provided with a rabies vaccination tag shall not be deemed property.

 
IA - Dog License - Chapter 351. Dogs and Other Animals.   IA ST § 351.27  

This Iowas statute makes it lawful for any person to kill a dog, wearing a collar with a rabies vaccination tag attached, when the dog is caught in the act of worrying, chasing, maiming, or killing any domestic animal or fowl, or when such dog is attacking or attempting to bite a person.

 
IA - Dog Licenses - Chapter 351. Dogs and Other Animals.   IA ST § 351.26  

This Iowa statute makes it lawful for any person to kill a dog that is required to wear a rabies vaccination tag and is found not wearing one.  Further, it is the duty of all peace officers within their respective jurisdictions unless such jurisdiction has provided for the seizure and impoundment of dogs, to kill these untagged dogs.

 
IA - Impoundment - CHAPTER 351. DOGS AND OTHER ANIMALS.   IA ST § 351.37   This Iowa statute provides that a dog shall be impounded by a local board of health or law enforcement official if the dog is running at large and the dog is not wearing a valid rabies vaccination tag.  The statute requires that written notice be sent to the owner (if the owner's name can be reasonably determined from a tag or other source) who then has seven days to redeem the dog before it is euthanized.  
IA - Lost Property - Chapter 556F. Lost Property   IA ST § 556F.1 - 18  

This section comprises Iowa's Lost Property Act.

 
IA - Ordinances - CHAPTER 351. DOGS AND OTHER ANIMALS   IA ST § 351.36  

This Iowa statute provides that local health and law enforcement officials shall enforce state provisions relating to vaccination and impoundment of dogs.  It further states that such public officials shall not be responsible for any accident or disease of a dog resulting from the enforcement of the provisions of the sections.

 
IA - Ordinances - Chapter 351. Dogs and Other Animals.   IA ST § 351.41  

This Iowa state provides that the chapter relating to state dogs running at large laws does not limit the power of any city or county to prohibit dogs and other animals from running at large, whether or not they have been vaccinated for rabies, and does not limit the power of any city or county to provide additional measures for the restriction of dogs and other animals for the control of rabies and for other purposes.

 
IA - Ordinances - Duties relating to services   IA ST § 331.381  

This Iowa statute states that the county board shall provide for the seizure, impoundment, and disposition of dogs in accordance with chapter 351.

 
IA - Trusts for Pets - Chapter 633A. Iowa Trust Code.   IA ST § 633A.2101   This Iowa statute allows for the creation of a trust for the continuing care of animal living at the settlor's death (note that the actual text does not state "domestic" or "pet" animal).  This type of trust, allowed generally through the provisions for lawful noncharitable trusts, is valid for up to twenty-one years, whether or not the terms of the trust contemplates a longer duration.  The trust terminates when when no living animal is covered by its terms.  
ID - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   ID ST § 18-5811 - 5812B; ID ST § 56-701 - 707  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
ID - Dangerous - § 25-2806. Liability for livestock and poultry killed by dogs   ID ST § 25-2806   This Idaho statute provides that any owner whose dog that kills, worries, or wounds any livestock and poultry is liable to the owner of the same for the damages and costs of suit, to be recovered before any court of competent jurisdiction.  Further, any person, on finding any dog, not on the premises of its owner or possessor, worrying, wounding, or killing any livestock or poultry may, at the time of so finding said dog, kill the same, without liability for damages.  
ID - Dangerous Dogs running at large - Chapter 28. Dogs.   ID ST § 25-2805   This Idaho statute provides that any person who lets his or her dog run at large after a complaint has been made to the sheriff shall be guilty of an infraction punishable as provided in section 18-113A, Idaho Code.  Any person who lets his or her dog physically attack someone when not provoked shall be guilty of a misdemeanor in addition to any liability as provided in section 25-2806, Idaho Code.  For a second or subsequent violation of this subsection, the court may, in the interest of public safety, order the owner to have the vicious dog destroyed or may direct the appropriate authorities to destroy the dog.  
ID - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   ID ST § 25-2801 - 2808; ID ST § 36-1101   These Idaho statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws regarding dogs at large and vicious dogs, and immunity for acts done by law enforcement dogs.  
ID - Dog License - Chapter 28. Dogs.   ID ST § 25-2804   This Idaho statute provides that once a county board adopts a measure, sixty (60) days from the date of the board's meeting at which this measure is adopted, it shall be the duty of the sheriff of the county to seize and impound all unlicensed dogs at large, excluding those located in a municipality that has enacted a dog license law.  A dog impounded under this provision may be killed in a humane manner after 5 days after there has been a "reasonable effort" to locate the owner.  
ID - Dog, property - Chapter 28. Dogs.   ID ST § 25-2807   This Idaho statute states that dogs are considered property.  It further provides that no entity of state or local government may by ordinance or regulation prevent the owner of any dog from protecting it from loss by the use of an electronic locating collar.  
IL - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   510 ILCS 70/2.01c, 4.03, 4.04; 510 ILCS 5/15.1; 740 ILCS 13/1 - 10; 775 I.L.C.S. 30/1 - 6; IL ST CH 105 § 5/14-6.02; IL ST CH 625 § 60/15; IL ST CH 775 § 5/3-104.1  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
IL - Disaster - Illinois Emergency Management Agency Act. 3305/4. Definitions.   IL ST CH 20 § 3305/4 (2006)   The Illinois' Illinois Emergency Management Agency Act defines “Emergency Operations Plan” as the written plan of the State and political subdivisions describing the organization, mission, and functions of the government and supporting services for responding to and recovering from disasters and shall include plans that take into account the needs of those individuals with household pets and service animals following a major disaster or emergency.
 
IL - Dog Bite - Chapter 510. Animals   IL ST CH 510 § 5/13   This Illinois statute provides the health procedure for dog bites.  When a state health administrator receives information that any person has been bitten by an animal, the administrator shall have such dog or other animal confined under the observation of a licensed veterinarian for a period of 10 days.  People with knowledge of dog bites are required to inform the administrator or his or her representative promptly.  It is unlawful for the owner of the animal to euthanize, sell, give away, or otherwise dispose of any animal known to have bitten a person, until it is released by the administrator.  
IL - Dog Fighting - Chapter 720. Criminal Offenses   IL ST CH 720 § 5/26-5; renumberedIL ST CH 720§ 5/48-1   The following statute comprises Illinois' dogfighting law.  Under the law, it is a felony to promote or instigate a fight, or to train or sell a dog for dogfighting purposes.  Further, no person may solicit a minor to violate this Section. Providing equipment or aiding in providing equipment for a fight is also a felony.  Knowingly attending a dogfight is a Class 4 felony for a first violation. A second or subsequent violation of subsection (g) of this Section is a Class 3 felony.  
IL - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   510 ILCS 5/1 - 35; 510 ILCS 92/1 - 999; 720 I.L.C.S. 630/0.01 - 1; 510 ILCS 72/1 - 180; 740 I.L.C.S. 13/1 - 10; 55 I.L.C.S. 5/5-1071 - 1071.1; 60 I.L.C.S. 1/30-110; 520 I.L.C.S. 20/15 and 20/19; 520 I.L.C.S. 5/2.34; 105 I.L.C.S. 5/14-6.02; 65 I.L.C.S. 5/11-20-9; 520 I.L.C.S. 5/1.2y, 2z; 520 I.L.C.S. 5/3.26   These statutes comprise Illinois' dog laws.  Among the provisions include the Animal Control Act, which regulates the licensing and control of dogs, the Diseased Animal Act, and the Humane Euthanasia in Animal Shelters Act.  
IL - Ordinances - 5/24. Powers of municipalities and other political subdivisions to regulate dogs and other animals   IL ST CH 510 § 5/24   This Illinois statute provides that nothing in the Animal Control Act shall be held to limit the power of any municipality to prohibit animals from running at large, nor shall anything in this Act be construed to limit the power of any municipality to further control and regulate dogs, cats or other animals in such municipality or other political subdivision provided that no regulation or ordinance is specific to breed .  
IL - Ordinances - 5/5. Duties and powers   IL ST CH 510 § 5/5   This Illinois statute outlines the local animal control duties of the Administrator related to sterilization, humane education, rabies inoculation, stray control, impoundment, quarantine, and any other means deemed necessary, to control and prevent the spread of rabies and to exercise dog and cat overpopulation control.  It also states that counties may by ordinance determine the extent of the police powers that may be exercised by the Administrator, Deputy Administrators, and Animal Control Wardens and which powers shall pertain only to this Act.  
IL - Ordinances - 5/7. Remittance of fees; Animal Control Fund; use of fund; self-insurance   IL ST CH 510 § 5/7   This Illinois statute provides that all registration fees collected shall be remitted the county Animal Control Fund. This fund shall be set up for the purpose of paying costs of the Animal Control Program.  This includes paying claims for loss of livestock or poultry and for other ordinance enacted measures, including the purchase of human rabies anti-serum, human vaccine, the cost for administration of serum or vaccine, minor medical care; paying the cost of stray dog control, impoundment, education on animal control and rabies; or any county or municipal ordinance as established by ordinance of the County Board. In 2013, the statute was amended to provide different provisions for how the fund shall be used for cities with 3 million or more people and for cities with less than 3 million people.  
IL - Pet Shops - Chapter 225. Professions and Occupations.   IL ST CH 225 § 605/1 - 22   This section comprises Illinois' Animal Welfare Act.  The Act is primarily aimed at regulating commercial pet dealers, such as kennels, breeders, and retail pet shops.  The provisions include restrictions on the age at which both dogs and cats can be separated from their mothers (8 weeks).  
IL - Service Animal - Chapter 740. Civil Liabilities.   IL ST CH 740 § 13/1 - 10   Under this Illinois statute, a physically impaired person may bring an action for both economic and noneconomic damages against a person who steals, injures, or attacks his or her assistance animal with hazardous chemicals (provided he or she reasonably knew the guide dog was present and the chemical was hazardous).  The economic damages recoverable include veterinary medical expenses, replacement costs, and temporary replacement assistance (provided by person or animal).  No cause of action lies where the physically impaired person was committing a civil or criminal trespass at the time of the attack or theft.  
IN - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   IN ST 9-21-17-21; 16-32-3-1 - 5; 22-9-6-5; 22-9-5-9.5; 22-9-5-20; 35-46-3-11.5; 3-11-9-5   These statutes comprise Indiana's assistance animal/guide dog laws.  
IN - Bite - Indiana Dog Bite Laws   IN ST 15-20-1-1 - 7; IN ST 35-47-7-4   These Indiana statutes provide the state's dog bite laws.  If a dog, without provocation, bites any person who is peaceably conducting himself in any place where he may be required to go for the purpose of discharging any duty imposed upon him by the laws of this state or by the laws or postal regulations of the United States of America, the owner of such dog may be held liable for any damages suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.  It also establishes the conditions under which an owner will be criminally liable if his or her dog bites another person.  In Indiana, physicians treating dog bite injuries are required to report such injuries not more than 72-hours after the incident.  
IN - Breeder - Article 21. Commercial Dog Breeder Regulation   IN ST 15-21-1-1 to 15-21-7-1   This set of Indiana commercial dog breeder laws goes into effect on January 1, 2010. The laws set forth requirements for commercial breeders in Indiana, defined as  a person who maintains more than twenty (20) unaltered female dogs that are at least twelve (12) months of age. These laws do not apply to humane societies, rescue groups, certain service and hunting dog breeders, foster homes, or hobby breeders. A person may not operate a commercial dog breeder or broker operation without first registering with the state. Failure to register is a Class A misdemeanor. The chapter sets forth minimum standards of care and requires that a breeder comply with federal standards of care set forth in 9 CFR 3.1 through 9 CFR 3.12. Enforcement of the chapter will fall to the Indiana state board of animal health, which may seek injunctive relief and impose civil penalties ranging from $500 - $5,000 for violations.  
IN - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes   IN ST 35-46-3-.05 to 15; IN ST 36-8-3-18   These Indiana statutes set forth the anti-cruelty laws.  As used in this chapter, "animal" does not include a human being.  A person having a vertebrate animal in the person's custody who recklessly, knowingly, or intentionally abandons or neglects the animal commits cruelty to an animal, a Class B misdemeanor.  A person who knowingly or intentionally purchases or possesses an animal for the purpose of using the animal in an animal fighting contest commits a Class A misdemeanor.  
IN - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   IN ST 15-17-6-1 - 14; 25-38.1-4-8 ; 15-20-2-1 - 7; 6-9-39-1 - 9; 35-46-3-15; 15-20-3-1 - 4 ; 14-22-11-1   These Indiana statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Included are provisions on rabies, liability of owners for dog bites or damage to livestock, and taxation and registration laws, among others.  
IN - Dog Ordinances - Chapter 1. Liability for Dog Bites   IN ST 15-20-1-1 (formerly cited as IN ST 15-5-12-6 )  

This Indiana statute provides that the chapter related to dog bite law does not limit the power of an agency of the state or a political subdivision to adopt a rule or an ordinance that does not conflict with this chapter.

 
IN - Health - Chapter 18. Crimes and Infractions (animal health)   IN ST 15-17-18-1 to 13   These Indiana statutes set out the crimes and infractions related to animal health. Under the chapter, a person (excluding AWA licensed research facilities) may not import to or export from Indiana for the purpose of sale any dog under the age of 8 weeks unless the dog is transported with its dam. Other laws prohibit the sale of dyed birds or rabbits, the intentional running at large of livestock or poultry, and the transportation of diseased animals in contravention of this chapter.  
IN - Licenses - (Repealed by P.L.162-2006, SEC.49.) Unlicensed dog as public nuisance; impounding; reclaiming; disposal of dogs not reclaimed   IN ST 15-5-9-14 - (Repealed by P.L.162-2006, SEC.49.)   This Indiana statute provides that on and after the fifteenth day of June of each year every dog on which the tax has not been paid, is declared to be a public nuisance and shall be impounded by any law enforcement official.  The dogs are then held for up to 20 days whereupon the owner may recover the dog by paying the fee and a reasonable daily fine.  Any unclaimed dog may be sold or destroyed.  
IN - Property - (Repealed by P.L.162-2006, SEC.49.) - Dogs as Personal Property for Taxation   IN ST 15-5-10-1 - (Repealed by P.L.162-2006, SEC.49.)   Dogs are considered personal property in Indiana (repealed).  
KS - Abandon - Chapter 47. Livestock and Domestic Animals.   KS ST § 47-835   This Kansas statute provides that any animal placed in the custody of a licensed veterinarian that is unclaimed by its owner for a period of more than ten (10) days after written notice by registered or certified mail is given, shall be deemed to be abandoned and may be turned over to the nearest humane society, or dog pound or disposed of as the custodian may deem proper.  The giving of notice to the owner of record immunizes the veterinarian from liability.  
KS - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   KS ST § 47-645 - 646a; 47-835; 47-1701 - 1737; 79-1301   These Kansas statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing of dogs, specific laws that outline the care of dogs in kennel situations, and laws pertaining to dogs who endanger livestock.  
KS - Pet Sales - Chapter 47. Livestock and Domestic Animals.   KS ST 47-1701 - 1737   The following statutes comprise Kansas' Pet Animal Act. The Act outlines the requirements for pet shop operator licensing and animal dealers.  
KS - Pet Trusts - Chapter 58A. Kansas Uniform Trust Code.   KS ST § 58a-408   This Kansas statute provides that a trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime (note that it does not state "domestic" or "pet" animal).  The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.  Property of a trust authorized by this section may be applied only to its intended use, except to the extent the court determines that the value of the trust property exceeds the amount required for the intended use.  
KY - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   KY ST § 525.010 - 220; 258.500, 258.991; 189.575  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
KY - Dangerous - REPEALED - Quarantine of dogs in case of excessive damage to livestock, poultry, or domestic game birds; destruction of dogs in violation of quarantine   KY ST § 258.345   This Kentucky statute provides that, when the inhabitants of any city, or county, have suffered an excessive amount of damage to livestock or poultry or domestic game birds by dogs, a petition may be presented to the commissioner, signed by twenty (20) or more of such inhabitants who are owners of livestock or poultry, alleging such excessive damage and requesting that a quarantine be placed on all dogs within the limits of such city, or county.  It then becomes unlawful for a dog not engaged in hunting to run at large in the quarantine area.  
KY - Disaster - Chapter 39A. Statewide Emergency Management Programs   KY ST § 39A.350 - 366   Good Samaritan Act applies to registered volunteer health practitioners that provide health services for a host entity during an emergency. “Health services” include treatment, care, advice, guidance, and provision of supplies related to the health or death of an animal or to animal populations.  
KY - Dog Laws (also includes cats & ferrets) - Kentucky Consolidated Dog Laws (License, Impound, Bite, etc.)   KY ST § 258.005 - 991; 150.390  

These Kentucky statutes comprise the state's Dog Laws, which were amended significantly in 2005.  Included are all vaccination, licensing, animal control provisions, and the relevant dog bite statutes.  Under Section 258.235, any person may kill or seize any dog which he sees in the act of pursuing or wounding any livestock, or wounding or killing poultry, or attacking human beings, whether or not such dog bears the license tag required by the provisions of this chapter. There shall be no liability on such person in damages or otherwise for killing, injuring from an attempt to kill, or for seizing the dog.  That same section also comprises the state's new strict liability law for dog bites.  Under Sec. 235(4), any owner whose dog is found to have caused damage to a person, livestock, or other property shall be responsible for that damage.

 
KY - Impound - Chapter 258. Animal Control and Protection.   KY ST § 258.215   This Kentucky statute provides that peace officers, dog wardens, or animal control officers shall seize and impound any dog which does not bear a proper license tag or other legible identification which is found running at large.  Interestingly, if an officer after diligent effort to do so, should fail to seize the dog, it is his or her duty to destroy the dog by any reasonable and humane means.  The statute specifically exempts actively engaged hunting dogs from the "loose dog" prohibition.  
KY - Impound - Chapter 258. Animal Control and Protection.   KY ST § 258.265   This Kentucky statute provides that an owner shall exercise proper care and control of his dog to prevent the dog from violating any local government nuisance ordinance. Any peace officer or animal control officer may seize or destroy any dog found running at large between the hours of sunset and sunrise and unaccompanied and not under the control of its owner or handler. A peace officer or animal control officer shall be under a duty to make a fair and reasonable effort to determine whether any dog found at large between sunset and sunrise is a hound or other hunting dog which has become lost temporarily.  
KY - Impound - Confinement and destruction of dog found to have caused loss or damage to livestock, persons, or poultry; harborer of unlicensed dog forfeits rights in livestock fund   KY ST § 258.325 (REPEALED 2004)   This Kentucky statute provides that the owner of any dog or dogs having caused loss or damage to any livestock or poultry or person is definitely and conclusively shown or if written complaint is filed and if such charge is proven by investigation on the part of the department, the commissioner may notify the owner or keeper of such dog to immediately destroy the dog.  It then becomes unlawful and a violation of this chapter for such owner, or keeper to permit or cause such dog, while alive, to leave or to be removed from such premises.  The destroying of such dogs shall not remove the liability of the owner for such damage done by his dog.  
KY - Ordinances - Chapter 258. Animal Control and Protection.   KY ST § 258.195   This Kentucky statute set up in 1954 the position of county dog warden.  Additionally in 1955, each county was to establish and maintain a dog pound as a means of facilitating and administration of this chapter.  It also provides that cities, urban-county governments, or charter county governments may enter into agreements with the counties for the enforcement of the county's ordinances.  
KY - Ordinances - CHAPTER 258. DOGS.   KY ST § 258.365   This Kentucky statute provides that nothing in this chapter related to state regulation of dogs shall be construed to prohibit or limit the right of any city to pass or enforce any ordinance with respect to the regulation of dogs, the provisions of which are not inconsistent with the provisions of this chapter.  
KY - Property - Chapter 258. Animal Control and Protection.   KY ST § 258.245   This Kentucky statute provides that all licensed dogs are personal property and can thus be subject to larceny.  It further states that it is unlawful (except as otherwise provided by law) for anyone, including a peace officer, to kill or attempt to kill a licensed dog.  
LA - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   LA R.S. 46:1951 - 1959; LA R.S. 21:52; LA R.S. 32:217   The following comprise Louisiana's assistance animal/guide dog laws.  
LA - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes   LSA-R.S. 14:102 - .26   These Louisiana statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty provisions.  The term "cruel" is defined in the first section every act or failure to act whereby unjustifiable physical pain or suffering is caused or permitted.  The crime of cruelty to animals is subdivided into simple cruelty or aggravated cruelty. Simple cruelty occurs when a person intentionally or with criminal negligence overdrives, overloads, drives when overloaded, or overworks, torments, cruelly beats, or unjustifiably injures, or, having charge, custody, or possession of any animal, either as owner or otherwise, unjustifiably fails to provide any living animal with proper food, proper drink, proper shelter, or proper veterinary care.  
LA - Dangerous - Louisiana Dangerous Dog & Dog Bite Laws   LA R.S. 14:102.14; L.A. R.S. § 2771 - 2778   These Louisiana statutory sections provide the state's animal control and dangerous dog laws.  A dog becomes dangerous when (1) unprovoked, on two separate occasions within the prior thirty-six-month period, engages in any behavior that requires a defensive action by any person to prevent bodily injury when the person and the dog are off the property of the owner of the dog; (2) any dog which, when unprovoked, bites a person causing an injury; or (3) any dog which, when unprovoked, on two separate occasions within the prior thirty-six-month period, has killed, seriously bitten, inflicted injury, or otherwise caused injury to a domestic animal off the property of the owner of the dog.  It is unlawful for any person to own a dangerous dog without properly restraining or confining the dog.  Any citizen or officer may kill any dangerous or vicious dog, and no citizen or officer shall be liable for damages or to prosecution by reason of killing any dangerous or vicious dog.  The section also provides laws on licensing, vaccination, and prohibitions on dogs running at large.  
LA - Disaster - Chapter 6. The Louisiana Homeland Security and Emergency Assistance and Disaster Act.   La. Rev. Stat. Ann. §§ 29:726, 29:729 (1993)   In Louisiana, the Governor's Office of Homeland Security and Emergency Preparedness must assist in the formulation of emergency operation plans for the humane evacuation, transport, and temporary sheltering of service animals and household pets.  
LA - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   LA R.S. 2451 - 2778; LA R.S. 56:124.1; LSA-R.S. 56:141   These statutes comprise Louisiana's dog laws.  Included among the provisions are dangerous dog laws, impoundment provisions, and the relevant licensing requirements.  
LA - Dog Bite - Art. 2321. Damage caused by animals.   LA C.C. Art. 2321   This Louisiana civil code statute provides that an owner of any animal is liable for damages caused by that animal only upon a showing that he or she knew or should have known that his or her animal's behavior would cause damage, that the damage could have been prevented by the exercise of reasonable care, and that he or she failed to exercise such reasonable care.  However, the owner of a dog is strictly liable for injuries to persons or property caused by the dog and which the owner could have prevented and which did not result from the injured person's provocation of the dog.  
LA - Dog Dangerous - Chapter 1. Criminal Code.   LA R.S. 14:102.14   This Louisiana statute defines a "dangerous dog" as any dog which when unprovoked, on two separate occasions within the prior thirty-six-month period, engages in any behavior that requires a defensive action by any person to prevent bodily injury when the person and the dog are off the property of the owner of the dog; or any dog which, when unprovoked, bites a person causing an injury; or any dog which, when unprovoked, on two separate occasions within the prior thirty-six-month period, has killed, seriously bitten, inflicted injury, or otherwise caused injury to a domestic animal off the property of the owner of the dog.  It is unlawful for any person to own a dangerous dog without properly restraining or confining the dog.  
LA - Dog Fighting - House Bill 2064 (Louisiana Prohibition on Illegal Dog Training (failed))   Louisiana House Bill 2064 (2001)  

This Louisiana 2001 proposed law would have provided for the crime of illegally training dogs; however, it died in committee.  It would have also defined "illegally train" to mean the training of a dog to attack or kill a human being, another dog, or any other animal species.  The proposed law would have created exceptions for any dog used by law enforcement officials, a guard dog used to defend livestock raised for commercial or subsistence purposes, or a guard dog used to defend any school, place of business, or personal residence.   Violation of the proposed law would have incurred a fine of not more than $500 or imprisonment of not more than six months, or both.

 
LA - Dog Fighting - Senate Bill 866 (Louisiana Dogfighting Amendments (passed))   Louisiana Senate Bill 866 (2001)   This Louisiana senate bill passed in the summer of 2001 defines the act of dogfighting and makes admissible as evidence of dogfighting certain paraphernalia used in the training of dogs to fight and injuries or alterations to the dog that are consistent with dogfighting.  It exempts certain activities, including the training of dogs to protect livestock and the cropping of dogs' ears for cosmetic purposes.  Upon first conviction, violation incurs a fine of  not more than one thousand dollars or imprisonment with or without hard labor for not more than one year, or both. Upon a second or subsequent conviction, the offender shall be fined not more than three thousand dollars or be imprisoned with or without hard labor for not more than three years, or both.  
LA - Leash - Chapter 18. Animals Running at Large   LA R.S. 3:2771  

This Louisiana law states that no person shall permit any dog in his or her possession to run at large on any unenclosed land, or trespass upon any enclosed or unenclosed lands of another.

 
LA - Leash - Chapter 23. Louisiana White Cane Law.   LA R.S. 46:1956   This Louisiana leash law provides that “any person who purposely or negligently injures an assistance dog or any owner of a dog who allows that dog to injure an assistance dog because he fails to control or leash the dog shall also be guilty of a misdemeanor and fined not less than one hundred dollars nor more than five hundred dollars or imprisoned for not more than six months, or both.”  That person shall also be liable for any injuries to the assistance dog and, if necessary, the replacement and compensation for the loss of the assistance dog and attorney fees.  
LA - Ordinances - CHAPTER 18. ANIMALS RUNNING AT LARGE.   LA R.S. 3:2731  

This Louisiana statute provides that the governing bodies of all parishes and municipalities may impose license taxes on all dogs, enact ordinances for the regulation of dogs running at large, and maintain pounds for the impounding of dogs.

 
MA - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   MA ST 90 § 14A; MA ST 272 § 98A; MA ST 272 § 85B; MA ST 129 § 1; MA ST 129 § 39C, D, F, § 43  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
MA - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   MA ST 140 § 136A - § 175; MA ST 131 § 20, 21, 21A, 82   These Massachusetts statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing laws, dangerous dog laws, and rabies vaccination provisions.  
MA - Dog Ordinances - CHAPTER 140. LICENSES.   MA ST 140 § 173A   This Massachusetts statute provides the state law relative to violation of municipal by-laws or ordinances related to dog control.  Included are penalty provisions and appearance requirements.  
MA - Dog Ordinances - CHAPTER 140. LICENSES.   MA ST 140 § 173  

This Massachusetts statute provides that a town may make additional ordinances or by-laws relative to the licensing and restraining of dogs.

 
MA - Exotic Pets - Chapter 131. Inland Fisheries and Game and Other Natural Resources.   MA ST 131 § 77A   Massachusetts bans hybrid animals, those offspring of mating between a domestic animal and its wild counterpart, usually wolves and dogs. No individual may possess or own a hybrid as a pet. (See also Link to § 23. Propagation, dealing, etc., in fish, birds, mammals, reptiles or amphibians; rules and regulations; licenses; fees ).
 
MA - Leash - § 174B. Restraint of dogs in public highway rest areas; penalty   MA ST 140 § 174B   This Massachusetts law states that whoever is the owner or keeper of a dog shall restrain said dog by a chain or leash when in an officially designated public highway rest area. Whoever violates the provisions of this section shall be punished by a fine of not more than $100.  
MA - Lost Property - Chapter 134. Lost Goods and Stray Beasts   MA ST 134 § 1 - 7   This section comprises Massachusetts' Lost Goods and Stray Beasts Act.  
MA - Ordinances - By-laws and ordinances relative to regulation of dogs   MA ST 140 § 147A   This Massachusetts statute provides that any city or town that accepts the provisions of this statutory section is empowered to enact by-laws and ordinances relative to the regulation of dogs.  These areas may relate to, but not be limited to dog licensing, establishing dog fees, disposition of fees, appointment of dog officers, kennel licensing and regulations, procedures for the investigation of and reimbursement for damage caused by dogs, restraining of dogs and establishing penalties for a breach.  
MD - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   MD Code, Art. 24, § 11-502; MD HUMAN SERV § 7-701 - 709; MD TRANS § 21-511   The following statutes comprise Maryland's relevant assistance animal/guide dog laws.  
MD - Bite - Maryland Dangerous Dog Laws   MD CRIM LAW § 10-619   This Maryland statute outlines what is a "Dangerous dog."  As defined by statute, it is a dog that, without provocation, has killed or inflicted severe injury on a person, or it is a potentially dangerous dog that bites a person, when not on its owner's real property, kills or inflicts severe injury on a domestic animal, or attacks without provocation.  An owner of a dangerous dog must keep the dog securely enclosed on his or her property or must muzzle and restrain the dog.  A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction is subject to a fine not exceeding $2,500.  
MD - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes   MD CRIM LAW § 10-601 - 623; MD CRIM LAW § 3-322   This Maryland statutory section comprises the state's anti-cruelty provisions.  Under the section, "animal" means a living creature except a human being.  "Cruelty" is defined as the unnecessary or unjustifiable physical pain or suffering caused or allowed by an act, omission, or neglect, and includes torture and torment.  Agricultural, veterinary, research, and "an activity that may cause unavoidable physical pain to an animal, including food processing, pest elimination, animal training, and hunting. . . " are excluded from the purview of the act.  
MD - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   MD Code, Art. 24, § 11-501 - 514; MD Code, Transportation,§ 21-1004.1; MD Code, Art. 25, § 236A, MD Code, Natural Resources, § 10-413, 10-701 TO 703; MD Code, Natural Resources, § 10-807; MD Code, Public Safety, § 2-313; MD Code, Health - General, § 18-312 - 321; MD Code, State Government, § 13-30   These statutes comprise Maryland's dog laws.  Maryland is unique in that the state law governs the specific licensing and other regulations certain counties may adopt or enforce.  Also included are the state rabies provisions and even the law that designates the state dog (the Chesapeake Bay retriever).  
MD - Licenses - Article 24. Political Subdivisions--Miscellaneous Provisions.   MD CODE, Art. 24, § 11-510   Repealed in 2013. This Maryland statute provides that any dog found running at large without the proper license tag attached is considered a nuisance and is subject to seizure, detention and destruction.  When the dog warden is not able to catch a dog running at large without a license tag, the dog may be shot or otherwise killed.  The County Commissioners may provide by ordinance that owners of dogs may not permit the dog, whether licensed or unlicensed, to run at large, after a petition signed by a majority of residents has been submitted.  Dogs seized under this provision are kept for 72 hours; thereafter, the owner loses ownership rights and is subject to sale after an additional holding period.  Any dog seized and not redeemed within 120 hours from time of its seizure may be killed by the dog warden or one of his or her duly authorized deputies.  
MD - Ordinances - Article 24. Political Subdivisions--Miscellaneous Provisions.   MD CODE, Art. 24, § 11-511   Repealed in 2013. This Maryland statutory section only applies to Carroll County and Frederick County.  It provides that the county commissioners, by ordinance, may provide for a comprehensive system for the regulation of domestic animals, including dogs, and wild animals held in captivity, within the county, including licensing and control.  Also included are provisions for the impoundment and disposal of unlicensed or dangerous dogs and provisions for the regulation of persons who own or keep any animal which disturbs the peace.  
MD - Ordinances -§ 236A. Washington County; animal control ordinance   MD CODE, Art. 25, § 236A   Repealed in 2013. This Maryland statute provides that the County Commissioners for Washington County may adopt an animal control ordinance.  This may include provisions to hold public hearings to decide citations, complaints, and other controversies arising under the animal control ordinance.  Ordinances may also include provisions for the control of rabid animals and the disposition of uncontrolled, vicious, and sick animals among other things.  
MD - Pet Injuries, Damages - tle 11. Judgments.   MD CTS & JUD PRO § 11-110   This Maryland statute provides that the measure of damages for tortious injury or death to a pet is the market value of the pet before the injury, or the cost of veterinary care that does not exceed $7,500.  
ME - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   ME ST T. 17 § 1311 - 1316; ME ST T. 26 §§ 1420-A - 1420-C; ME ST T. 7 § 3961-A; ME ST T. 5 § 4551 - 4555  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
ME - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes   ME ST Tit. 7 § 3971 - 4041; ME ST Tit. 17 § 1011 - 1046   These Maine statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions.  The first section of laws occurs under Title 7, Agriculture and Animals.  Under these laws, a person commits animal cruelty if he or she kills the animal of another person; kills an animal by an inhumane method; injures, overworks, tortures, torments, abandons or cruelly beats or intentionally mutilates an animal; gives drugs to an animal with an intent to harm the animal; gives poison or alcohol to an animal; or exposes a poison with intent that it be taken by an animal.  The neglect component of the statute provides that a person commits cruelty if he or she deprives an animal that the person owns or possesses of necessary sustenance, necessary medical attention, proper shelter, protection from the weather or humanely clean conditions.  These acts are then cross-referenced under the criminal provisions of Title 17, which describes the penalties under § 1031.  Animal fighting is a class D crime under this section.  
ME - Disaster - Chapter 307. State of Maine Animal Response Team.   7 M.R.S.A. § 1901 - 1902   The Commissioner of Agriculture, Food and Rural Resources is directed to develop a State of Maine Animal Response Team to support a network that protects human and animal health through preparation, response and recovery for animal emergencies. The Team is to facilitate a response to a natural or man-made disaster and minimize the economic and environmental impacts of animal emergencies. The Treasurer of State is mandated to establish the State of Maine Animal Response Team Fund to pay costs incurred by the Team.  
ME - Dog, Dangerous - Maine Dangerous Dog Laws   ME ST T. 7 § 3951 - 3953; ME ST T. 7 § 3961 - 3964; ME ST T.7 § 3907  

This Maine statutory sections outlines the state's dangerous dog laws.  It first provides that any person may lawfully kill a dog if necessary to protect that person, another person or a domesticated animal during the course of a sudden, unprovoked assault.  A person who owns or keeps a dangerous dog commits a civil violation for which the court shall adjudge a fine of not less than $250 and not more than $1,000.  The dog may be ordered to be muzzled, or euthanized if it has killed, maimed or inflicted serious bodily injury upon a person or has a history of a prior assault.  Notably, if a dog whose owner refuses or neglects to comply with the order wounds any person by a sudden assault or wounds or kills any domestic animal, the owner shall pay the person injured treble damages and costs to be recovered by a civil action.  The statute sets out the specific procedure for declaring a dog dangerous and the statutory definition of dangerous is also provided by reference to a companion statute.

 
ME - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   ME ST T.7 §3901 - 4163; ME ST T. 12 § 12707   These Maine statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws that determine the disposition of loose or dangerous dogs, and a chapter on the sale of dogs.  
ME - Domestic Violence- Title 19-A. Domestic Relations.   ME ST T. 19-A § 4007   This Maine law concerning personal protection orders in cases of abuse was amended in March of 2006 to include companion animals in protection orders.  The new language specifies that a court may enter an order directing the care, custody or control of any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept or held by either party or a minor child residing in the household. In 2013, the statute was amended to allow the court to enter an order directing the defendant to refrain from injuring or threatening to injure any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept or held by either party or a minor child residing in the household.  
ME - Exotic Pets - Chapter 723. Facility Licenses.   ME ST T. 7 § 3931-B (§ 3931-B. Repealed. Laws 2011, c. 100, § 13, eff. May 19, 2011)   This Maine statute outlines the requirements that apply to wolf hybrid kennels. A person who operates a wolf hybrid kennel must register with the department. The offspring of a wolf hybrid must be permanently identified prior to transferring ownership or care of the animal. Failure to comply with the provisions of this section results in a civil violation with a forfeiture not to exceed $1,000. (For other exotic pet laws in Maine, see Chapter 730-A. Breeding, Sale and Transportation of Small Mammals).  
ME - Impound -Chapter 719. Uncontrolled Dogs.   ME ST T. 7 § 3912   This Maine statute provides that an animal control officer shall seize, impound, or restrain a loose dog.  If ownership is unknown, the dog may be delivered to the local animal shelter where it can be treated as a stray.  If ownership is known, the officer must either deliver it to the owner or take it to an animal shelter.  
ME - Lost Property - Chapter 21. Lost Goods and Stray Beasts.   ME ST T. 33 § 1051 - 1060   This section comprises Maine's Lost Goods and Stray Beasts Act.  
MI - Assistance animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   MCL 287.291 and MCL 750.50a, 750.502c; MCL 752.51a, 752.52, 752.61 - 63  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
MI - Dangerous - Chapter 287. Animal Industry. Dangerous Animals.   M. C. L. A. 287.321 - 323   This Michigan statute defines "dangerous animal," which means a dog or other animal that bites or attacks a person, or a dog that bites or attacks and causes serious injury or death to another dog while the other dog is on the property or under the control of its owner.  However, a dangerous animal does not include any of the following:  an animal that bites or attacks a person who is knowingly trespassing on the property of the animal's owner; an animal that bites or attacks a person who provokes or torments the animal; or an animal that is responding in a manner that an ordinary and reasonable person would conclude was designed to protect a person if that person is engaged in a lawful activity or is the subject of an assault.  
MI - Dog Bite - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code.   MCL 750.66a   This Michigan law, which becomes effective January of 2009, provides that a person 18 years of age or older who is responsible for controlling the actions of a dog or wolf-dog cross and the person knows or has reason to know that the dog or wolf-dog cross has bitten another person shall remain on the scene. A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 93 days or a fine of not more than $500.00, or both.  
MI - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   M.C.L. 287.261 - 395; 324.73101 - 42106  

The regulation of dogs and cats in Michigan implicates three major issues: licensing and registration of dogs; the regulation of animal control facilities and pet shops; and the ever-present concern of dog bites.  The primary statutory vehicle that regulates the licensing requirements for dogs is the The Dog Law of 1919. Under the dog law, it is unlawful for any person to own a dog six months or older unless the dog is licensed. MCL § 287.262. It is also unlawful for a person to own a dog six months or older that does not wear a collar and tag at all times, except when engaged in hunting activities accompanied by his or her owner. MCL § 287.262. A female dog that is in heat may not go beyond her owner’s premises unless properly held on a leash under this section.

 
MI - Exotic pets - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. WOLF-DOG CROSS ACT.   MI ST 287.1021  

Under this Michigan statute, a local unit is empowered to adopt an ordinance governing wolf-dog crosses that is more restrictive than this act, provided it fulfills the requirements of this act in addition to any other requirements governing a wolf-dog cross under state and federal law.

 
MI - Exotic pets - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. WOLF-DOG CROSS ACT.   M. C. L. A. 287.1004   This Michigan statute provides the requirements for ownership of wolf-dog hybrids in the state.  
MI - Exotic Pets - Chapter 287. Animal Industry; Wolf-dog Cross Act   MI ST 287.1001 - 1023   This Michigan law bans acquisition and possession of wolf-dog hybrids, though it “grandfathered” animals already owned as pets at the time of the law's enactments. In order to maintain public safety and animal welfare, the state created a strict permit system for those owners who were allowed to keep their already-existing pets. (See also link to Chapter 287. Animal Industry; Large Carnivore Act; link to 287.731- Importation of species having potential to endanger life or property prohibited; importation of wild or exotic animals; requirements and prohibitions).  
MI - Impound - Chapter 287. Animal Industry. Use of Dogs and Cats for Research.   MCL 287.388   This Michigan statute provides that a dealer, a county, city, village, or township operating a dog pound or animal shelter shall not sell or otherwise dispose of a dog or cat within 4 days after its acquisition. If the dog or cat has a collar, license, or other evidence of ownership, the operator of the pound or shelter shall notify the owner in writing and disposition of the animal shall not be made within 7 days from the date of mailing the notice.  
MI - Leash - 287.262. Licensing and control of dogs; hunting dogs; female dogs in heat; straying dogs   M. C. L. A. 287.262   This section of the Dog Law of 1919 provides that any dog over six months must be registered and wear a collar at all times.  It also mandates that female dogs in heat must be kept on their owners' premises or restrained on a leash.  The overall leash requirement is less clear, stating that it is unlawful for an owner to allow a dog "to stray unless held properly in leash."  This does appear to mandate a statewide leash requirement for dogs, however.  
MI - Lost Property - Chapter 434. Lost and Unclaimed Property. Lost Property.   M. C. L. A. 434.21 - 29   This section comprises Michigan's Lost Property statutes.  
MI - Ordinances - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. DOG LAW OF 1919.   M. C. L. A. 287.290   This Michigan statute enables a city, village or township to adopt an animal control ordinance to regulate the licensing, payment of claims and providing for the enforcement thereof.  
MI - Ordinances - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. DOG LAW OF 1919.   M. C. L. A. 287.289a   This Michigan law provides that a board of county commissioners may establish, by ordinance, an animal control agency.  The animal control agency shall have jurisdiction to enforce this act in any city, village or township which does not have an animal control ordinance. The county's animal control ordinance shall provide for animal control programs, facilities, personnel and necessary expenses incurred in animal control.   
MI - Ordinances - Chapters 81 to 113 Fourth Class Cities.   M. C. L. A. 91.1  

This Michigan statute provides that a city incorporated under the provisions of this act has, and the council may pass ordinances relating to, the following general powers:  To provide for the issuing of licenses to the owners and keepers of dogs and to require the owners and keepers of dogs to pay for and obtain such licenses; and to regulate and prevent the running at large of dogs, to require dogs to be muzzled, and to authorize the killing of dogs running at large or not licensed in violation of an ordinance of the city.

 
MI - Pet Trusts - Chapter 700. Estates and Protected Individuals Code. Estates and Protected Individuals Code.   M. C. L. A. 700.2722   This Michigan statute provides that a trust for the care of a designated domestic or pet animal is valid (these trusts follow the terms for non-charitable trusts and thus, can be of a duration of up to 21 years). The trust terminates when no living animal is covered by the trust.  Extrinsic evidence is admissible to prove the transferor's intent and the court may reduce the amount of the property transferred if it determines that that amount substantially exceeds the amount required for the intended use.  
MI - Service Animal - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code.   M.C.L.A. 750.50c   This statute outlines the penalty for the intentional physical harm or interference with a police dog or horse.  The statute provides for a misdemeanor in the case of interference to the animal and a five-year felony where the animal was killed or seriously physically injured.  If the interference was committed during the commission of another felony, then the penalty rises to a potential two-year imprisonment.  
MI - Service Animal - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code.   M.C.L.A. 750.50a   This statute sets out the penalty for willful and malicious interference with guide dogs used by individuals defined by statute as blind, deaf, or physically limited.  Under the statute, a first offense results in a misdemeanor conviction with penalty enhancement for subsequent convictions.  
MN - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animals/Guide Dog Laws   MN ST § 169.202; 343.20; 343.21; 363A.09; 363A.19; 256C.001 - 256C.06 ; 609.226  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
MN - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes   MN ST 343.01 - 40; MN ST 609.294   These Minnesota statute comprise the anti-cruelty laws in the state.  This section first allows the formation of private prevention of cruelty to animals societies and humane societies and sets forth their obligations by law.  "Animal" is defined by this section as every living creature except members of the human race.  No person shall overdrive, overload, torture, cruelly beat, neglect, or unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill any animal, or cruelly work any animal when it is unfit for labor.  Under the neglect component, the statute states that no person shall deprive any animal over which the person has charge or control of necessary food, water, or shelter, among other things.  
MN - Dangerous - Minnesota Dangerous Dog Definitions, Dog Bites, & Rabies Treatments   MN ST § 35.67 - 35.69; MN ST § 346.51; MN ST § 347.50   This Minnesota statute outlines the procedure for a town establishing a rabies proclamation and prevents the running at large of unmuzzled dogs in such localities.  It also provides that an owner or custodian of a dog which does not have an appropriate antirabies vaccination and which bites or otherwise exposes a person to rabies virus may be penalized under section 346.53.  The statute also defines "dangerous dog" and "potentially dangerous dog."   
MN - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   MN ST 35.67 - 71; 97A.321, 97B.001 - 621; 325F.79-792; 346.01-58; 347.01-56; 365.10; 366.01   These statutes comprise Minnesota's relevant dog laws.  Among the provisions include several laws related to natural resources protection and hunting with dogs, the sale of dogs, and laws related to damage done by dogs.  
MN - Dogs - 347.14. Unlicensed dogs   MN ST § 347.14   This Minnesota statute, amended in 2006, provides that any person may seize, impound, or restrain any unlicensed dog which the person may find running at large. The fact that a dog is without a license attached to a collar shall be presumptive evidence that the dog is unlicensed.  An officer is under a duty to seize and impound such animal.  
MN - Ordinances - 366.01.Chapter 366. Town Board; Board of Audit. Town Board.   MN ST § 366.01   This Minnesota statute provides that the supervisors of each town constituting a town board are empowered to license and regulate the presence or keeping of dogs or domestic animal pets when deemed to be in the public interest.  
MN - Ordinances - Chapter 347. Dogs and Cats. Dogs.   MN ST § 347.21   This Minnesota statute provides that state dog control laws are supplemental to local provisions enacted by ordinance and shall not be construed as to modify, repeal, or prevent municipalities from prohibiting, licensing, or regulating the running at large of dogs.  
MN - Ordinances - Chapter 365. Town General Law. Town Meeting Powers.   MN ST § 365.10   Under this Minnesota statute, town electors at their annual town meeting, are empowered to exercise control over a number of activities relating to dogs.  They can decide the locations of pounds, set the number of poundmasters, and discontinue a pound.  The electors may make orders and bylaws on restraining horses, cattle, sheep, swine, and other domestic animals from going at large on roads. They may also make orders and bylaws on the impounding of domestic animals going at large and fix penalties for violations of the orders and bylaws.  The electors may let the town board pass an ordinance for licensing dogs and cats and regulating their presence, keeping, and running at large in the town.  The electors are also granted the authority to provide for a specific activity that is within any of the following categories:  the promotion of health, safety, order, and convenience, and the general welfare.   
MO - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   MO ST 209.150, 209.152, 209.160, 209.162, 209.190, 209.200, 209.202, 209.204; 304.080  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
MO - Dog Ordinances - Chapter 77. Third Class Cities.   MO ST 77.510   This Missouri statute provides that a city council may tax, restrain and prohibit the running at large of dogs, and provide for their destruction when at large contrary to ordinance, and impose penalties on the owners or keepers thereof.  
MO - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   MO ST 273.010 - 405   These Missouri statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include laws for impounding loose dogs, licensing, rabies control, and the Animal Care Facilities Act, which regulates commercial breeders/pet shops.  
MO - Impound - Chapter 273. Dogs--Cats. Local Option Dog Tax.   MO ST 273.100   This Missouri statute provides that every city or town marshal of every incorporated city or town shall seize and impound all dogs found running at large without collars around their necks.  These dogs will be kept for a period of one week after which they shall be put to death by humane methods.  The statute further states that any marshal who shall fail or refuse to take up and impound any such dog shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction thereof fined not less than five dollars nor more than twenty-five dollars.  
MO - Lost Dog - Uniform Disposition of Unclaimed Property Act   MO ST 447.010 - 721   This section comprises Missouri's Uniform Disposition of Unclaimed Property Act.  
MO - Ordinances - Chapter 79. Fourth Class Cities. Police and Health Regulations   MO ST 79.400  

This Missouri statute provides that a local board of aldermen may tax, regulate and restrain and prohibit the running at large of dogs, and provide for their destruction when at large contrary to ordinance, and impose penalties on the owners or keepers thereof.

 
MO - Pet Shop - Animal Care and Facilities Licensing and Regulation (Chapter 273)   MO ST 273.325 - 359   Under these Missouri statutes, a license is required to operate animal boarding facilities, pet shops, pounds, dealers and commercial breeders. The canine cruelty prevention act makes it the crime of canine cruelty if the person poses a substantial risk to the health and welfare of animals in the person's custody. A violation is a misdemeanor.  
MO - Wildlife - Chapter 252. Department of Conservation--Fish and Game.   MO ST 252.040   No wildlife shall be pursued, taken, killed, possessed or disposed of except in the manner, to the extent and at the time or times permitted by such rules and regulations; and any pursuit, taking, killing, possession or disposition thereof, except as permitted by such rules and regulations, are hereby prohibited. Any person violating this section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor except that any person violating any of the rules and regulations pertaining to record keeping requirements imposed on licensed fur buyers and fur dealers shall be guilty of an infraction and shall be fined not less than ten dollars nor more than one hundred dollars.  At least one case has held this statute to be applicable to dogs chasing deer.  
MS - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   MS ST § 43-6-151 to 43-6-155; § 97-41-21; § 63-3-1111  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
MS - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   MS ST § 19-5-50; § 19-25-83; § 19-5-3; § 21-19-9; § 21-21-5; § 41-53-1 - 13; § 49-7-42; § 69-29-2; § 73-39-89; § 95-5-19 - 21   These Mississippi statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Included are provisions relating to hunting with dogs, local dog ordinances, and liability of owners for damage done by dogs.  
MS - Dog Licenses - Chapter 53. Dogs and Rabies Control.   MS ST 41-53-11   This Mississippi statute provides that it is the lawful duty for any sheriff, conservation officer or peace officer of a county or municipality to kill any dog above the age of three (3) months found running at large on whose neck there is no such collar and tag or who are not inoculated according to state law. No action shall be maintained by the owner for such killing.  However, the statute then goes on to say that it is the duty of such officer to first impound the dogs for five days and give a description of the dog to the sheriff.  
MS - Leash, Impound - Chapter 19. Health, Safety, and Welfare   MS ST § 21-19-9   This Mississippi law grants broad powers to local units of government for animal control, including the power to prevent or regulate the running at large of animals of all kinds, and to cause such as may be running at large to be impounded and sold to discharge the costs and penalties provided for the violation of such regulations and the expense of impounding and keeping and selling the same; to regulate and provide for the taxing of owners and harborers of dogs, and to destroy dogs running at large, unless such dogs have proper identification.  
MS - Licenses - Chapter 5. Health, Safety and Public Welfare. In General   MS ST § 19-5-50   This Mississippi statute provides that the governing authorities of any county bordering on the Gulf of Mexico and having within its boundaries two cities having in excess of forty thousand (40,000) population each and any county with a population in excess of two hundred thousand (200,000) shall have the power to prevent or regulate the running at large of animals of all kinds, and to cause such as may be running at large to be impounded and sold to discharge the costs.  These governing bodies are also given the authority to regulate and tax dogs generally.  
MT - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   MT ST 49-4-202 to 49-4-217; 61-8-516  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
MT - Bite - Chapter 1. Availability of Remedies--Liability.   MT ST 27-1-715   This Montana statute provides that the owner of any dog which shall without provocation bite any person while such person is on or in a public place or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of such dog, located within an incorporated city or town shall be liable for such damages as may be suffered by the person bitten regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.  
MT - Dangerous - CHAPTER 23. DOMESTIC ANIMAL CONTROL AND PROTECTION.   MT ST 7-23-2109   This Montana statute provides that the county governing body may regulate, restrain, control, kill, or quarantine any vicious dog, whether such dog is licensed or unlicensed, by the adoption of an ordinance which substantially complies with state dangerous dog laws.  
MT - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   MT ST 7-23-101 to 7-23-105; 7-23-2108 to 7-23-4104; 7-23-4201 to 7-23-4203; 27-1-715; 81-7-401 to 81-7-403   These Montana statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include strict liability for all dog bites, authority for counties to enact ordinances regarding dangerous dogs, barking dogs, and destruction of unlicensed dogs, as well as general laws related to registration and licensing.  
MT - Licenses - Chapter 23. Domestic Animal Control and Protection.   MT ST 7-23-4103   This Montana statute relates to annual dog licenses issued by municipal corporations pursuant to an ordinance which substantially complies with state law.  
MT - Lost Property - RIGHTS AND DUTIES OF FINDERS GENERALLY   MT ST 70-5-101 to 70-5-107   This section comprises Montana's lost property provisions.  
MT - Ordinance - Chapter 23. Domestic Animal Control and Protection.   MT ST 7-23-2108   This Montana statute provides that the governing body of the county may regulate, restrain, or prohibit the running at large of dogs by the adoption of an ordinance which substantially complies with state law provisions related to licensing.  Violation of an ordinance adopted is a misdemeanor.  Additionally, the county governing body is authorized to impound, sell, kill, or otherwise destroy dogs found at large contrary to ordinances.  
MT - Trusts - Chapter 2. Upc--Intestacy, Wills, and Donative Transfers.   MT ST 72-2-1017   This Montana statute states that a trust for the care of a designated domestic or pet animal is valid (but for no longer than 21 years, even if the trust provides for a longer term).  The trust terminates when no living animal is covered by the trust.  Extrinsic evidence is admissible in determining the transferor's intent.  Except as expressly provided otherwise in the trust instrument, no portion of the principal or income may be converted to the use of the trustee or to any use other than for the trust's purposes or for the benefit of a covered animal and a court may reduce the amount of the property transferred if it determines that that amount substantially exceeds the amount required for the intended use.  
NC - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   NC ST § 14-163.1; § 168-1 - 13; § 20-175.1 - 175.4  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
NC - Bite - Chapter 67. Dogs. Article 1A. Dangerous Dogs.   NC ST § 67-1 to 18; NC ST § 130A-196, 130A-200   These North Carolina statutes comprise the state's dangerous dog and dog bite laws.  Among the provisions include misdemeanor penalties for an owner if a dangerous dog attacks a person and causes physical injuries requiring medical treatment in excess of one hundred dollars ($100.00) and strict liability in civil damages for any injuries or property damage the dog inflicts upon a person, his property, or another animal.  Another statute provides that any person brought to receive medical treatment for a dog bite must report it to the local health director and the animal must be confined for a ten day observation period.  
NC - Dangerous Dogs - Chapter 67. Dogs   NC ST § 67-14.1   This North Carolina statute provides that any dog which trails, runs, injures or kills any deer or bear on any wildlife refuge, sanctuary or management area designated by the Wildlife Resources Commission, during the closed season for hunting with dogs on such refuge or management area, is hereby declared to be a public nuisance, and any wildlife protector may destroy it by humane method.  Any unmuzzled dog running at large in such area shall be impounded and notice shall be published in some newspaper published in the county for two successive weeks.  If no owner comes to claim the dog, it may be destroyed within 15 days after publication.  
NC - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   NC ST § 14-81 to 82; § 19A-20 to 44; § 19A-60 to 65; § 67-1 - 36; § 90-187.7; § 113-291.5; § 130A-184 to 204; § 145-13; § 160A-186; § 160A-212   These North Carolina statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include pet shop provisions, rabies vaccination laws, and the dangerous dog chapter.  
NC - Impound - Chapter 90. Medicine and Allied Occupations.   NC ST § 90-187.7   This North Carolina statute provides that any animal placed in the custody of a licensed veterinarian for treatment, boarding or other care, unclaimed by its owner for a period of more than 10 days after written notice by registered or certified mail, shall be deemed to be abandoned and may be turned over to the nearest humane society, or dog pound or disposed of as such custodian may deem proper.  The giving of proper notice relieves such custodian of liability resulting from the disposal.  
NC - Licenses - Chapter 130A. Public Health.   NC ST § 130A-192   This North Carolina statute provides that the Animal Control Officer shall canvass the county to determine if there are any dogs or cats not wearing the required rabies vaccination tag.  If the animal is wearing an owner identification tag, or if the Animal Control Officer otherwise knows who the owner is, the Animal Control Officer shall notify the owner in writing to have the animal vaccinated against rabies and to produce the required rabies vaccination certificate within three days.  If the animal is not wearing an owner identification tag and the Animal Control Officer does not otherwise know who the owner is, the Animal Control Officer may impound the animal.  The duration of the impoundment of these animals shall be established by the county board of commissioners, but the duration shall not be less than 72 hours.  During the impoundment period, the Animal Control Officer shall make a reasonable effort to locate the owner of the animal.  
NC - Licenses - Chapter 160A. Cities and Towns.   NC ST § 160A-212   This North Carolina statute provides that a city shall have power to levy an annual license tax on the privilege of keeping any domestic animal, including dogs and cats, within the city.  However, this section shall not limit the city's authority to enact related ordinances.  
NC - Ordinances - Chapter 160A. Cities and Towns.   NC ST § 160A-186  

This North Carolina statute provides that a city may by ordinance regulate, restrict, or prohibit the keeping, running, or going at large of any domestic animals, including dogs and cats. The ordinance may provide that animals allowed to run at large in violation of the ordinance may be seized and sold or destroyed after reasonable efforts to notify their owner.

 
NC - Ordinances - Chapter 67. Dogs.   NC ST § 67-4.5  

This North Carolina statute provides that nothing in the dangerous dog laws shall be construed to prevent a city or county from adopting or enforcing its own program for control of dangerous dogs.

 
NC - Rabies - Chapter 130A. Public Health.   NC ST § 130A-195   This North Carolina statute provides that when quarantine has been declared and dogs and cats continue to run uncontrolled in the area, any peace officer or Animal Control Officer shall have the right, after reasonable effort has been made to apprehend the animals, to destroy the uncontrolled dogs and cats and properly dispose of their bodies.  
NC - Trusts - Chapter 36C. North Carolina Uniform Trust Code.   NC ST § 36C-4-408   This North Carolina provides that a trust for the care of one or more designated domestic or pet animals alive at the time of creation of the trust is valid.  Further, no portion of the principal or income may be converted to the use of the trustee or to any use other than for the benefit of the designated animal or animals.  The trust terminates upon the death of the animal named or the last surviving animal named in the trust.  
ND - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   ND ST 25-13-01 - 06  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
ND - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   ND ST 11-11-14; 20.1-04-12 - 12.2; 20.1-05-02.1; 23-36-01 - 09; 36-21-10 - 11; 40-05-01 -2; 40-05-19; 42-03-01 - 04; 43-29-16.1   These statutes comprise North Dakota's dog laws.  Among the provisions include municipal powers to regulate dogs, rabies, control laws, provisions that define dogs as a public nuisance, and laws concerning dogs that harass big game or livestock.  
ND - Lost Property - CHAPTER 60-01. DEPOSITS - GENERAL PROVISIONS.   ND ST 60-01-34 to 43   These statutes comprise North Dakota's lost property provisions.  
ND - Ordinances - Chapter 40-05. Powers of Municipalities.   ND ST 40-05-02  

This North Dakota statute provides that the city council in a city operating under the council form of government and the board of city commissioners in a city operating under the commission system of government, in addition to the powers possessed by all municipalities, shall have power to license dogs and to regulate the keeping of dogs including authorization for their disposition or destruction in order to protect the health, safety, and general welfare of the public.

 
ND - Rabies - Chapter 23-36. Rabies Control.   ND ST 23-36-03   This North Dakota statute provides that the appropriate health department may promptly seize and humanely kill, impound at the owner's expense, or quarantine any animal if the state health officer has probable cause to believe the animal presents clinical symptoms of rabies or determines the animal is a threat to human life or safety due to the possible exposure of an individual to rabies.  
NE - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   Neb. Rev. St. § 49-801; Neb. Rev. St. § 20-126 - 131.04; Neb. Rev. St. § 28-1313 - 1314; Neb. Rev. St. § 54-603; Neb. Rev. St. § 28-1009.01  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
NE - Cruelty - Article 10. Offenses Against Animals   NE ST § 28-1001 to 1020   This Nebraska statutory section comprises the state's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions.  The cruelty provision provides that a person who abandons or cruelly neglects an animal is guilty of a Class I misdemeanor.  Intentional animal cruelty results in a Class I misdemeanor for the first offense and a Class IV felony for any subsequent offense, unless such cruel mistreatment involves the knowing and intentional torture, repeated beating, or mutilation of the animal where such an act automatically results in a Class IV felony.  Animal means any vertebrate member of the animal kingdom, but does not include an uncaptured wild creature (which appears to exclude otherwise heinous, intentional acts to wildlife).  
NE - Dangerous - ARTICLE 6. DOGS AND CATS. (B) DANGEROUS DOGS.   NE ST § 54-617 to 54-624   These Nebraska statutes outline the state's dangerous dog laws.  Among the provisions include a requirement that the dog must be restrained when not in a secure enclosure on the owner's property.  There is also a requirement that owners must post warning signs on the property notifying people that a dangerous dog is present.  If a dangerous dog bites a person, the owner can be found guilty of a Class IV misdemeanor and the dog will be destroyed.   
NE - Dangerous Dog - 54-624. CHAPTER 54. LIVESTOCK .   NE ST § 54-624  

This Nebraska statute provides that nothing in the state dangerous dog laws (sections 54-617 to 54-623) shall be construed to restrict or prohibit any governing board of any county, city, or village from establishing and enforcing laws or ordinances at least as stringent as the provisions of sections 54-617 to 54-623.

 
NE - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   NE ST § 14-102; § 15-218 - 220; § 16-206; 16-235; § 17-526, 17-547; § 25-21,236; § 37-525; § 37-705; § 54-601 - 616; § 54-617 - 624; § 54-625 - 650; § 71-4401 - 4412   These Nebraska statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include the municipal authority to regulate dogs at large and licensing, rabies control, and dangerous dog laws.  The set of laws relating to commercial pet dealers and breeders is also provided.  
NE - Impound - CHAPTER 71. PUBLIC HEALTH AND WELFARE   NE ST § 71-4408   This Nebraska statute provides that any dog found outside the owner's premises whose owner does not possess a valid certificate of rabies vaccination and valid rabies vaccination tag for such dog shall be impounded for not less than 72 hours.  If an impounded domestic animal is unclaimed at the end of five days, the authorities may dispose of it in accordance with applicable laws or rules and regulations.  
NE - Licenses - Chapter 15. Cities of the Primary Class.   NE ST § 15-220   This Nebraska statute provides that a primary city shall have power to regulate, license, or prohibit the running at large of dogs and other animals and guard against injuries or annoyances therefrom, and to authorize the destruction of the same when running at large contrary to the provisions of any ordinance.  
NE - Licenses - Chapter 15. Cities of the Primary Class   NE ST § 15-218   This Nebraska statue provides that a primary city shall have power, by ordinance, to regulate or prohibit the running at large of cattle, hogs, horses, mules, sheep, goats, dogs, and other animals and to cause these animals to be impounded and sold to discharge the cost of impoundment.  
NE - Licenses - Chapter 54. Livestock. Article 6. Dogs and Cats.   NE ST § 54-603   This Nebraska statute provides that any county, city, or village shall have authority by ordinance or resolution, to impose a license tax on the owner or harborer of any dog or dogs.  
NE - Licenses -Chapter 17. Cities of the Second Class And Villages.   NE ST § 17-526   This Nebraska statute provides that second-class cities and villages may, by ordinance, impose a license tax for each dog or other animal and cause the destruction of any dog or other animal when the owner or harborer shall refuse or neglect to pay such license.  Such municipality may regulate, license, or prohibit the running at large of dogs and other animals and guard against injuries or annoyances therefrom and authorize the destruction of the same when running at large contrary to the provisions of any ordinance.   
NH - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   N.H. Rev. Stat. § 21-P:37-a; 167-D:1 - 10; 265:41-a  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
NH - Disaster - Chapter 21-P. Department of Safety. Homeland Security and Emergency Management.   N.H. Rev. Stat. § 21-P:37-a   In New Hampshire, state policy mandates that service animals and the people they serve be kept  together in cases of emergency. State emergency planning and training must take that requirement into account.  
NH - Dog Bite - Chapter 466. Dogs and Cats.   N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:31   Under this section, a dog is considered to be a nuisance, a menace, or vicious to persons or to property if it is "at large," if it barks for sustained periods, if it chases cars continuously, or if it growls, snaps at or bites persons.  If a dog bites a person and breaks the skin, the animal control officer must inform the victim whether the dog was vaccinated against rabies within 24 hours.  
NH - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:1 - 466:54; 47:17; 207:11 - 207:13b; 210:18; 264:31; 436:99 - 436:109; 437:1 - 437:22; 437-A:1 - 9; 508:18-a   These New Hampshire statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, dangerous dog laws, and the rabies control code.  
NH - Exotic Pets - Chapter 466-A. Wolf Hybrids   N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466-A:1 to 466-A:6   This section of laws comprises New Hampshire's wolf-dog hybrid act. Under the law, no person shall sell or resell, offer for sale or resale, or release or cause to be released a wolf hybrid in the state of New Hampshire. A person may temporarily import a wolf hybrid provided that he or she shows proof of spaying or neutering and has accurate vaccination records. Each wolf hybrid shall be under the physical control of the owner or confined in an enclosure or structure sufficient to prohibit escape. Any person in violation of this chapter or any rule adopted under this chapter shall be guilty of a class A misdemeanor. (See also link to 207:14 Import, Possession, or Release of Wildlife).  
NH - Impound - Chapter 436. Diseases of Domestic Animals. Rabies Control.   N.H. Rev. Stat. § 436:107   This New Hampshire statute provides that the local rabies control authority shall establish and maintain a pound.  Any dog found off the owner's premises and not wearing a valid vaccination tag shall be impounded and maintained at the pound for a minimum of 7 days unless reclaimed earlier by the owner.  Notice of impoundment of all dogs, including any significant marks of identification, shall be posted at the pound as public notification of impoundment.  If the dog is unclaimed at the end of 7 days, the rabies control authority may dispose of the dog in accordance with applicable laws or rules.  
NH - Kennel - CHAPTER 466. DOGS AND CATS.   N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:6   This New Hampshire statute outlines the provisions of dog group licenses (i.e., kennel licenses).  
NH - Licenses - Chapter 466. Dogs and Cats.   N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:30-a   This New Hampshire law provides that it is unlawful for any dog to run at large.  "At large" is defined as "off the premises of the owner or keeper and not under the control of any person by means of personal presence and attention as will reasonably control the conduct of such dog, unless accompanied by the owner or custodian."  Any authorized person may seize such at large dogs.  
NH - Ordinances - 466:30-b Referendum (muzzling and restraining dogs)   N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:30-b   This New Hampshire statute outlines the required referendum format if a town seeks to adopt an ordinance that prohibits the running at large of dogs.  Towns that do not adopt this statutory format may regulate the running at large of dogs by enacting ordinances that comply with other statutes.  
NH - Rabies, licenses - Chapter 466. Dogs and Cats.   N.H. Rev. Stat. § 466:29   This New Hampshire statute provides that, in the case of a rabies epidemic, the mayor and aldermen of a city or the selectmen of a town may order that all dogs within the limits of the city or town shall be muzzled or restrained from running at large during the time prescribed by such order.  Any offending dog may be impounded.  
NJ - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   NJ ST 2A:42-109; 10:5-5; 10:5-29.1 - 10; 39:4-37.1; 48:3-33; App. A:9-43.2; 2C:29-3.1; 48:3-33; 18A:46-13.3  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
NJ - Disaster - Article 6. Emergency Powers of Governor   NJ ST App. A:9-43.1   In New Jersey, the State Office of Emergency Management, and each county and municipality, is directed to adopt a emergency operations plans that include provisions to support the needs of animals and individuals with an animal under their care, including a service animal, in a major disaster or emergency.  
NJ - Dog - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by.   NJ ST 4:19-15.1 to 4:19-15.33   These New Jersey statutes comprise the laws for licensing, impounding, appointment of animal control officers, and kennel/pet shop regulations.  It also includes a provision that prohibits impounded animals from being sold or donated for experimentation, as well as pet sterilization provisions..  
NJ - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   NJ ST 2A:42-101 to 2A:42-113; 2C:29-3.1; 4:19-1 to 4:19-43; 4:19A-1 - 17; 4:21B-1 - 3; 4:22A-1 to 13; 23:4-25, 26, 46; 26:4-78 - 95; 40:48-1   These statutes comprise New Jersey's dog laws.  Among the provisions include laws regarding domesticated animals in housing projects, rabies control laws, licensing requirements, and dangerous dog laws.  
NJ - Impound - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by   NJ ST 4:19-26   This New Jersey statute provides that, if a dog is declared vicious or potentially dangerous, the owner of the dog shall be liable to the municipality in which the dog is impounded for the costs and expenses of impounding and destroying the dog. The municipality may establish by ordinance a schedule of these costs and expenses.  
NJ - Impound - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by.   NJ ST 4:19-9  

This New Jersey statute provides that a person may humanely destroy a dog in self defense, or which is found chasing, worrying, wounding or destroying any sheep, lamb, poultry or domestic animal.

 
NJ - License - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by   NJ ST 4:19-31  

This New Jersey statute provides that every municipality may, by ordinance, fix the sum to be paid annually for a potentially dangerous dog license and each renewal thereof, which sum shall not be less than $150 nor more than $700. In the absence of any local ordinance, the fee for all potentially dangerous dog licenses shall be $150.

 
NJ - Licenses - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by   NJ ST 4:19-15.11   This New Jersey statute provides that dog license fees collected under this chapter shall be used by municipalities for the following purposes only; for collecting, keeping and disposing of dogs liable to seizure under this act or under local dog control ordinances; for local prevention and control of rabies; for providing antirabic treatment under the direction of the local board of health for any person known or suspected to have been exposed to rabies, for payment of damage to or losses of poultry and domestic animals, except dogs and cats, caused by a dog or dogs and for administering the provisions of this act.  
NJ - Licenses - 4Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by   NJ ST 4:19-1   This New Jersey statute provides the regulations for dog taxes except in taxing districts where the running at large of dogs is regulated by ordinance.  
NJ - Ordinance - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by.   NJ ST 4:19-15.12   This New Jersey statute provides that a municipality may by ordinance, fix the sum to be paid annually for a dog license and each renewal thereof, which sum shall be not less than $1.50 nor more than $21.00.  The statute also also provides upper and lower limits for three-year licenses.  
NJ - Ordinances - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by   NJ ST 4:19-36  

This New Jersey statute provides that the provisions of the dangerous dog act shall supersede any law, ordinance, or regulation concerning vicious or potentially dangerous dogs, any specific breed of dog, or any other type of dog inconsistent with this act enacted by any municipality, county, or county or local board of health.

 
NJ - Pet Sales - Pet Purchase Protection Act   NJ ST 56:8-92 to 56:8-97   This New Jersey Act protects pet purchasers who receive "defective" companion animals.  A purchaser of a defective pet must have his or her pet examined by a veterinarian within 14 days of purchase to receive a refund or exchange.  Alternatively, a buyer may retain the pet and be reimbursed for veterinary bills up to two times the cost of the dog or cat.  
NJ - Pet Trusts - Trusts for care of domesticated animals   NJ ST 3B:11-38   This New Jersey statute provides that a trust for the care of a domesticated animal is valid.  Trusts under this section terminate when no living animal is covered by the trust, or at the end of 21 years, whichever occurs earlier.  
NJ -Dog Bite - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by   NJ ST 4:19-16  

This New Jersey statute provides that the owner of any dog that bites a person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, shall be liable for such damages suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.

 
NM - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   NMSA 1978, § 28-7-3 to 28-7-5; § 28-11-1 to 28-11-6; § 77-1-15.1  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
NM - Dangerous Animal - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock.   NMSA 1978, § 77-1-10   This New Mexico statute provides that it is unlawful for any person to keep any animal known to be vicious and liable to attack or injure human beings unless such animal is securely kept to prevent injury to any person.  It is also unlawful to keep any unvaccinated dog or cat or any animal with any symptom of rabies or to fail or to refuse to destroy vicious animals or unvaccinated dogs or cats with symptoms of rabies.  
NM - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   NMSA 1978, § 3-18-3; NMSA 1978, § 77-1-1 - 20   These statutes comprise New Mexico's dog laws.  Among the provisions include municipal powers to regulate dogs, vaccination requirements, and provisions related to dangerous dogs.  
NM - Dog Bite - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock.   N. M. S. A. 1978, § 77-1-6   This short New Mexico statute provides that state health department shall prescribe regulations for the reporting of animal bites, confinement and disposition of rabies-suspect animals, rabies quarantine and the disposition of dogs and cats exposed to rabies, in the interest of public health and safety.  
NM - Impound - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock.   NMSA 1978, § 77-1-17   This New Mexico statute provides that the owner or operator of a veterinary clinic or hospital, a doctor of veterinary medicine, a kennel, grooming parlor or other animal care facility is not liable for disposing of abandoned animals after proper notice has been sent to the owner of record.  
NM - Licenses - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock.   N. M. S. A. 1978, § 77-1-15.1   This New Mexico statute provides that every municipality and each county may provide by ordinance for the mandatory licensure of dogs over the age of three months. License fees shall be fixed by the responsible municipality or county.  Further, pursuant to this statute, every municipality and each county shall provide for the impoundment of rabies-suspect animals.  
NM - Ordinances - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock   N. M. S. A. 1978, § 77-1-12  

This New Mexico statute provides that each municipality and each county shall make provision by ordinance for the seizure and disposition of dogs and cats running at large and not kept or claimed by any person on their premises provided that it does not conflict with state law.

 
NM - Property - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock.   NMSA 1978, § 77-1-1   Dogs, cats and domestic birds are considered personal property in New Mexico.  
NV - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   N. R. S. 118.105; 426.097; 426.099; 426.510; 426.515; 426.790; 426.805; 426.800; 426.810; 426.820; 484B.290; 613.330; 651.075; 704.145; and 706.366  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
NV - Dangerous Dog - Chapter 202. Crimes Against Public Health and Safety.   N. R. S. 202.500   This Nevada statute defines a "dangerous dog," as a dog, that without provocation, on two separate occasions within 18 months, behaves menacingly to a degree that would lead a reasonable person to defend him or herself against substantial bodily harm, when the dog is either off the premises of its owner or keeper or not confined in a cage or pen.  A dog then becomes "vicious" when, without being provoked, it kills or inflicts substantial bodily harm upon a human being.  If substantial bodily harm results from an attack by a dog known to be vicious, its owner or keeper is guilty of a category D felony.  Under the statute, a dog may not be declared dangerous if it attacks as a defensive act against a person who was committing or attempting to commit a crime or who provoked the dog.  
NV - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   N. R. S. 193.021; N. R. S. 202.500; N. R. S. 206.150; N. R. S. 244.359; N. R. S. 269.225; N. R. S. 503.631; N. R. S. 568.370; N.R.S. 574.600 - 670; N.R.S. 575.020   These statutes comprise Nevada's dog laws.  Among the provisions include a link to proper care requirements for companion animals, animal control ordinance provisions, and the dangerous dog law among others.  
NV - Dog Ordinance - 244.359. Ordinance concerning control of animals, license fee and designation of and requirement of liability insurance policy for inherently dangerous animals; applicability; civil liability in lieu of criminal penalty in certain circumstances   N. R. S. 244.359   This Nevada statute provides that each board of county commissioners may enact and enforce an ordinance related to dogs including licensing, regulating or prohibiting the running at large and disposal of all kinds of animals, establishing a pound, designating an animal as inherently dangerous and requiring the owner of such an animal to obtain a policy of liability insurance, among other things.  
NV - Pet Sales - Title 50. Animals. Chapter 574. Cruelty to Animals: Prevention and Penalties   N. R. S. 574.450 574.510   This Nevada statutory section comprises the state's pet sale laws.  The law protects purchasers of pets by ensuring minimum standards of care at retail pet stores and allows purchasers to return "defective" pets within ten days of purchase.  
NV - Trusts - Chapter 163. Trusts. Creation and Validity of Trusts. 163.0075. Validity of trust providing for care of one or more animals   N. R. S. 163.0075   This Nevada statute allows for a trust created for the care of one or more animals that are alive at the time of the settlor's death (note the statute does not state "domestic" or "pet" animal). Such a trust terminates upon the death of all animals covered by the terms of the trust. It further provides that a settlor's expression of intent must be liberally construed in favor of the creation of such a trust.  
NY - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 108, 110, 118, and 123-b; NY GEN OBLIG § 11-107; McKinney's Civil Rights Law § 47, 47-a to c; McKinney's Penal Law § 195.11 - 12; McKinney's Penal Law § 242.00 - .15; NY PUB HOUS § 223-b; McKinney's Social Services Law § 303-a; McKinney's Transportation Law § 147; McKinney's Vehicle and Traffic Law § 1153  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
NY - Dangerous Dog - Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws.   McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 123, 123-a   This New York statute provides that statutory penalties for dog bites and the process for declaring a dog "dangerous."  Any person who witnesses an attack or threatened attack, or in the case of a minor, an adult acting on behalf of such minor, may make a complaint of an attack or threatened attack upon a person, companion animal, farm animal, or a domestic animal to a dog control officer or police officer of the appropriate municipality. Such officer shall immediately inform the complainant of his or her right to commence a proceeding as provided in subdivision two of this section and, if there is reason to believe the dog is a dangerous dog, the officer shall forthwith commence such proceeding himself or herself. Upon a finding that a dog is dangerous, the judge or justice may order humane euthanasia or permanent confinement of the dog if one listed aggravating circumstances is established at the judicial hearing.  
NY - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 106 - 127, 331 - 332, 400 - 410; McKinney's ECL §§ 11-0529, 11-0901 - 0928, 11-2117; McKinney's General Business Law §§ 399-aa, 751 - 755; McKinney's General Municipal Law § 88, 209-cc; McKinney's General Obligations Law § 11-107; McKinney's Lien Law § 183; McKinney's Public Health Law § 1310, 505-a, 2140 - 2146; McKinney's Town Law § 130; McKinney's Vehicle and Traffic Law § 601   These New York statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include state licensing requirements, the sale of dogs by pet dealers, rabies control laws, and provisions related to dogs and hunting.  
NY - Impound - Article 5. Powers, Limitations, and Liabilities.   McKinney's General Municipal Law § 88   This New York statute provides that a municipality may by local law or ordinance provide that stray or unwanted dogs be given to an agency which trains seeing eye dogs or to a police department which trains dogs as guards.  These agencies can requisition dogs that are awaiting destruction so long as five days have elapsed since the dog was impounded.  Licensed dogs surrendered to the municipality or an animal shelter shall not be requisitioned without the written consent of the owner obtained at the time of the surrender.  
NY - Impound - Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws.   McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 118  

This New York law outlines the violations  related to licensing of  dogs. Any owner who fails to license any dog; fails to have a dog identified as required; knowingly affixes false or improper licensing, including that which identifies it as an assistance dog; fails to confine or restrain his or her dog as required; furnishes false or misleading information in connection with this article; fails to exercise diligence in handling his or her dog, which results in harm to a service dog; commits a violation. It shall be the duty of the dog control officer of any municipality to bring an action against any person who has committed within such municipality any violation of this section. Any municipality may elect either to prosecute such action as a violation under the penal law or to commence an action to recover a civil penalty.

 
NY - Licenses - Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws   McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 109   This New York statute provides that the owner of any dog reaching the age of four months shall immediately make application for a dog license. Certain villages and other municipalities may provide for differing licensure regulations as described in this statute. The statute outlines the specific application procedures for obtaining a license, including a purebred license.  
NY - Licenses - Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws. Article 7. Licensing, Identification and Control of Dogs   McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 110   This New York statute provides the schedule of license fees for all dogs.  It also enables local municipalities to enact licensing ordinances in addition to the fee proscribed by statute.  This additional revenue shall be used only for controlling dogs and enforcing this article and any rule, regulation, or local law or ordinance adopted pursuant thereto, including subsidizing the spaying or neutering of dogs and subsidizing public humane education programs in responsible dog ownership.  
NY - Municipal power - Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws.   McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 124  

This New York law provides that the commissioner is hereby authorized to (a) promulgate, after public hearing, such rules and regulations as are necessary to supplement and give full effect to the provisions of sections one hundred thirteen, one hundred fourteen and one hundred seventeen of this article; and (b) exercise all other powers and functions as are necessary to carry out the duties and purposes set forth in sections one hundred thirteen, one hundred fourteen and one hundred seventeen of this article.

 
NY - Ordinances - Article 35-D. Sale of Dogs and Cats. § 753-e. Preemption of local laws   McKinney's General Business Law § 753-e   This New York statute states that it preempts local laws regulating pet dealers, but is not intended to limit or restrict any municipality from enforcing any local law, rule, regulation or ordinance of general application to businesses governing public health, safety or the rights of consumers.  
NY - Ordinances - Chapter 62. Of the Consolidated Laws.   McKinney's Town Law § 130   This New York statute provides that a town board after a public hearing may enact, amend and repeal ordinances, rules and regulations not inconsistent with law, including the restraining of the running at large of horses, cattle, sheep, unmuzzled dogs, whether licensed or not, and those authorizing the impounding and sale of the same for the costs of keeping, proceedings and penalty, or the killing of unmuzzled dogs.  It also provides that towns may enact ordinances promoting the health, safety, morals or general welfare of the community, as long they are not inconsistent with existing law.  
NY - Pounds - Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws.   McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 115   This New York statute provides that no municipality shall be required to expend in any calendar year for dog control officer and pound or shelter services undertaken pursuant to this article, an amount of money greater than it receives during such year pursuant to this article and any local law or ordinance enacted pursuant thereto.  
NY - Property - Chapter 69. Of the Consolidated Laws.   McKinney's Agriculture and Markets Law § 366   This New York statute provides that it is a crime to steal dogs, defined as:  removing the collar, identification tag or any other identification by which the owner may be ascertained from any dog, cat or any other domestic animal; seizing or molesting any dog, while it is being held or led by any person or while it is properly muzzled or wearing a collar with an identification tag attached, except where such action is incidental to the enforcement of some law or regulation; or transporting any dog, not lawfully in his possession, for the purpose of killing or selling such dog.  
NY - Service Animal - Chapter 24-A. Of the Consolidated Laws.   McKinney's General Obligations Law § 11-107  

Under this New York statute, a disabled person whose guide, hearing or service dog is injured due to the negligence of the owner of another dog in handling that other dog may recover damages from the owner or custodian of the non-guide guide dog.  These damages include veterinarian fees, replacement or retraining costs for the guide dog, lost wages, or damages for loss of mobility during retraining or replacement of the dog.

 
OH - Dog - Chapter 955. Dogs (Consolidated dog laws)   RC §§ 955 - 01 - 99   This is the Ohio statute that regulates dogs in general, outlining rules and regulations for dog owners. The state leash requirement appears limited to rabies quarantines (Sec. 955.26).  It also gives the definition of  what is considered a dangerous or vicious dog, the rules and regulations for owners of these dogs, and penalization for breaking these rules.  
OH - Impound - Impounding Animals   R.C. § 715.23   This Ohio statute empowers municipal corporations to regulate, restrain, or prohibit the running at large of cattle, horses, swine, sheep, goats, geese, chickens, or other fowl or animals (except as otherwise provided for dogs), impound and hold these animals, and authorize the sale of the animals for the penalty imposed.  
OH - Ordinance - 955.221 County, township, and municipal corporation ordinances to control dogs   R.C. § 955.221   This Ohio statute provides that a board of county commissioners, board of township trustees, or municipal corporation may adopt and enforce resolutions to control dogs that are not otherwise in conflict with any other provision of the Revised Code.  These ordinances or resolutions to control dogs include, but are not limited to, ordinances or resolutions concerned with the ownership, keeping, or harboring of dogs, the restraint of dogs, dogs as public nuisances, and dogs as a threat to public health, safety, and welfare, except that such ordinances or resolutions shall not prohibit the use of any dog which is lawfully engaged in hunting or training for the purpose of hunting while accompanied by a licensed hunter.  
OK - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   7 Okl. St. Ann. § 12 - 13; Okl. St. Ann. § 19.1 - 19.2; 21 Okl. St. Ann. § 649.3; 41 Okl. St. Ann. § 113.1  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
OK - Dangerous dog - § 44. Definitions   4 Okl. St. Ann. § 44   This Oklahoma statute provides the definitions related to dangerous dog laws in the state, including dangerous dog, potentially dangerous dog, severe injury, and owner, among others.  
OK - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   21 Okl. St. Ann. § 1717 - 1718; 4 Okl.St.Ann. § 41 - 47; 391 - 402; 499 - 499.10; 501 - 602; OK ST T. 29 § 7-304   These statutes comprise Oklahoma's dog laws.  Among the provisions include dog control laws, sterilization provisions for adopted animals, and the use of unclaimed animals in scientific research or experimentation.  
OK - Dog bite - Oklahoma Dog Bite Laws   4 Okl. St. Ann. § 41 - 47   These statutes comprise Oklahoma's Dangerous Dog Laws.  The state imposes strict liability for dog bites; "the owner or owners of any dog shall be liable for damages to the full amount of any damages sustained when his dog, without provocation, bites or injures any person while such person is in or on a place where he has a lawful right to be."  Further, any person may lawfully kill a dog who is chasing that person's livestock.  An owner of a dog that has been adjudged "dangerous" must register the dog, enclose the dog except when out on a leash with muzzle, and post $50,000 in liability insurance.  An owner who does not follow the provisions not only faces the confiscation of his or her dog, but may also be subject to a one-year misdemeanor.  
OK - Impound - § 394. Delivery of animals on demand--Municipal ordinances relating to impoundment and scientific research   4 Okl. St. Ann. § 394   This Oklahoma statute provides that, except as otherwise provided by municipal ordinance, it shall be the duty of the pound supervisor to deliver available impounded animals to licensed research facilities unless excepted by statute.  Only dogs that have been impounded for a minimum of  15 days for a unlicensed dogs and 30 days days for licensed dogs and those dogs that were not voluntarily impounded by their owners on condition that they not be used for scientific research may be given to institutions.  
OK - Leash - Leash Law (§§ 1846 to 1852.3. Repealed by Laws 2005, c. 363, § 90, eff. Nov. 1, 2005   OK ST T. 74 § 1846.1 (Repealed)   REPEALED IN 2005: This Oklahoma leash law provides that no person shall enter a state park with a dog, except those on leash, or permit any dog owned by him to enter a state park, recreational ground or state monument without a leash.  A dog in one of these areas that is found running loose or chasing game can be killed by a park employee, who is not liable for the killing.  
OK - Licenses - § 22-115. Animals running at large--Regulation and taxation   11 Okl. St. Ann. § 22-115  

This Oklahoma statute provides that the municipal governing body may regulate or prohibit animals from running at large.  The governing body may also regulate and provide for taxing the owners and harborers of dogs, and authorize the killing of dogs which are found at large in violation of any ordinance regulating the same.

 
OK - Ordinances - § 43. Counties over 200,000 population--Regulation and control of dogs running at large--Penalties   4 Okl. St. Ann. § 43   This Oklahoma statute provides that the board of county commissioners of any county with a population of two hundred thousand (200,000) or more may regulate or prohibit the running at large of dogs and may impound and dispose of such dogs.  The board of county commissioners may also regulate and provide for taxing the owners and harborers of dogs, and authorize the humane killing or disposal of dogs, found at large, contrary to any ordinance regulating the same. Any person, firm or corporation who violates any rule or regulation made by such board of county commissioners under the authority of this act shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and shall be punished as provided by the laws of this state.  
OK - Property - § 1717. Dog as personal property   OK ST T. 21 § 1717   Dogs are considered personal property in Oklahoma.  
OK - Research - Chapter 13. Use of Unclaimed Animals for Scientific Investigation and Education.   4 Okl. St. Ann. § 391 - 402  

These Oklahoma statutes provide the rules for scientific or medical research facilities that use animals obtained from animal shelters or dog pounds.  Among the provisions are licensing procedures, inspection requirements, municipal ordinance requirements relating to duration that animals must first be impounded, and a provision specifying that anyone who fails to undertake the duties required by the act is subject to a misdemeanor.  Notably, a municipality must provide that an owner of an animal who voluntarily delivers it to a public pound has the right to specify that it not be used for scientific research; it shall be the duty of the pound superintendent to tag such animal properly and to make certain that such animal is not delivered to an institution for scientific purposes.  However, institution is immune from liability resulting from an improper delivery to such an institution.

 
OR - Animal Definitions - Chapter 87. Statutory Liens. Liens Generally. 87.142. Definitions   O. R. S. § 87.142   This is Oregon's statutory definitions for Animal Statutes.  
OR - Assistance Animal - Damages recoverable for harm or theft of assistance animal   O. R. S. § 346.687   This Oregon statute provides that a physically impaired person who uses an assistance animal or the owner of an assistance animal may bring an action for economic and noneconomic damages against any person who steals or, without provocation, attacks the assistance animal.  The measure of economic damages shall include the replacement value of an equally trained assistance animal and any other costs and expenses, including costs of temporary replacement assistance services, whether provided by another assistance animal or a person.  A cause of action will not be maintained where the individual with the assistance animal was committing a civil or criminal trespass.  
OR - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   O. R. S. § 346.687; 167.352; 609.100; 401.977  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
OR - Dangerous Dog - 609.155. Impoundment of dogs for harming or chasing livestock; tests to determine fact; costs   O. R. S. § 609.155  

This Oregon statute provides that, in a county with a dog control program, upon finding a dog engaged in killing, wounding, injuring or chasing livestock or upon receipt from a complainant of evidence that a dog has been so engaged, the dog control officer or other law enforcement officer shall impound the dog.  Tests may then be conducted to determine whether there is evidence that the dog committed the offense and then a companion statute provides an opportunity for a hearing on the facts.

 
OR - Dangerous Dog - 609.156. Opportunity of dog owner to request hearing   O. R. S. § 609.156   This Oregon statute provides that, prior to making a determination whether a dog has killed, wounded, injured or chased livestock, a county shall provide an opportunity for the dog owner to receive a hearing.  This shall be reasonably calculated to ensure that the owner apprise the dog owner of the specific behavior and incident alleged and the possible penalties, and to provide the dog owner with a fair opportunity for making the hearing request.  
OR - Dangerous Dog - 609.158. Hearings; notice of determination to owner; reexamination   O. R. S. § 609.158   This Oregon statute provides that a hearing may be conducted and a determination whether a dog has killed, wounded, injured or chased livestock may be made by the county governing body or any members thereof, the dog control board or any members thereof or a county hearings officer.  
OR - Dangerous Dog - 609.162. Guidelines for imposing reasonable measures, civil penalties or other sanctions   O. R. S. § 609.162   This Oregon statute provides that if a county determines under ORS 609.156 (2) or after a full and fair hearing that a dog has engaged in killing, wounding, injuring or chasing livestock, the county shall take action in accordance with the listed statutory guidelines.  Generally, if the dog has engaged in the chasing behavior previously, but has not killed livestock, the county will take reasonable measures to prevent another incident (pledge from owner, confine the dog, and a civil penalty(fine)).  If the dog has previously killed livestock, then the owner may be required to surrender the dog for adoption, remove the dog to an area deemed safe to livestock,  or require the dog be put to death.  If the dog killed livestock, and has previously killed livestock, the county shall require the dog be removed from a livestock area or be put to death.  
OR - Dangerous Dog - 609.163. Enhanced penalties for habitual violators   O. R. S. § 609.163  

This Oregon statute provides enhanced civil penalties (fines) for owners of dogs previously convicted of chasing, injuring, or killing livestock.  The owners must have been previously assessed a penalty to receive the enhanced fine.

 
OR - Disaster - Chapter 401. Emergency Services   Or. Rev. Stat. Ann. § 401.975, § 401.977, § 401.978; § 404.350   In Oregon, the Office of Emergency Management must prepare a written animal emergency operations plan that provides for the evacuation, transport and temporary sheltering of companion and service animals during a major disaster or an emergency. The office shall consider various factors, including allowing owners and their companion animals to be evacuated together, establishing evacuation shelters for animals in close proximity to human shelters, and establishing an identification system so that owners can locate their animals.  
OR - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   O. R. S. § 87.172, O. R. S. § 433.340 - 405; O. R. S. § 609.010 - 994; O. R. S. § 498.102, 106, and 164; O.R.S. § 646A.07 - 077   These Oregon statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing and registration requirements, rabies control laws, and a comprehensive section on damage done by dogs, especially as it concerns the destruction of livestock.  
OR - Fur - 167.390. Commerce in fur of domestic cats and dogs   O. R. S. § 167.390   In Oregon, a person may not take, buy, sell, barter or otherwise exchange for commerce in fur purposes the raw fur or products that include the fur of a domestic cat or dog if the fur is obtained through a process that kills or maims the cat or dog. Violation is a Class A misdemeanor when the offense is committed with a culpable mental state as defined in ORS 161.085.  
OR - Impound - 609.090. Impounding dogs running at large; disposition of chasing, menacing or biting dogs and other dogs; fees; release of dog   O. R. S. § 609.090   This Oregon statute provides that when a dog is running at large contrary to state or municipal law, a police or dog control officer shall impound it.  Unless claimed by its owner, a dog will be held at least five days if it has a license tag.  A "reasonable effort" shall be made to notify the keeper of a dog before the dog is removed from impoundment.  This statute also states that, upon finding that the dog has menaced or chased a person when on premises other than the premises occupied exclusively by the keeper or has bitten a person, the dog control board or county governing body may order that the dog be killed in a humane manner.  Before ordering that the dog be killed, the board or governing body shall consider the factors described in ORS 609.093 and issue written findings on those factors.  A keeper of the dog may also file a petition to prevent the destruction.  If the dog is not killed, the board or governing body may impose reasonable restrictions on the keeping of the dog.  
OR - Licenses - 609.060. Notice by publication of election result; dogs running at large prohibited; violations   O. R. S. § 609.060   This Oregon statute provides that if a governing body of a county by ordinance, or a measure approved by the electors in an election prohibits dogs from running at large, the county shall give notice, by publication in a newspaper having a general circulation in the county. If after 60 days from the notice, a keeper violates the running at large ordinance, he or she commits a Class B violation.  
OR - Ordinances - 609.015. Application of state law   O. R. S. § 609.015   This Oregon statute provides that ORS 609.030 and 609.040 to 609.110 apply in every county except as otherwise provided by county charter or ordinance. ORS 609.030 and 609.040 to 609.110 do not limit the powers of cities and counties to adopt ordinances and regulations relating to the control of dogs.  A county dog licensing and control program shall not apply within the limits of a city that has its own dog licensing and control program.  
OR - Ordinances - Application of ORS 609.156, 609.162 and 609.168 (to dog ordinances)   O. R. S. § 609.135   This Oregon statute provides that ORS 609.156, 609.162 and 609.168 (related to hearings, penalties, and reexamination for dogs found to be chasing, worrying, or injuring livestock) apply in every county having a dog control program.  It also extends other state dog provisions to counties.  
OR - Pet Dealers - 609.520. Inspection of records; procedure for obtaining animal held by dealer; failure to turn over animal; inspection of facilities   O. R. S. § 609.520   This Oregon statute sets out the right of a person to inspect a pet dealer's business for the purpose of finding a lost companion animal.  The statute also outlines acceptable methods to prove ownership and the procedure for resolving a dispute of ownership.  
OR - Property - 609.020. Dogs declared personal property   O.R.S. § 609.020   Dogs are considered personal property in Oregon.  
PA - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   3 P.S. § 459-102, 217; 18 P.S. § 5511; 43 P.S. § 952, 953; 18 Pa.C.S.A. § 7325; 75 Pa.C.S.A. § 3549  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
PA - Dangerous - § 459-507-A. Construction of article (dangerous dogs)   3 P.S. § 459-507-A   This Pennsylvania statute provides the construction of the dangerous dog chapter in the state.  It outlines the exceptions under the dangerous dog law as well as the enforcement procedure for one who is attacked by such dog.  It also specifically states that any provisions of local ordinances relating to dangerous dogs are hereby abrogated.  Further, a local ordinance otherwise dealing with dogs may not prohibit or otherwise limit a specific breed of dog.  
PA - Dog - § 550. General immunity from noise   3 P.S. § 550   This Pennsylvania statute provides that all owners and operators of dog training and special retriever training areas licensed by the Pennsylvania Game Commission shall be exempt and immune from any civil action or criminal prosecution in any manner relating to noise provided they were and remain in compliance with any applicable noise control laws or ordinances at the time the permit for establishment of the training area was authorized.  
PA - Dog Law - Chapter 8. Dogs (consolidated dog laws)   3 P.S. § 459-101 - 1205; 3 P.S. § 501, 531 - 532, 550 - 551; 34 Pa.C.S.A. § 2381 - 2386; 34 Pa.C.S.A. § 2941 - 2945   These statutes represent Pennsylvania's Dog Law, and contain provisions related to licensing, rabies quarantines, kennels, and the dangerous dog chapter.  The significant features of the law include a statewide control requirement for dogs (Section 305) and provisions for "dangerous dogs" (Section 501 et. seq.).  Under the latter, any person may kill any dog which he sees in the act of pursuing or wounding or killing any domestic animal, including household pets, or pursuing, wounding or attacking human beings, whether or not such a dog bears a required license tag.  There is no liability on such persons in damages or otherwise for such killing.  
PA - Kennels - § 551. Nuisances and injunction   3 P.S. § 551  

This Pennsylvania statute provides that the owners or operators of licensed dog training areas shall not be subject to any action for nuisance, and no court in this Commonwealth shall enjoin the use or operation of training areas on the basis of noise or noise pollution, provided that the owners were and remain in compliance with any applicable noise control laws or ordinances at the time the permit for establishment of the training areas was authorized.

 
PA - Ordinances - § 23144. To tax and destroy dogs   53 P.S. § 23144  

This briefly worded Pennsylvania statute presumably gives municipalities the authority "[t]o regulate and provide for taxing the owners and harborers of dogs, and to destroy dogs found at large contrary to any ordinance."

 
PA - Ordinances - § 459-1201. Applicability to cities of the first class, second class, second class A and third class   3 P.S. § 459-1201   This Pennsylvania statute provides that cities of the first and second class are not affected by state dog licensing programs; existing city-level programs remain in effect.  With cities of the third class, certain provisions of the state article on dog licensing shall not apply if the city has established a licensing program by ordinance.  
PA - Ordinances - § 66530. Regulation of dogs   53 P.S. § 66530 - 66531   This Pennsylvania statute provides that the board of supervisors may by ordinance prohibit and regulate the running at large of dogs.  
PA - Pet Sales - § 201-9.3. Dog purchaser protection   73 P.S. § 201-9.3   This Pennsylvania statute comprises the state's Dog Purchaser Protection law.  The law mandates disclosure of a dog's health history by a seller (defined as pet shop operator or other individual who sells dogs to the public and who owns or operates a kennel or pet shop licensed by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture or the United States Department of Agriculture).  If, within ten days after the date of purchase, a dog purchased from a seller is determined, through physical examination, diagnostic tests or necropsy by a veterinarian, to be clinically ill or dies from any contagious or infectious illness or any parasitic illness which renders it unfit for purchase or results in its death, the purchaser may exercise one of the described statutory elections.  
PA - Rabies - § 459-301. Quarantines   3 P.S. § 459-301   This Pennsylvania statute outlines the procedures and regulations relative to the state rabies quarantine procedure for dogs.  It also provides that any police officer or state dog warden may humanely kill any dog running at large in a rabies quarantined area without any liability for damages for such killing.  
PA - Sterilization - § 459-910-A. Construction of article (sterilization of dogs & cats)   3 P.S. § 459-910-A   This Pennsylvania statute relates to statutory mandatory sterilization of impounded dogs and cats.  It provides that a municipal ordinance, which meets or exceeds the state sterilization requirements, shall not be affected by this article.  
PA - Trust - § 7738. Trust for care of animal - UTC 408   20 Pa.C.S.A. § 7738  

In 2006, Pennsylvania became the 32nd state to adopt a pet trust law.  The law provides that a trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.

 
PR - Ordinances - § 4054 Municipal faculties in general   PR ST T. 21 § 4054  

This Puerto Rico statute provides that each municipality has the general power to order, regulate and resolve whatever is necessary and convenient to attend to its local needs and for its greater prosperity and development.  Among these powers is the power to regulate whatever concerns stray domestic animals, including euthanasia and disposal in interest of the public health, establishing rules and conditions under which they can be rescued by their owners, the muzzling and licensing of dogs, and the adoption and implementation of such precautionary measures that are necessary or convenient to protect the public health as it may be affected by domestic stray animals.

 
RI - Assistance Animals - Consolidated Assistance Animal Laws   Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13-4, § 4-13-16.1, § 39-2-13, § 31-18-14 - 16.1, § 34-37-4, § 40-9.1-1 - 1.5   The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance/service animal laws.  
RI - Dangerous Dog - § 4-13.1-9. Penalties for violation--Licensing ordinances and fees   Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13.1-9   This Rhode Island statute provides that a vicious dog may be confiscated by a dog officer and destroyed in an expeditious and humane manner after the expiration of a five day waiting period if an owner does not secure liability insurance, have his or her dog properly identified, or properly enclose/restrain the dog.  If any dog declared vicious under § 4-13.1-11, when unprovoked, kills, wounds, or worries or assists in killing or wounding any described animal, the owner shall pay a five hundred fifty dollar fine.  The dog officer is empowered to confiscate the dog.  The statute further provides that municipalities may enact vicious dog licensing ordinances and provide for impoundment of dogs that violate such ordinances.  It also outlines other actions owners of vicious dogs must take, including the posting of vicious dog signs and the maintenance of proper insurance.  
RI - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13-1 - 42; § 4-13.1 - 15; § 4-19-1 - 21   These statutes comprise Rhode Island's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, which are specified by county or town, vicious dog laws, and euthanasia provisions.  
RI - Immunity - § 4-15-15. Veterinarian's emergency treatment of animals--Immunity from liability   Gen.Laws 1956, § 4-15-15   This Rhode Island statute provides that any licensed veterinarian of this state has the right to treat any animal which has become injured upon any public highway of this state or upon any public or private property of this state which is transported to that veterinarian by any person.  If in the veterinarian's opinion the injuries sustained by the animal will result in death, the veterinarian has the right to apply euthanasia to eliminate any unnecessary suffering.  Further, any animal treated by the veterinarian not reclaimed within 72 hours may be relinquished to the appropriate animal control facility.  A veterinarian incurs no civil liability for actions taken in treating such animals.  
RI - Impound - § 4-13-15. Collaring of dogs--Impoundment and disposition of uncollared dogs   Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13-15   This Rhode Island statute provides that every owner of a dog must collar his or her dog around its neck and distinctly marked with its owner's name and its registered number.  Interestingly, it states that "any person" may cause any dog not so collared to be impounded in the public pound of the town or city where the dog is found.  Further, if the dog is not claimed by its owner within a period of five days after the impoundment, the dog may be disposed of or destroyed.  This statute also provides additional specific provisions for the towns of Glocester, West Warwick, and Exeter.  
RI - Ordinances - § 4-13-1. Regulatory ordinances--Enforcement and penalties   Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13-1   This Rhode Island statute first provides that city or town councils may make any ordinances concerning dogs in their cities or towns as they deem expedient, to be enforced by the destruction or disposition of the animal, or by pecuniary penalties.  It then outlines that specific ordinances that several cities are authorized to enact and what terms must be included.  
RI - Ordinances - § 4-13-1.1. Towns of Portsmouth, West Warwick, and Middletown and city of Woonsocket--Vicious dog ordinance   Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13-1.1   This Rhode Island statute provides that the town councils of the towns of Portsmouth, West Warwick and Middletown may, by ordinance, provide that the owner or keeper of any dog that assaults any person shall be fined an amount not less than one hundred dollars ($100) nor more than two hundred dollars.  The investigation must prove that the dog was off the owner's property or that the assault was the result of owner negligence.  It further provides that, in the city of Woonsocket, an owner shall not be declared negligent if an injury is sustained by a person who was committing a trespass or other tort upon the owner's premises or was teasing, tormenting, provoking, abusing or assaulting the dog or was committing or attempting to commit a crime.  
RI - Ordinances - § 4-13-15.1. Ordinances concerning unrestricted and vicious dogs prohibited--Leash laws   Gen.Laws 1956, § 4-13-15.1   This Rhode Island statute provides that city or town councils may make any ordinances concerning dogs in their cities or towns as the councils deem expedient, pertaining to the conduct of dogs.  The statute outlines specifically what the ordinances may address, including regulations relating to unrestricted dogs, leash laws, confinement, and destruction of vicious dogs.  The statute also adds additional provisions relating to the towns of Westerly and Exeter.  
RI - Ordinances - § 4-13-3. Prior ordinances preserved   RI ST § 4-13-3   This Rhode Island statute provides that nothing in the state laws concerning dogs shall be construed as to repeal any ordinance concerning dogs, which has been passed by any town or city council.  
RI - Ordinances - § 4-13-8. Disposition of license fees   Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13-8  

This Rhode Island statute provides that towns and cities may adopt ordinances or regulations concerning the use of money received for dog licenses. 

 
RI - Rabies - § 4-13-29.1. Responsibility for local rabies control   Gen. Laws, 1956, § 4-13-29.1   This Rhode Island statute provides that towns and cities are required to provide for the control of rabies in cats, dogs, and ferrets within its boundaries.  The municipality may elect to adopt into ordinance provisions at least as stringent as this chapter.  
RI - Spay/Neuter - Chapter 19. Animal Care. § 4-19-18. Penalties for violations   Gen.Laws 1956, § 4-19-18   This Rhode Island statute provides that violations of  § 4-19-16, relating to the mandatory spay/neuter agreement from a licensed releasing agency. Violations of the written agreement executed pursuant to § 4-19-16 by an adopting party are punishable by a fine of fifty dollars ($50.00) for the first offense, one hundred fifty dollars ($150) for the second offense and four hundred dollars ($400) for the third and subsequent offenses. Second and subsequent offenses may constitute grounds for seizure and forfeiture of the dog or cat.  
SC - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal Laws   Code 1976 § 2-7-35; Code 1976 § 47-3-910 - 970; Code 1976 § 43-33-10 - 70; Code 1976 § 56-5-3200 - 3220; Code 1976 § 43-26-80   The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance/service animal laws.  
SC - Bite - § 47-3-110. Liability for attacks by dogs, provoked attacks, trained law enforcement dogs.   Code 1976 § 47-3-110  

This South Carolina statute provides that if a person is bitten or otherwise attacked by a dog while the person is in a public place or is lawfully in a private place, including the property of the dog owner or person having the dog in the person's care or keeping, the dog owner or person having the dog in the person's care or keeping is liable for the damages suffered by the person bitten or otherwise attacked. If a person provokes a dog into attacking him then the owner of the dog is not liable.

 
SC - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   Code 1976 § 16-13-60; Code 1976 § 23-1-100; Code 1976 § 1-1-655; Code 1976 § 47-3-10 - 970; Code 1976 § 47-5-10 - 210; Code 1976 § 47-7-10 - 170; Code 1976 § 50-11-65, § 50-11-770, § 50-11-780, and § 51-3-145   These statutes comprise South Carolina's state dog laws.  Among the provisions include laws concerning damage done by dogs (especially to livestock), rabies control provisions, and registration requirements.  
SC - Dogfighting - Chapter 27. Animal Fighting and Baiting Act.   Code 1976 § 16-27-10 - 80   This South Carolina section comprises the state's Animal Fighting and Baiting Act.  Under the Act, any person who owns an animal for the purpose of fighting or baiting, is a party to any fighting or baiting of any animal, or obtains the use of any structure for the purpose of fighting or baiting any animal is guilty of a felony and upon conviction must be punished by a fine of $5000 or 5 years imprisonment or both.  The section also provides for seizure and forfeiture of animals used in fighting operations.  
SC - Impound - § 47-3-750. Seizure and impoundment of dangerous animal.   Code 1976 § 47-3-750   This South Carolina statute provides that if an animal control officer has probable cause to believe that a dangerous animal is being harbored or cared for in violation of Section 47-3-720 or 47-3-740 or 47-3-760(E), or Section 47-3-730, the agent or officer may petition the appropriate court to order the seizure and impoundment of the dangerous animal while the trial is pending.  
SC - Impound - § 47-3-40. Impoundment or quarantine of cat or dog running at large; release to owner.   Code 1976 § 47-3-40   This South Carolina statute provides that the county or municipal animal shelter or animal control officers shall pick up and impound or quarantine any dog running at large. To obtain release of a dog or cat, an owner must prove that the dog or cat is currently inoculated against rabies and also pay an impound or quarantine fee determined by the governing body of the county or municipality.  
SC - Impound - § 47-3-540. Destruction of identifiable dog by animal control officer; prior notification of owner   Code 1976 § 47-3-540   This South Carolina statute provides that animal control officers must not destroy any positively identifiable dog until they have notified the owner at his or her last known address by registered mail that they have the dog in their possession.  The owner then has two weeks to reclaim his or her dog, after which the animal may be destroyed.  
SC - Leash - § 50-11-780. Dogs engaged in hunting not required to be constrained by leash.   Code 1976 § 50-11-780  

This South Carolina statute provides that no dog is required to be constrained by a leash while it is actually engaged in hunting game and under supervision. As used in this section "supervision" means that the owner of the dog or his designee is either in the vicinity of the dog or in the process of trying to retrieve the dog.

 
SC - Leash - § 51-3-145. Certain acts unlawful at state parks.   Code 1976 § 51-3-145   This South Carolina law contains a dog leash provision that states that it is unlawful for any person to bring a dog or any other animal into the park or facility unless it is crated, caged, or upon a leash not longer than six feet or otherwise under physically restrictive control at all times (see section P).  This provision concerns any park or facility under the jurisdiction of the Department of Parks, Recreation and Tourism.  
SC - Ordinances - § 47-3-20. Local animal care and control ordinances authorized.   Code 1976 § 47-3-20   This South Carolina statute provides that the governing body of each county or municipality in this State may enact ordinances and promulgate regulations for the care and control of dogs, cats, and other animals and to prescribe penalties for violations.  
SC - Pet Sales - § 47-13-160. Fitness of registered companion dog or cat for sale; definitions; certifications; remedies.   Code 1976 § 47-13-160   This South Carolina statute provides that no pet dealer, pet shop, or pet breeder shall sell a registered companion dog or cat without providing to the purchaser a statement certifying that the dog or cat has received an infectious disease inoculation.  If at any time within fourteen days following the sale and delivery of a registered companion dog or cat to a purchaser, a licensed veterinarian certifies the animal to be unfit for purchase due to a noncongenital cause or condition or within six months certifies an animal to be unfit for purchase due to a congenital or hereditary cause or condition, a purchaser has the right to elect one of the following options described in the statute.  This section is apparently limited to registered dogs or cats.  
SD - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   S D C L § 20-13-23.1 - 4, 32-27-7 - 8; 40-1-38 - 40  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
SD - Bite - Chapter 40-34. Dog Licenses and Regulation (Vicious Dog Provisions)   S D C L § 40-34-13 - 15   This South Dakota statute provides that a vicious dog, defined as any dog which, when unprovoked, in a vicious manner approaches in apparent attitude of attack, or bites, or otherwise attacks a human being including a mailman, meter reader, serviceman, etc. who is on private property by reason of permission of the owner, is a public nuisance.  However, no dog may be declared vicious if an injury or damage is sustained to any person who was committing a willful trespass or other tort upon premises occupied by the owner or keeper of the dog, or who was teasing, tormenting, abusing or assaulting the dog or was committing or attempting to commit a crime.  
SD - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   S D C L §9-29-12; S D C L § 40-1-41; S D C L § 40-34-1 - 15; S D C L 40-12-1 - 6; S D C L § 41-8-15; S D C L § 41-15-14; S DC L § 41-17-18.1   These South Dakota statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, vicious dog laws, and rabies vaccination provisions.  
SD - Licenses - 40-34-5. Running at large prohibited by county--County license or tax on dogs   S D C L § 40-34-5  

This South Dakota statute provides that the board of county commissioners of each of the counties shall have the power to regulate, restrain or prohibit the running at large of dogs and to impose a license or tax on all dogs not licensed or taxed under municipal ordinance, owned or kept by any person within the county.

 
TN - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   T. C. A. § 39-14-208, 212, 216; § 44-17-403, 404; § 55-8-180; § 62-7-112; § 66-7-104, 106  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
TN - Dangerous dog - § 44-17-120. Death or serious injury; destruction of dogs   T. C. A. § 44-17-120   This Tennessee statute provides that any dog which attacks a human and causes death or serious injury may be destroyed upon the order of the circuit court where the attack occurred.  The owner shall be given notice that if he or she does not appear before the court within five days and show cause why the dog should not be destroyed, then the order shall issue and the dog shall be destroyed.  This statute also allows certain counties to make ordinances to petition a general sessions court to provide for the disposition of dangerous dogs and/or dogs causing death or serious injury to humans or other animals.  
TN - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   T. C. A. §§ 44-8-408 - 412; §§ 44-17-101 - 505; T. C. A. § 5-1-120, § 6-54-135, § 39-14-205, § 39-14-213, § 44-14-104, § 70-4-103, § 70-4-118, § 70-4-122, § 70-2-214  

These Tennessee statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements for companion animal dealers, laws concerning damage done by dogs, and the Tennessee Spay/Neuter Law.

 
TN - Impound - Rabies. § 68-8-109. Observation; confinement or quarantine.   T. C. A. § 68-8-109   This Tennessee statute provides that if any animal has bitten any person, is suspected of having bitten any person or is for any reason suspected of being infected with rabies, the animal may be required to be placed under an observation period either by confinement or by quarantine for a period of time deemed necessary by the commissioner or rules of the department.  
TN - Licenses - § 68-8-107. Seizure; adoption; destruction.   T. C. A. § 68-8-1  

This Tennessee statute mandates that any dog found running at large may be seized by any peace officer and placed in an animal shelter in counties or cities where an animal shelter or pound is available. If the dog or cat is wearing a rabies vaccination tag or other identification, all reasonable effort shall be made to locate and notify the owners who shall be required to appear within five (5) days and redeem the animal by paying a pound fee as set by the city or county legislative body.

 
TN - Ordinances - § 44-17-401. Use of electronic locating collars on dogs   T. C. A. § 44-17-401  

This Tennessee statute provides that no agency or entity of state or local government shall enact, adopt, promulgate, or enforce any law, ordinance, rule, regulation, or other policy which restricts or prevents the owner of any dog from using an electronic locating collar to protect such dog from loss.

 
TN - Ordinances - § 5-1-120. Dogs and cats; licenses, shelters and other animal control facilities   T. C. A. § 5-1-120  

This Tennessee statute outlines the broad police power counties have with respect to dog and cats.  It provides that counties, by resolution of their respective legislative bodies, may license and regulate dogs and cats, establish and operate shelters and other animal control facilities, and regulate, capture, impound and dispose of stray dogs, stray cats and other stray animals.

 
TN - Rabies - Chapter 8. Rabies   T. C. A. § 68-8-101 - 115   This chapter reflects the Tennessee Anti-Rabies Law. It is unlawful for any person to own, keep or harbor any dog or cat six (6) months of age or older that has not been vaccinated against rabies as required by this chapter. Ferrets, certain livestock, hybrid animals and other animals may be vaccinated for rabies if a vaccine is legally available for that species.  
TN - Rabies - Chapter 8. Rabies. § 68-8-108. Transportation.   T. C. A. § 68-8-108  

This Tennessee statute provides that this chapter related to rabies shall not prohibit the transportation of dogs or cats in the state; provided, that the dogs or cats are securely confined or kept on a leash while being transported in the state.

 
TX - Assistance animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   V. T. C. A., Government Code § 661.910; V. T. C. A., Human Resources Code § 121.002 - 007; V. T. C. A., Penal Code § 42.091; V. T. C. A., Transportation Code § 552.008 - 010; V. T. C. A., Health & Safety Code § 437.02  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
TX - Breeder - Chapter 802. Dog or Cat Breeders.   V. T. C. A., Occupations Code § 802.001 - 251   Under the Texas Dog or Cat Breeders Act, a person may not act as a dog or cat breeder without a license. Facilities must be inspected at least once every 18-months, and inspectors must notify the law enforcement if they discover evidence of animal cruelty or neglect. This Act also establishes a dog or cat breeder training and enforcement account that can be used for promoting consumer awareness of this chapter, and supporting education, training, and enforcement efforts.  
TX - Counseling - § 54.0407. Cruelty to Animals: Counseling Required.   V. T. C. A., Family Code § 54.0407   For juveniles convicted under the Texas criminal animal cruelty statute (found at Tex. Penal Code § 42.09), psychological counseling is required.  
TX - Dangerous - Subchapter B: Dogs That Are A Danger to Animals   V. T. C. A., Health & Safety Code § 822.011 - 013   Subchapter B prohibits dogs from running at large and enumerates the criminal penalty for such violation.  
TX - Dangerous - Subchapter D: Dangerous Dogs   V. T. C. A., Health & Safety Code § 822.041 - 047   Chapter 822, Subchapter D addresses dangerous dogs and their treatment, including dog attacks, registration, defenses, violations of the statute.  
TX - Dangerous - § 822.013. Dogs or Coyotes That Attack Animals.   V. T. C. A., Health & Safety Code § 822.013  

This Texas statute provides that a dog or coyote that is attacking, is about to attack, or has recently attacked livestock, domestic animals, or fowls may be killed by any person witnessing the attack or the attacked animal's owner or a person acting on behalf of the owner if the owner or person has knowledge of the attack.  A person who kills a dog or coyote as provided by this section is not liable for damages to the owner, keeper, or person in control of the dog or coyote.

 
TX - Dangerous - § 822.0422. Reporting of Incident in Certain Counties and Municipalities   V. T. C. A., Health & Safety Code § 822.0422   This Texas statute outlines the procedures for reporting a dangerous dog incident in counties with a population of at least 2,800,000 in which an ordinance has been adopted pursuant to this section.  It describes the reporting and seizure requirements should an owner fail to turn over an implicated dog.  
TX - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   V.T.C.A., Health & Safety Code §§ 821.076 - 081; 822.001 - 100; § 823.001 - 009; § 826.001 - 055; § 828.001 - 015; V. T. C. A., Parks & Wildlife Code § 62.0065 ; § 62.016   These Texas statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include the dangerous dog laws, registration and vaccination requirements, and sterilization laws.  
TX - Dog Bite - Subchapter A: Dogs That Are A Danger To Persons; Subchapter B. Dogs and Coyotes That Are a Danger to Animals   V. T. C. A., Health & Safety Code § 822.001 - 013   Subchapter A addresses the treatment, seizure, and disposition of dogs that are a danger to people.  This subchapter applies to any dog that causes a person's death or serious bodily injury, regardless of provocation or the location in which the incident occurred.  
TX - Fighting - § 42.10. Dog Fighting.   V. T. C. A., Penal Code § 42.10   Texas criminal statute that prohibits dog fighting. Actions ranging from causing a dog to fight with another to attending a dog fight as a spectator are prohibited. To constitute an offense, one must demonstrate the requisite intent of intentionally or knowingly.  
TX - Impound - § 826.033. Restraint, Impoundment, and Disposition of Dogs and Cats.   V. T. C. A., Health & Safety Code § 826.033   This Texas statute provides that a municipality or county may adopt ordinances or rules to require that each dog or cat be restrained by its owner and that any stray dog or cat be declared a public nuisance.  Further, it can declare that each unrestrained dog or cat be detained or impounded by the local rabies control authority.  Each stray dog or cat be impounded for a period set by ordinance or rule and a humane disposition be made of each unclaimed stray dog or cat upon its expiration.  
TX - Licenses - § 826.031. Registration of Dogs and Cats by Local Governments.   V. T. C. A., Health & Safety Code § 826.031   This Texas statute provides that the governing body of a municipality and the commissioners court of a county may adopt ordinances or rules requiring the registration of each dog and cat within the jurisdiction of the municipality or county.  Fees may be collected pursuant to such ordinances to defray costs.  
TX - Licenses - § 826.032. Registration; Criminal Penalty   V. T. C. A., Health & Safety Code § 826.032   This Texas statute provides that a person commits an offense (Class C misdemeanor) if he or she fails to or refuses to register or present for registration a dog or cat owned by the person as required by state law or local ordinance.  
TX - Ordinances - § 826.034. Restraint; Criminal Penalty.   V. T. C. A., Health & Safety Code § 826.034   This Texas statute provides that a person commits an offense (Class C misdemeanor) if the person fails or refuses to restrain a dog or cat owned by the person and the animal is required to be restrained under the ordinances or rules adopted under this chapter.  
TX - Rabies - § 826.022. Vaccination; Criminal Penalty.   V. T. C. A., Health & Safety Code § 826.022   This Texas statute provides that a person commits an offense (Class C misdemeanor) if the person fails or refuses to have each dog or cat owned by the person vaccinated against rabies and the animal is required to be vaccinated under applicable state law or local ordinance.  
TX - Rabies - § 826.045. Area Rabies Quarantine.   V. T. C. A., Health & Safety Code § 826.045   This Texas statute outlines the parameters under which a rabies quarantine area may be adopted.  If this occurs, it may call for the restraint of carnivorous animals and the transportation of carnivorous animals into and out of the quarantine area.  While the quarantine is in effect, the rules adopted by the board supersede all other applicable ordinances or rules applying to the quarantine area.  
TX - Registration - Subchapter C: Regulation of Dogs   V. T. C. A., Health & Safety Code § 822.021 - 035   Chapter 822, Sections .031 through .035 address the regulation of dogs.  Specifically, these provisions cover the registration requirements, prohibit unregistered dogs from running at large, and enumerate the treatment of dogs that attack other domestic animals.  
US - Civil Rights - Civil Action for Deprivation of Civil Rights   42 U.S.C.A. 1983  

This law is the primary means by which a person can bring a violation of a constitutional right. To prevail in a claim under section 1983, the plaintiff must meet two elements: a person subjected the plaintiff to conduct that occurred under color of state law, and this conduct deprived the plaintiff of rights, privileges, or immunities guaranteed under federal law or the U.S. Constitution. The statute provides immunity for persons operating under "color of law" acting in their official capacities.

 
US - Companion Animals - Federal Pet Theft Prevention Act (§ 2158. Protection of pets. )   7 USC 2158   This Act prohibits shelters from selling found pets within a period of five days to any random-source organization. The purpose of the Act is to prevent animals from being stolen and purchased from humane societies in order to use the animals for scientific testing or illegal purposes (such as fighting, etc.).  
US - Divorce/Custody - United States. Uniform Marital Property Act. Section 4. Classification of Property of Spouses.   ULA Marital Property Act s 4   Uniform act created to address division of marital property upon divorce in community property jurisdictions.  
US - Evacuation - Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act of 2006   Public Law 109–308 (2006)   The PETS Act, signed into law on October 6, 2006, requires that in order to qualify for Federal Emergency Management Agency funding, a city or state is required to submit a plan detailing its disaster preparedness program. The PETS Act would simply require that the State and local emergency preparedness authorities include how they will accommodate households with pets or service animals when presenting these plans to the FEMA  
US - Fighting - Animal Fighting Prohibition Enforcement Act of 2007   H.R. 137 (signed into law 05/03/2007)   The Animal Fighting Prohibition Enforcement Act of 2007 was signed into law on May 3, 2007. The law upgrades current penalties by creating felony-level jail time (up to 3 years) for violations of the federal animal fighting law, and it also prohibits interstate and foreign commerce of cockfighting weapons (e.g., knife, gaff, etc.).  
US - Housing - Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973   29 USC 794   In the context of housing discrimination, this statute creates the rule that public housing authorities cannot deny housing to a disabled person solely because of his or her disability, and that if a reasonable accommodation can be made to make housing available to a disabled person, the landlord is required to make the accommodation. To establish a prima facie case of housing discrimination, the tenant must establish four elements: (1) tenant is an individual with a disability; (2) tenant is "otherwise qualified" to receive the benefit; (3) tenant was denied the benefit of the program solely by reason of his or her disability; and (4) the program receives federal financial assistance.  
US - Pets Evacuation and Transportation Standards Act of 2006 - Chapter 68. Disaster Relief   42 U.S.C.A. § 5196 - 5196d   The FEMA Administrator is directed to develop emergency preparedness plans that take into account the needs of individuals with pets and service animals prior to, during, and following a major disaster or emergency. The Administrator must also ensure that state and local emergency preparedness plans take into account the needs of such individuals. The Administrator may make financial contributions to the States and local authorities for animal emergency preparedness purposes to accommodate people with pets and service animals.  
US - Prohibition on importation of dog and cat fur products - Chapter 4. Tariff Act of 1930.   19 U.S.C.A. § 1308  

This federal statute prohibits commerce in dog or cat fur.  Specifically, the statute forbids import into, or export from, the United States of any dog or cat fur product; or the introduction into interstate commerce, manufacture for introduction into interstate commerce, sell, trade, or advertise in interstate commerce, offer to sell, or transport or distribute in interstate commerce in the United States, any dog or cat fur product.  The exception under the act is for the importation, exportation, or transportation, for noncommercial purposes, of a personal pet that is deceased, including a pet preserved through taxidermy.

 
UT - Abandonment - § 58-28-601. Animal abandonment   U.C.A. 1953 § 58-28-601   This Utah statute provides that any animal abandoned at a veterinarian's office for a period of ten days may be sold or placed in the custody of the nearest humane society or county dog pound after giving notice to the owner.  If no humane society or dog pound is located in the county, the animal may be disposed of in a humane manner.  
UT - Assistance animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   U.C.A. 1953 § 62A-5b-101 - 107; § 41-6a-1007; § 18-1-3; § 76-9-307; § 78B-3-701 - 703  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
UT - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   U.C.A. 1953 § 10-8-65; § 4-40-101 - 102; § 18-1-1 - 3; § 23-17-8 - 9; § 23-20-3; § 26-6-1 - 15; § 26-26-1 - 7; § 58-28-601   These Utah statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include municipal pound pet sterilization provisions, rabies control laws, hunting laws that impact dogs, and laws concerning injuries caused by dogs.  
UT - Dog Bite - Title 18. Dogs. Chapter 1. Injuries by Dogs.   U.C.A. 1953 § 18-1-1 - 3  

This Utah statute provides that every person owning or keeping a dog shall be liable in damages for injury committed by such dog, and it shall not be necessary in any action brought therefor to allege or prove that such dog was of a vicious or mischievous disposition or that the owner or keeper thereof knew that it was vicious or mischievous.  This does not apply to dogs used by law enforcement officials.

 
UT - Impound - (Repealed) § 77-24-1.5. Safekeeping by officer pending disposition--Records required   U.C.A. 1953 § 77-24-1.5 (§§ 77-24-1 to 77-24-5. Repealed by Laws 2013, c. 394, § 40, eff. July 1, 2013)   §§ 77-24-1 to 77-24-5. Repealed by Laws 2013, c. 394, § 40, eff. July 1, 2013 (Formerly: this Utah statute, amended in 2011, states that each peace officer shall hold all "property" in safe custody until it is received into evidence or disposed of as provided in this chapter. He or she must also maintain a record that identifies it. Note that the provisions related to specifically to animal impoundment/euthanasia were removed.)  
UT - Impound - Chapter 46. Animal Welfare Act. Part 1. General Provisions   U.C.A. 1953 § 11-46-101 - 103   Under this act, animal control officers must hold stray animals in safe and humane custody for a minimum of 5 business days prior to making any final disposition of the animal. A stray animal may be euthanized prior to the completion of the 5-day period to prevent unnecessary suffering due to serious injury or disease.  
UT - License - § 10-8-65. Dogs--License and tax--Destruction, sale or other disposal   U.C.A. 1953 § 10-8-65  

This Utah statute, under the chapter relating the general powers of all cities, provides that cities may license, tax, regulate or prohibit the keeping of dogs, and authorize the destruction, sale or other disposal of the same when at large contrary to ordinance.

 
UT - Sterilization - Animal Welfare Act. Part 2. Animal Shelter Pet Sterilization Act   U.C.A. 1953 § 11-46-201 - 208   Under this Utah act, a shelter may not transfer an unsterilized animal for adoption unless the shelter has a written agreement in which the recipient agrees to have the animal sterilized and gives the shelter a sterilization deposit. If a recipient fails to comply with the agreement, the animal may be seized and impounded, and the recipient forfeits the deposit. A first violation may result in a civil penalty of $250.  
UT - Trusts - § 75-2-1001. Honorary trusts--Trusts for pets   U.C.A. 1953 § 75-2-1001   This Utah statute provides that a trust for the care of a designated domestic or pet animal is valid. The trust terminates when no living animal is covered by the trust. Trusts under this section shall be liberally construed to presume against the merely precatory or honorary nature of the disposition, and to carry out the general intent of the transferor.  
VA - Assistance animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6528; § 46.2-932.1 - 934; § 51.5-40.1 - 51.5-46; § 3.2-6588  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
VA - Breeder - § 3.2-6500. Definitions (definitions for commercial breeder)   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6500   Provides most recent definitions for terms used throughout the rest of the statute, including but not limited to animal shelter, commercial breeder, shelter, pet shop, and kennel. The most recent amendment took effect January 1, 2009 and provides the term "commercial breeder."  
VA - Dangerous - Dog killing other domestic animals other than livestock or poultry - § 3.1-796.117. Repealed by Acts 2006, cc. 837, 864 and 898   VA ST § 3.1-796.117 - § 3.1-796.117. Repealed by Acts 2006, cc. 837, 864 and 898   This Virginia statute provides that the governing body of any county, city or town, which has not adopted an ordinance pursuant to § 3.1-796.93:1, may adopt an ordinance to provide for the confinement of dogs which kill other dogs or domestic animals other than livestock or poultry.  
VA - Dangerous - § 3.2-6540. Control of dangerous or vicious dogs; penalties   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6540 - 6542   These Virginia statutes amended in 2013 provide the state's dangerous dog laws. The first law outlines control procedures for a dangerous dog, defined as a canine or canine crossbreed that has bitten, attacked, or inflicted injury on a person or companion animal that is a dog or cat, or killed a companion animal that is a dog or cat.. The new section deals with a "vicious dog," defined as a canine or canine crossbreed that has (i) killed a person, (ii) inflicted serious injury to a person, or (iii) continued to exhibit the behavior that resulted in a previous finding by a court or, on or before July 1, 2006, by an animal control officer as authorized by ordinance that it is a dangerous dog, provided that its owner has been given notice of that finding.  
VA - Dangerous - § 3.2-6541. Authority to prohibit training of attack dogs   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6541  

This Virginia statute provides that Fairfax County may enact an ordinance that prohibits persons from training dogs on residential property to attack.

 
VA - Dangerous - § 3.2-6553. Compensation for livestock and poultry killed by dogs   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6553   This Virginia statute states that any person who has any livestock or poultry killed or injured by any dog not his or her own shall be entitled to receive the fair market value of such livestock or poultry not to exceed $400 per animal or $10 per fowl, provided that the claimant has furnished evidence, the animal control officer was notified within seventy-two hours after discovery of the damage, and the claimant has exhausted other legal remedies.  However, local jurisdictions may by ordinance waive the last two requirements provided that the ordinance adopted requires that the animal control officer has conducted an investigation and that his investigation supports the claim.  
VA - Dog Breed - Article 11. Hybrid Canines.   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6581 - 6584   This Virginia section provides three definitions related to hybrid dogs (wolf or coyote crossbreeds), including, adequate confinement, hybrid canine, responsible ownership. The section also allows any locality may, by ordinance, establish a permit system to ensure the adequate confinement and responsible ownership of hybrid canines. Violation of an ordinance enacted pursuant to this section is a Class 3 misdemeanor for the first violation and a Class 1 misdemeanor for any subsequent violation.  
VA - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-5900 - 6590; § 29.1-516.1   These Virginia statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include laws on the sale of dogs, rabies control laws, and sections concerning damage done by dogs.  
VA - Exotic Pets - Article 11. Hybrid Canines   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6581 - 6584   This section provides Virginia's hybrid canine laws (registered or described to a veterinarian, animal control, or other listed authority as a wolf or coyote-dog cross) . Under the section, any locality may, by ordinance, establish a permit system to ensure the adequate confinement and responsible ownership of hybrid canines. Violation of an ordinance enacted pursuant to this section is a Class 3 misdemeanor for the first violation and a Class 1 misdemeanor for any subsequent violation. Further, it is the duty of any animal control officer or other officer who may find a hybrid canine in the act of killing or injuring livestock or poultry to kill such hybrid canine forthwith, whether such hybrid canine bears a tag or not.  
VA - Fur - § 3.2-6589. Selling garments containing dog or cat fur prohibited; penalty   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6589   This Virginia statute makes it illegal to sell a garment containing the fur of a "domestic" dog or cat.  Violation incurs up to a $10,000 penalty.  
VA - Licenses - § 3.2-6524. Unlicensed dogs prohibited; ordinances for licensing cats   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6524  

This Virginia statute provides that it is unlawful for any person to own a dog four months old or older in the state unless such dog is licensed.  With regard to cats, the governing body of any county, city or town may, by local ordinance, prohibit any person from owning a cat four months or older within such locality unless such cat is licensed.

 
VA - Licenses - § 3.2-6527. How to obtain license   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6527   This Virginia statute describes the process under which an individual may obtain a dog or cat license.  Generally, it states that any person may obtain a dog license or cat license if required by an ordinance by making oral or written application to the treasurer of the county or city in which such person resides, accompanied by the amount of license tax and current certificate of vaccination as required by this article.  
VA - Licenses - § 3.2-6528. Amount of license tax   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6528   This Virginia statute provides that the governing body of each county or city shall impose by ordinance a license tax on the ownership of dogs within its jurisdiction.  With regard to cats, the governing body of any county, city or town which has adopted an ordinance requiring licensing of cats shall impose by ordinance a license tax on the ownership of cats within its jurisdiction.  The tax amount may vary depending on whether the pet is male or female, and neutered or spayed.   
VA - Ordinance - § 3.2-6587. Unlawful acts; penalties   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6587   This Virginia statute describes the unlawful acts related to pets that will constitute Class 4 misdemeanors.  Included are furnishing a false license application, failing to pay license tax, violating a leash or rabies ordinance, not disposing of dead companion animals per statute, and improperly concealing a pet.  Also, a Class 1 misdemeanor may be imposed for falsely impersonating a humane officer or for falsifying a claim for animal damage.  
VA - Ordinances - § 3.2-6539. Ordinance requiring dogs to be kept on leash   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6539   This Virginia statute provides that the governing body of any city may adopt regulations or ordinances requiring that dogs to be kept on a leash or otherwise restrained and may request the court to order a referendum as to whether any such ordinance so adopted shall become effective in the city.  The results of the referendum shall not be binding upon the governing body of any such city but may be used in ascertaining the sense of the voters.  
VA - Ordinances - § 3.2-6543. Governing body of any locality may adopt certain ordinances   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6543   This Virginia statute provides that the governing bodies of counties, cities, and towns of the Commonwealth are hereby authorized to adopt, in their discretion, ordinances which parallel statutory sections dealing with licensing of dogs, taxation, impoundment, and regulation of dangerous dogs.  It also provides that nothing in this section shall be construed so as to prevent or restrict any local governing body from adopting local animal control ordinances which are more stringent than the relevant state statutory sections.  It further outlines how ordinances may impose civil penalties for violations of the above.  
VA - Property - § 3.2-6585. Dogs and cats deemed personal property; rights relating thereto   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6585   This Virginia statute provides that all dogs and cats shall be deemed personal property and may be the subject of larceny and malicious or unlawful trespass.  It further grants authority to animal control officers to seize a stolen dog or cat pending court action.  
VA - Rabies - § 3.2-6523. Inoculation for rabies at animal shelters   Va. Code Ann. § 3.2-6523   This Virginia statute provides that animals at a shelter may be inoculated by a licensed veterinary technician who is under the direct supervision of a veterinarian when an emergency rabies ordinance has been issued by a city or county.  
VA - Rabies - § 32.1-48.3. Regulations of Commissioner covering local ordinances and requirements   Va. Code Ann. § 32.1-48.3   This Virginia statute specifically authorizes preemption of local control in the event of a rabies outbreak.  It states that if the governing body of the county or city in which the outbreak exists does not adopt ordinances, regulations and measures to prohibit the running at large of dogs and to prevent the spread of rabies, the State Health Commissioner is authorized to adopt regulations providing for the matters contained in such sections and to enforce the same in the same manner as if they had been specifically adopted by the governing body of the county or city involved.  
VT - Assistance animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   13 V.S.A. § 355; 9 V.S.A. § 4502 - 4507; 23 V.S.A. § 1057  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
VT - Dogs, Wolf-hybrids - Consolidated Dog Laws   20 V.S.A. § 3511 - 3513; 3541 - 3817, 3901 - 3915, 4301 - 4304; 10 V.S.A. § 5001 - 5007, § 4748   These Vermont statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include licensing and control laws for both domestic dogs and wolf-hybrids, laws concerning the sale of dogs, and various wildlife/hunting laws that implicate dogs.  
VT - Hunting - § 4502 Uniform point system; revocation of license.   10 V.S.A. § 4502   Vermont has a point system for hunting licenses similar to that used for driver's licenses.  Certain enumerated violations, including taking bear or deer with dogs, earn points which can result in the suspension or revocation of a hunting license.   A game warden may shoot a dog who is pursuing a deer or moose close enough to endanger its life, or a fine may be issued.  
VT - Lost dog - Article 2. Killing Unlicensed Dogs; Subchapter 5. Control of Rabies   20 V.S.A. § 3621 - 3626; § 3806; 20 V.S.A. § 3806 - 3809   These Vermont statute provide the law for seizure, confinement of, and destruction of dogs and domestic wolf-hybrids.  It also includes a warrant form necessary for local authorities to seize and impound an offending dog or wolf-hybrid.  
VT - Ordinances - § 2291. Enumeration of powers (dog ordinances)   24 V.S.A. § 2291  

This Vermont statute provides that, for the purpose of promoting the public health, safety, welfare and convenience, a town, city or incorporated village shall have the power to regulate the keeping of dogs, and to provide for their leashing, muzzling or restraint.

 
WA - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   West's RCWA 9.91.170 - 175; 49.60.010 - 040, 218, 222; 49.60.370 - 380; 70.84.010 - 900  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
WA - Dangerous Dog - 16.08.040. Dog bites—Liability and Dangerous dogs and related provisions.   West's RCWA 16.08.010 - 100  

This Washington statute outlines the state's dangerous dog laws.  Under the law, the owner or keeper of any dog shall be liable to the owner of any animal killed or injured by such dog for the amount of damages sustained in a civil action.  Further, there is strict liability for the owner of any dog that bites any person while in a public place or lawfully on a private place including the property of the owner of such dog, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.  However, proof of provocation of the attack by the injured person shall be a complete defense to an action for damages. 

 
WA - Dangerous Dog - 16.08.070. Dangerous dogs and related definitions   West's RCWA 16.08.070   This Washington statute provides the definitions related to dangerous dogs, including dangerous dog, potentially dangerous dog, severe injury, and owner, among others.  
WA - Dangerous Dog - 16.08.090. Dangerous dogs--Requirements for restraint   West's RCWA 16.08.090   This Washington statute outlines the state and local provisions related to dangerous or potentially dangerous dogs.  It first provides that it is unlawful for an owner of a dangerous dog to permit the dog to be outside the proper enclosure unless the dog is muzzled and restrained by a substantial chain or leash and under physical restraint of a responsible person.  Potentially dangerous dogs shall be regulated only by local, municipal, and county ordinances and nothing in this section limits restrictions local jurisdictions may place on owners of potentially dangerous dogs.  
WA - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   West's RCWA 4.24.410; 9.08.010 - 90; West's RCWA 9.91.170 - 175; 16.10.010 - 40; 16.54.010 - 40; 16.70.010 - 60; 36.49.020 - 070; 77.12.315; 77.15.240, 245, 440; 77.32.525; 77.32.540   These Washington statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include vaccination requirements, dog control zones in municipalities, dangerous dog laws, and provisions concerning hunting with dogs.  
WA - Lost Dog - Chapter 63.21. Lost and Found Property.   West's RCWA 63.21.010 - 900   This statutory section comprises Washington's lost property statues.  
WA - Ordinances - 16.10.040. Dog control zones--Regulations--License fees, collection, disposition   West's RCWA 16.10.040   This Washington statute provides that the county commissioners shall by ordinance promulgate the regulations to be enforced within a dog control zone. These shall include provisions for the control of unlicensed dogs and the establishment of license fees.  
WA - Ordinances - 35.27.370. Specific powers enumerated   West's RCWA 35.27.370  

This Washington statute provides that the council of said town shall have power to pass ordinances not in conflict with the Constitution and laws of this state, or of the United States.  Specifically, the council may regulate, restrain, or prohibit the running at large of any and all domestic animals within the city limits, or any part or parts thereof, and to regulate the keeping of such animals within any part of the city; to establish, maintain and regulate a common pound for estrays, and to appoint a poundkeeper, who shall be paid out of the fines and fees imposed on, and collected from, the owners of any impounded stock.

 
WA - Ordinances - 35.30.010. Additional powers   West's RCWA 35.30.010   This Washington statute provides that the council, or other legislative body, of all cities within the state of Washington which were created by special charter prior to the adoption of the state Constitution, and which have not since reincorporated under any general statute, shall have, in addition to the powers specially granted by the charter of such cities, the power to impose and collect an annual license not exceeding two dollars on every dog owned or harbored within the limits of the city.  They may also make all such ordinances, bylaws and regulations, not inconsistent with the Constitution and laws of the state of Washington, as may be deemed expedient to maintain the peace, good government and welfare of the city, and to do and perform any and all other acts and things necessary and proper to carry out the purposes of the municipal corporation.  
WA - Trusts - Chapter 11.118. Trusts--Animals   West's RCWA 11.118.005 - 110   The purpose of this chapter is to recognize and validate certain trusts that are established for the benefit of animals (nonhuman animal with vertebrae).  The trust can be for one or more animals provided they are individually identified or labeled in the instrument so that they may be easily identified.  Unless otherwise provided in the trust instrument or in this chapter, the trust will terminate when no animal that is designated as a beneficiary of the trust remains living.   
WI - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   W. S. A. 106.50; 106.52; 346.26; 951.01, .097, .18  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
WI - Dangerous dog - 174.11. Claims for damage by dogs to domestic animals including ranch mink   W. S. A. 174.11   This Wisconsin provides that the owner of any domestic animal, including a ranch mink, which is attacked, chased, injured or killed by a dog may, within 3 days after the owner has knowledge or notice thereof, file a written claim for damages with the clerk of the town, village or city in which the damage occurred.  A hearing then occurs where witnesses may be subpoenaed under oath, and testimony relative to the claim is taken.  The county board shall allow, as the amount of a claim for a domestic animal, including a ranch mink, injured by a dog, the amount determined to be the total of the costs resulting from the injury including a loss in fair market value but the total amount of the claim may not exceed the fair market value.  
WI - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   W. S. A. 1.10; 29.184; 29.921; 29.927; 29.971; 169.20 - 36; 173.01 - 40; 174.001 - 15   These Wisconsin statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include dog licensing provisions, hunting laws impacting dogs, and seizure of dogs by humane officers.  
WI - Dog Bite - Chapter 174. Dogs. 174.12. Actions against owners   W. S. A. 174.12   This Wisconsin statute outlines the allowance procedure by counties for damage done by dogs after a claim is filed and the county sues to recover from the owner of the damaging dog.  The claimant shall first be notified that such action is contemplated and shall have been given a reasonable opportunity to be heard and to offer further evidence in support of the claimant's claim.  It also provides that this chapter shall not in any way limit the existing right or authority of any town, village or city to pass ordinances for the keeping and regulating of dogs, or repeal or annul any existing statute or ordinance or local regulation governing the keeping and regulating of dogs.  
WI - Dog, licenses - Chapter 174. Dogs. 174.06. Listing   W. S. A. 174.06   This Wisconsin statute provides that every town, village and city shall annually, by September 1, ascertain by diligent inquiry the dogs owned or kept within the assessment district.  The listing official shall enter in the records for personal property assessments, or in a separate record, all dogs in the district subject to tax, to whom they are assessed, the name, number, sex, spayed or unspayed, neutered or unneutered, breed and color of each dog.  
WI - Dog, licenses - Dogs. 174.07. Dog licenses and collar tags   W. S. A. 174.07  

This Wisconsin statute provides for collection of delinquent dog license fees.

 
WI - Impound - 173.13. Taking custody of animals   W. S. A. 173.13   This Wisconsin statute provides that a humane officer may take into custody (impound) an animal that he or she has reasonable grounds to believe is abandoned, stray, unwanted, unlicensed/untagged, not in compliance with an ordinance or quarantine, has caused damage, has been a participant in a fight, is the victim of cruelty, or was delivered by a veterinarian under the provisions of this statute.  If the owner of the impounded animal is known to the humane officer, then the officer shall promptly notify the owner in writing if he or she can be identified and located with reasonable effort.  
WI - Ordinances - 59.52. County administration   W. S. A. 59.52  

This Wisconsin statute provides a schedule for destruction of obsolete town records, which includes dog licenses after three years.

 
WI - Ordinances - 59.54. Public protection and safety   W. S. A. 59.54  

This Wisconsin statute provides that a local board may enact ordinances regulating the keeping, apprehension, impounding and destruction of dogs outside the corporate limits of any city or village, but such ordinances shall not conflict with ss. 174.01 and 174.042, and such ordinances may not apply in any town that has enacted an ordinance under s. 60.23(30).

 
WI - Ordinances - Subchapter IV. Town Board. 60.23. Miscellaneous powers   W. S. A. 60.23   This Wisconsin statute provides that the town board may enact and enforce ordinances, and provide forfeitures for violations of those ordinances, that are the same as or similar to ordinances that may be enacted by a county to regulate dogs running at large under s. 59.54(20).  
WI - Rabies - 95.21. Rabies control program   W. S. A. 95.21   Under this Wisconsin statute, rabies vaccinations are required for dogs, and they must be revaccinated once every year. The owner must attach the rabies vaccination tag to a collar, which must be kept on the dog at all time. The tag must have the serial number of the vaccination certificate, the year the vaccination was given and the name, address and telephone number of the supervising veterinarian. An owner who fails to have a dog vaccinated against rabies may be required to forfeit $50 to $100.  
WV - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   W. Va. Code, § 5-15-1 - 8; 19-20-2  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
WV - Dangerous - § 19-20-21. License fee for keeping vicious or dangerous dog.   W. Va. Code, § 19-20-9a; § 19-20-20 - 21   These West Virginia statutes provide that any person who owns or harbors any dog, cat or other domesticated animal, whether licensed or unlicensed, which bites any person, shall confine and quarantine the animal for a period of ten days for rabies observation.  The state apparently has a prohibition against owning a dangerous dog, such that no person shall own, keep or harbor any dog known by him to be vicious, dangerous, or in the habit of biting or attacking other persons, whether or not such dog wears a tag or muzzle.  However, another section provides that any person who keeps a dog which is generally considered to be vicious, for the purpose of protection, shall acquire a special license therefor from the county assessor and then keep the dog restrained/enclosed.  
WV - Dangerous - § 20-2-16. Dogs chasing deer   W. Va. Code, § 20-2-16   This West Virginia statute mandates that no person shall permit his dog to hunt or chase deer.  A conservation officer shall take into possession any dog known to have hunted or chased deer and the director shall advertise that such dog is in his possession, giving a description of the dog and stating the circumstances under which it was taken.  The owner then has ten days to reclaim the dog.  If after a bona fide but unsuccessful effort to capture dogs detected chasing or pursuing deer, an officer may kill the offending dogs.  
WV - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws   W. Va. Code, §§ 5A-4-4; § 7-7-6d; § 19-9-1 - 40; § 19-20-1 - 26; § 19-20A-1 - 8; § 19-20B-1 - 6; § 19-20C-1 - 3; § 20-2-5; § 20-2-5f; § 20-2-16; § 20-2-22a; § 20-2-56a   These West Virginia statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include registration requirements, rabies control, and hunting laws that impact dogs.  
WV - Impound - § 19-20-8. Impounding and disposition of dogs; costs and fees   W. Va. Code, § 19-20-8   This West Virginia statute provides that dogs seized and impounded as provided in this article shall be kept housed and fed in the county dog pound for five days after notice of seizure and impounding has been given or posted.  Upon expiration this time period, all dogs which have not previously been redeemed by their owners shall be sold or humanely destroyed (this statute outlines what constitutes "humanely destroyed").  The owner may, at any time prior to the expiration of five days retrieve his or her dog by paying the requisite fees and satisfying any other provisions.  
WV - Leash - § 5A-4-4. Unlawful to kill or molest animals, birds or fowls upon grounds of capitol; powers and duties of security officers; penalties.   W. Va. Code, § 5A-4-4   This West Virginia statute aims at protecting the state capitol grounds and governor's mansion from disturbance.  In doing so, it makes it unlawful for any person to knowingly allow a dog owned by him or her to be upon the grounds of the capitol buildings or governor's mansion unless such dog is under control by leash. Any person who knowingly allows a dog owned by him to be upon the grounds of the capitol buildings or governor's mansion while not under control by leash shall be guilty of a misdemeanor, and, upon conviction thereof, be fined not less than twenty-five nor more than one hundred dollars.  Other interesting provisions are included in this law.  
WV - Licenses - § 7-7-6d. Collection of head tax on dogs; duties of assessor and sheriff; registration of dogs; disposition of head tax; taxes on dogs not collected by assessor   W. Va. Code, § 7-7-6d, WV ST § 7-7-6d   This West Virginia statute provides that it is the duty of the county assessor at the time of assessment of the personal property within such county, to assess and collect a head tax of one dollar on each male or spayed female dog and of two dollars on each unspayed female dog.  In addition to the above, the assessor and his deputies shall have the further duty of collecting any such head tax on dogs as may be levied by the ordinances of each and every municipality within the county.  The tax also serves the function of providing a registration for the dog.  Any person who refuses to pay the tax after a specified period may have his or her dog seized, which may then be sold or eventually destroyed.  
WV - Ordinances - § 19-20A-8. Vaccinated dogs and cats may run at large; confinement may be required by the commissioner of agriculture within the limits of any quarantine area or locality; and ordinances or rules may be promulgated by any county commission or municipality relating to the control and management of dogs within the county; providing limited exemption for hunting and farm dogs from county commission or municipality action   W. Va. Code, § 19-20A-8   This West Virginia statute provides that dogs or cats vaccinated in compliance with the provisions of this article may run at large in any area or locality unless a county commission or a municipality has adopted and enforced ordinances to prevent dogs from running at large.  The state commissioner of agriculture may also enforce an at large ban when a rabies quarantine is in effect.  However, any county commission or municipality may not adopt any ordinance which purports to keep any vaccinated dog from running at large while engaged in any lawful hunting activity; from running at large while engaged in any lawful training activity; or from running at large while engaged in any lawful herding or other farm related activity.  
WY - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws   WY ST § 35-13-201 - 206  

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

 
WY - Dangerous - Article 1. In General. (Dangerous Dog Provisions)   WY ST § 11-31-105 - 108   This Wyoming statute provides that every person, firm, copartnership, corporation or company owning any dog, which to his knowledge has killed sheep or other livestock, shall exterminate and destroy the dog.  
WY - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws   WY ST § 6-5-211; § 11-31-101 - 108; § 11-31-201 - 214; § 11-31-301; § 15-1-103; § 23-3-109; § 33-30-215   These Wyoming statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Among the provisions include damage done to livestock by dogs, rabies vaccination requirements, and municipal powers to regulate dogs.  
WY - Impound - § 33-30-215. Disposition of unclaimed animals in custody of veterinarians; notice to owner; liability of veterinarians; “abandoned animals”   WY ST § 33-30-215   This Wyoming statute states that any animal placed in the custody of a licensed veterinarian for treatment, boarding, or other care, which is then unclaimed by its owner for a period of more than ten days after written notice is given to the owner at his or her last known address, shall be deemed to be abandoned.  It may then be turned over to the nearest humane society or dog pound in the area where it may be disposed of as the shelter sees fit.  
WY - Ordinances - § 11-31-301. Public nuisance; notice; penalties; rules and regulations; animal control districts and officers   WY ST § 11-31-301  

This Wyoming statute provides that a board of county commissioners may declare the running at large of any specified animals in unincorporated areas within the county limits a public nuisance.  Dogs or other animals, whose ownership cannot be determined, may be destroyed.  A dog injuring or killing livestock may be killed by the owner of the livestock or his agent or any peace officer.  However, any dog attacking any person in a vicious manner may be impounded by the county sheriff or animal control officer and held in quarantine for at least fifteen (15) days and not more than twenty (20) days after the attack to determine whether the dog has any disease which may be communicated to humans.  A board of county commissioners may enact regulations relative to dogs running at large, vicious dogs, dogs running wild game or livestock or acts by other animals which shall carry out the purposes of this section.  The county may also establish a county license fee and an animal control program/facility.

 
WY - Ordinances - § 15-1-103. General powers of governing bodies   WY ST § 15-1-103  

This Wyoming statute provides that the governing bodies of all cities and towns may regulate or prohibit the running at large within the city limits of any animals, impose a license fee for the keeping or harboring of dogs and establish and provide for the operation of a pound.  They may also abate nuisances (dogs at large are defined as such), establish quarantines, and enact other ordinances for the general health, safety, and welfare of the community.

 

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