New Jersey Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
New Jersey Revision of Statutes 1709-1877: Chapter XII Supplement: An act for the prevention of cruelty to animals. N.J. Rev. Stat. 64-82 (1873)

A supplement to the New Jersey Revision of Statutes for 1877.  The supplement covered standing for officer's of New Jersey Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals.  In addition, the supplement addresses the question of jurisdiction for the enforcement the anti-cruelty laws.

New Jersey Revision of Statutes 1709-1877: Chapter XII: An act for the prevention of cruelty to animals. N.J. Rev. Stat. §§ 64-82 (1873)

A compilation of the New Jersey anti-cruelty laws as of 1877. The laws covered include treatment of animals, penalties, and exceptions for scientific experiments.

NJ - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws N.J.S.A. 2A:42-109; 10:5-5; 10:5-29.1 - 11; 39:4-37.1; 48:3-33; App. A:9-43.2; 2C:29-3.1, 3.2; 48:3-33; 18A:46-13.3; 36:2-213

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

NJ - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes NJSA 4:22-10 to 4:22-60

These New Jersey statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty provisions.  According to the definitional section, "animal" or "creature" includes the whole brute creation.  Exclusions under the act include state regulated scientific experiments, state sanctioned killing of animals, hunting of game, training of dogs, normal livestock operations, and the killing of rats and mice.  With regard to livestock practices, no person may be cited or arrested for a first offense involving a minor or incidental violation of any provision of this title involving alleged cruelty to domestic livestock unless that person has first been issued a written warning. 

NJ - Disaster - App. A:9-43.15. Emergency evacuation; boarding of public transportation or public transportation service with domestic companion animal N.J.S.A. App. A:9-43.15

This New Jersey law states that in the event that a state of emergency has been declared and an evacuation of any region of the State is in progress, the owner of a domestic companion animal shall be permitted to board any public transportation or public transportation service with the domestic companion animal so long as that animal is under the owner's control by use of a leash or tether, or is properly confined in an appropriate container or by other suitable means, provided that such boarding is authorized by and consistent with the provisions of the State Emergency Operations Plan. Addtionally, all passengers with service animals shall be given priority seating on all means of transportation.

NJ - Disaster - Article 6. Emergency Powers of Governor N. J. S. A. App. A:9-43.2

In New Jersey, the State Office of Emergency Management, and each county and municipality, is directed to adopt a emergency operations plans that include provisions to support the needs of animals and individuals with an animal under their care, including a service animal, in a major disaster or emergency.

NJ - Dog Bite - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by N. J. S. A. 4:19-16

This New Jersey statute provides that the owner of any dog that bites a person while such person is on or in a public place, or lawfully on or in a private place, including the property of the owner of the dog, shall be liable for such damages suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.

NJ - Dog - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by. NJSA 4:19-15.1 to 4:19-15.33

These New Jersey statutes comprise the laws for licensing, impounding, appointment of animal control officers, and kennel/pet shop regulations.  It also includes a provision that prohibits impounded animals from being sold or donated for experimentation, as well as pet sterilization provisions..

NJ - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws N. J. S. A. 2A:42-101 to 2A:42-113; 2C:29-3.1; 4:19-1 to 4:19-43; 4:19A-1 - 17; 4:21B-1 - 3; 4:22A-1 to 13; 23:4-25, 26, 46; 26:4-78 - 95; 40:48-1

These statutes comprise New Jersey's dog laws.  Among the provisions include laws regarding domesticated animals in housing projects, rabies control laws, licensing requirements, and dangerous dog laws.

NJ - Domestic Violence - Chapter 25. Domestic Violence N. J. S. A. 2C:25-26, 27,28, 29 On January 17, 2012, Governor Christie signed the Domestic Violence Pet Protection Law . The law authorizes courts to include pets in domestic violence restraining orders. The court is allowed to enter an order " . . . directing the possession of any animal owned, possessed, leased, kept, or held by either party or a minor child residing in the household. Where a person has abused or threatened to abuse such animal, there shall be a presumption that possession of the animal shall be awarded to the non-abusive party." This is listed in N. J. S. A. 2C:25-29(b)(19). Other sections are provided for definitions and background to section 29.
NJ - Education - 18A:35-4.25. Right of pupil to refuse participation in dissection activities N.J.S.A. 18A:35-4.25 This New Jersey law allows a public school pupil from kindergarten through grade 12 to refuse to dissect, vivisect, incubate, capture or otherwise harm or destroy animals or any parts thereof as part of a course of instruction. The school must notify pupils and parents at the beginning of each school on the right to decline participation. Any pupil who chooses to refrain from participation in or observation shall be offered an alternative education project for the purpose of providing the pupil with the factual knowledge, information or experience required by the course of study. A pupil shall not be discriminated against, in grading or in any other manner, based upon a decision to exercise the rights of this act.
NJ - Endangered - Chapter 2A. Wildlife Generally NJSA 23:2A-1 to 23:2A-1:15

These statutes comprise the New Jersey Endangered and Nongame Species Conservation Act.  The definitions used in the Act are described as well as the rules for listing species, the powers and duties of the supervising department, and the designation of funding.  Under the statute, violation of the Act incurs a civil penalty of $250-5,000. In 2014, provisions were added for the prohibition on import, sale, or purchase of ivory products.

NJ - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 15. Equestrian Activities. NJSA 5:15-1 to 5:15-1 12

This New Jersey equine activity liability statute fist begins by setting forth the legislative recognition of the importance of equine activities to the state and the fact that eliminating the inherent risks in engaging in them is impractical or impossible.  Further, a participant and spectator are deemed to assume the inherent risks of equine animal activities created by equine animals, and is assumed to know the range of his ability and it shall be the duty of each participant to conduct himself within the limits of such ability.  This acknowledgment of the assumption of risk serves as a complete bar of suit and shall serve as a complete defense to a suit against an operator by a participant for injuries resulting from the assumed risks (excluding the exceptions outlined in the statute).

NJ - Fur - Chapter 14. Fur Products. NJSA 56:14-1 to 56:14-3

This law represents New Jersey's fur labeling law. Under the 2009 law, no person shall sell or offer to sell any new coat, jacket, garment or other clothing apparel made wholly or in part of fur, regardless of the price or value of the fur without the name of the animal(s) used to produce the fur and the name of the country of origin of any imported fur. A person who violates this act shall be subject to a penalty of not more than $500 for the first offense and not more than $1,000 for each subsequent offense, to be collected in a civil action by a summary proceeding.

NJ - Fur - Unlawful Trapping (Article 2. Manner, Means and Times of Hunting) NJSA 23:4-20 to 23:22.8

This set of New Jersey laws describes what constitutes "unlawful trapping." The section prohibits pole traps with a fine of $20 for each pole trap illegally used. Further, the law states that no person shall manufacture, sell, offer for sale, possess, import, transport or use an animal trap of the steel-jaw leghold type. A person using a steel-jaw leghold type animal trap shall be fined not less than $50.00 nor more than $250.00 for a first offense; not less than $250.00 nor more than $500.00 for a second offense; not less than $500.00 nor more than $2,500.00 for a third or subsequent offense.

NJ - Horse Slaughter - 4:22-25.5. Prohibition upon slaughter of horses for human consumption; punishment N. J. S. A. 4:22-25.5

This New Jersey law enacted in 2012 makes it a disorderly persons offense to knowingly slaughter a horse for human consumption. Additionally, it makes the knowing sale or barter of horseflesh for human consumption a disorderly persons offense. Violation incurs a fine of not less than $100 and a term of imprisonment of not less than 30 days.

NJ - Hunting - 23:4-24.5. Computer-assisted remote hunting prohibited; definitions; exception for certain hunters N. J. S. A. 23:4-24.5

This New Jersey law prohibits computer-assisted remote hunting or providing or operating facilities for computer-assisted remote hunting in the State.

NJ - Hunting - Chapter 7A. Preventing Lawful Taking of Wildlife. NJ ST 23:7A-1 to 23:7A-3

This set of New Jersey laws comprises the state's hunter harassment provisions. No person may, for the purpose of hindering or preventing the lawful taking of wildlife. A person who violates this act shall be liable to a civil penalty of not less than $100 nor more than $500 for each offense. In addition to bringing a civil action for injunctive relief or any other relief provided by law, a person who is adversely affected by a violation of this act may bring a civil action for damages, including punitive damages and special damages, against the violator.

NJ - Impound - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJSA 4:19-26

This New Jersey statute provides that, if a dog is declared vicious or potentially dangerous, the owner of the dog shall be liable to the municipality in which the dog is impounded for the costs and expenses of impounding and destroying the dog. The municipality may establish by ordinance a schedule of these costs and expenses.

NJ - Impound - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by. NJSA 4:19-9

This New Jersey statute provides that a person may humanely destroy a dog in self defense, or which is found chasing, worrying, wounding or destroying any sheep, lamb, poultry or domestic animal.

NJ - License - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJSA 4:19-31

This New Jersey statute provides that every municipality may, by ordinance, fix the sum to be paid annually for a potentially dangerous dog license and each renewal thereof, which sum shall not be less than $150 nor more than $700. In the absence of any local ordinance, the fee for all potentially dangerous dog licenses shall be $150.

NJ - Licenses - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJSA 4:19-15.11

This New Jersey statute provides that dog license fees collected under this chapter shall be used by municipalities for the following purposes only; for collecting, keeping and disposing of dogs liable to seizure under this act or under local dog control ordinances; for local prevention and control of rabies; for providing antirabic treatment under the direction of the local board of health for any person known or suspected to have been exposed to rabies, for payment of damage to or losses of poultry and domestic animals, except dogs and cats, caused by a dog or dogs and for administering the provisions of this act.

NJ - Licenses - 4Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJSA 4:19-1

This New Jersey statute provides the regulations for dog taxes except in taxing districts where the running at large of dogs is regulated by ordinance.

NJ - Licenses - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJSA 4:19-4

This New Jersey statute provides that the collected sum from dog taxes shall be used by a municipality to make good any loss which may be sustained by any person by the destruction or wounding of his sheep, lambs, domestic animals or poultry, except dogs and cats.

NJ - Lien, horse stable - 2A:44-51. Right of lien; retention of property when amount due unpaid N. J. S. A. 2A:44-51

This New Jersey law relates to liens on those who keep horses. The law states that every keeper of a livery stable or boarding and exchange stable shall have a lien on all animals left in livery, for board, sale or exchange (and upon all carriages, wagons, sleighs and harness left for storage, sale or exchange) for the amount due for the board and keep of such animal. The keeper has the right, without process of law, to retain the same until the amount of such indebtedness is discharged. Note that the law states “keeper of a livery stable” shall include, but need not be limited to, a proprietor of a stable, a trainer, a veterinarian, a farrier, or any other person who has a financial relationship with the owner of the horse.

NJ - Ordinance - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by. NJSA 4:19-15.12

This New Jersey statute provides that a municipality may by ordinance, fix the sum to be paid annually for a dog license and each renewal thereof, which sum shall be not less than $1.50 nor more than $21.00.  The statute also also provides upper and lower limits for three-year licenses.

NJ - Ordinances - Chapter 19. Dogs, Taxation and Liability for Injuries Caused by NJSA 4:19-36

This New Jersey statute provides that the provisions of the dangerous dog act shall supersede any law, ordinance, or regulation concerning vicious or potentially dangerous dogs, any specific breed of dog, or any other type of dog inconsistent with this act enacted by any municipality, county, or county or local board of health.

NJ - Pet Sales - Pet Purchase Protection Act N. J. S. A. 56:8-92 to 56:8-97

This New Jersey Act protects pet purchasers who receive "defective" companion animals.  A purchaser of a defective pet must have his or her pet examined by a veterinarian within 14 days of purchase to receive a refund or exchange.  Alternatively, a buyer may retain the pet and be reimbursed for veterinary bills up to two times the cost of the dog or cat.

NJ - Pet Trusts - Trusts for care of domesticated animals NJSA 3B:11-38

This New Jersey statute provides that a trust for the care of a domesticated animal is valid.  Trusts under this section terminate when no living animal is covered by the trust, or at the end of 21 years, whichever occurs earlier.

NJ - Veterinary - Chapter 16. Veterinary Medicine, Surgery and Dentistry. NJSA 45:16-1 to 45:16-18

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.