Michigan Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort descending Summary
MI - Initiatives - Michigan Proposal 3 (mourning dove hunting) 2006 Michigan Proposal 3

In 2006, Michigan voters were presented with Proposal 3 that would have legalized the hunting of mourning doves by adding the species to the state game list. The measure was defeated by a 69 to 31 percent vote.

MI - Cruelty - Legislative Analysis HOUSE BILLS 4550-4552 (legislative analysis)

This document is the legislative analysis for House Bills 4551 and 4552. The bills (now law) amend the penal laws (MCL 750.50) to revise the penalties for harming animals and allow for consecutive sentencing.  Both bills would exempt veterinarians and veterinarian technicians from the prohibitions and penalties when lawfully engaging in the practice of veterinarian medicine. Under the new law, a court could order a term of imprisonment imposed for a violation prohibited under the bills to be served consecutively to a term of imprisonment imposed for any other crime including any other violation of law arising out of the same transaction. 

MI - Exotic pets - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. WOLF-DOG CROSS ACT. M. C. L. A. 287.1004

This Michigan statute provides the requirements for ownership of wolf-dog hybrids in the state.

MI - Exotic pets - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. WOLF-DOG CROSS ACT. M. C. L. A. 287.1021

Under this Michigan statute, a local unit is empowered to adopt an ordinance governing wolf-dog crosses that is more restrictive than this act, provided it fulfills the  requirements of this act in addition to any other requirements governing a wolf-dog cross under state and federal law.

MI - Exotic Pets - Chapter 287. Animal Industry; Large Carnivore Act M. C. L. A. 287.1101 - 1123

This Michigan law bans acquisition and possession of large carnivores (big cats and bears), though it “grandfathered” animals already owned as pets at the time of the law's enactment. In order to maintain public safety and animal welfare, the state created a strict permit system for those owners who were allowed to keep their already-existing pets.  The statute also outlines minimal care requirements, transportation guidelines, and procedures for when a large carnivore suspected of carrying rabies bites a human or livestock. (See also link to Chapter 287. Animal Industry; Wolf-dog Cross Act; link to 287.731- Importation of species having potential to endanger life or property prohibited; importation of wild or exotic animals; requirements and prohibitions ).

MI - Leash - 287.262. Licensing and control of dogs; hunting dogs; female dogs in heat; straying dogs M. C. L. A. 287.262

This section of the Dog Law of 1919 provides that any dog over six months must be registered and wear a collar at all times.  It also mandates that female dogs in heat must be kept on their owners' premises or restrained on a leash.  The overall leash requirement is less clear, stating that it is unlawful for an owner to allow a dog " to stray unless held properly in leash."  This does appear to mandate a statewide leash requirement for dogs, however.

MI - Ordinances - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. DOG LAW OF 1919. M. C. L. A. 287.289a

This Michigan law provides that a board of county commissioners may establish, by ordinance, an animal control agency.  The animal control agency shall have jurisdiction to enforce this act in any city, village or township which does not have an animal control ordinance. The county's animal control ordinance shall provide for animal control programs, facilities, personnel and necessary expenses incurred in animal control. 

MI - Ordinances - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY. DOG LAW OF 1919. M. C. L. A. 287.290

This Michigan statute enables a city, village or township to adopt an animal control ordinance to regulate the licensing, payment of claims and providing for the enforcement thereof.

MI - Dangerous - Chapter 287. Animal Industry. Dangerous Animals. M. C. L. A. 287.321 - 323

This Michigan statute defines "dangerous animal," which means a dog or other animal that bites or attacks a person, or a dog that bites or attacks and causes serious injury or death to another dog while the other dog is on the property or under the control of its owner.  However, a dangerous animal does not include any of the following:  an animal that bites or attacks a person who is knowingly trespassing on the property of the animal's owner; an animal that bites or attacks a person who provokes or torments the animal; or an animal that is responding in a manner that an ordinary and reasonable person would conclude was designed to protect a person if that person is engaged in a lawful activity or is the subject of an assault.

MI - Livestock - Chapter 287. Animal Industry. Animal Industry Act M. C. L. A. 287.701 - 747

This Michigan act is known as the “animal industry act." The act is intended to protect the health, safety, and welfare of humans and animals, by requiring disease testing of imported animals, certification, and reporting of infected animals. A newly amended section (287.746) also concerns the tethering or confinement of animals such as pregnant sows and veal calves in manners that restrict lying, standing, fully extending limbs, or turning freely.

MI - Exotic Pets - CHAPTER 287. ANIMAL INDUSTRY; ANIMAL INDUSTRY ACT M. C. L. A. 287.731

Michigan completely prohibits the importation into the state of “any species having the potential to spread serious diseases or parasites, to cause serious physical harm, or to otherwise endanger native wildlife, human life, livestock, domestic animals, or property.” For other wild or exotic animals, Michigan regulates various aspects of their importation, such as requiring physical exams by vets, negative disease tests, and proper animal care and restraint. (See also link to Chapter 287. Animal Industry - Large Carnivore Act ; link to Wolf-dog Cross Act ).

MI - Endangered - Part 365. Endangered Species Protection M. C. L. A. 324.36501 - 07

The state of Michigan defines an endangered species as "any fish, plant life, or wildlife that is in danger of extinction throughout all or a significant part of its range, other than a species of insecta determined by the department or the Secretary of the United States Department of the Interior to constitute a pest whose protection under this part would present an overwhelming and overriding risk to humans."  Violation of the taking provision constitutes a misdemeanor punishable up to 90-days in jail and/or up to $1,0000 in fines.

MI - Wildlife Conservation -Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M. C. L. A. 324.41101 - 41105

These sections describe the regulatory powers of the Department of Natural Resources in issuing conservation orders protecting fish, game, and birds.

MI - Hunting - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M. C. L. A. 324.41701 - 41712

These sections set out the guidelines for private shooting preserves, including the species of wild animals and birds permitted to be hunted.

MI - Lost Property - Chapter 434. Lost and Unclaimed Property. Lost Property. M. C. L. A. 434.21 - 29

This section comprises Michigan's Lost Property statutes.

MI - Domestic Violence - 600.2950. Personal protection orders; current or former spouse, dating relationship, or housemate M. C. L. A. 600.295 This Michigan law relates to an action for a personal protection order to restrain/enjoin several categories of individuals: (1) a spouse or former spouse; (2) a person with whom the petitioner has a child in common; (3) a person in a dating relationship with petitioner; or (4) an individual who resided or is residing in the same household as the petitioner. Effective August 1, 2016, the order may now restrain or enjoin those mentioned individuals from engaging in the following actions if that person has the intent to cause the petitioner mental distress or to exert control over the petitioner with respect to an animal in which the petitioner has an ownership interest: (1) injuring, killing, torturing, neglecting, or threatening to injure, kill, torture, or neglect the animal; (2) removing the animal from the petitioner's possession; or (3) retaining or obtaining possession of the animal. Section 30 describes the criteria under which a petitioner is deemed to have an ownership interest in an animal.
MI - Pet Trusts - Chapter 700. Estates and Protected Individuals Code. Estates and Protected Individuals Code. M. C. L. A. 700.2722

This Michigan statute provides that a trust for the care of a designated domestic or pet animal is valid (these trusts follow the terms for non-charitable trusts and thus, can be of a duration of up to 21 years). The trust terminates when no living animal is covered by the trust.  Extrinsic evidence is admissible to prove the transferor's intent and the court may reduce the amount of the property transferred if it determines that that amount substantially exceeds the amount required for the intended use.

MI - Cruelty - 712A.18l. Juveniles, guilty of cruelty to animals or arson; court ordered psychiatric or psychological treatment M. C. L. A. 712A.18l

This statute provides that if a juvenile is found to be within the court's jurisdiction for an offense that, if committed by an adult, would be a violation of the Michigan penal code relating to either cruelty to animals or arson, the court shall order that the juvenile be evaluated to determine if he or she needs psychiatric or psychological treatment. If the court determines that psychiatric or psychological treatment is appropriate, the court may order that treatment in addition to any other treatments or penalties allowed by law.

MI - Hunting, Internet - 750.236a. Engaging in, providing or operating facilities for, or providing or offering to provide equipment specially adapted for computer-assisted shooting M. C. L. A. 750.236a. 236b, 236c

A person in Michigan is not allowed to: (1) engage in computer-assisted shooting; provide or operate, with or without remuneration, facilities for computer-assisted shooting; or (3) provide or offer to provide, with or without remuneration, equipment specially adapted for computer-assisted shooting. Violation is a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 93 days or a fine of not more than $500.00, or both.

MI - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes (MCL 750.49 - 70) M. C. L. A. 750.49 - 70; M.C.L.A. 750.158

The Michigan Legislature has designed three primary provisions related to cruelty to animals: intentional infliction of pain and suffering, duty to provide care, and anti-animal fighting.  The intentional infliction of pain and suffering provision carries the most severe penalties for animal cruelty and a violation is automatically a felony.  A violation of the duty to provide care provision is initially a misdemeanor, which becomes a felony for a second or subsequent violation.  A violation of the anti-animal fighting provision is either a misdemeanor or a felony, depending on the severity of conduct related to fighting.  The provision does not apply to the lawful killing of livestock or customary animal husbandry of livestock, or lawful fishing, hunting, trapping, wildlife control, pest or rodent control, and animal research.

MI - Cruelty - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. M. C. L. A. 750.51

This Michigan law provides that no railroad company shall permit the confinement of animals in railroad cars for longer than 36 consecutive hours without unloading for rest, water, and feeding of at least 5 consecutive hours unless prevented by a storm, or other "accidental causes." Any company, owner or custodian of such animals, who does not comply with the provisions of this section, can be fined between $100 and $500 for each and every such offense. However, when animals are carried in cars where they have proper food, water, space and opportunity for rest, the provisions of this section that require unloading do not apply.

MI - Dog Bite - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M. C. L. A. 750.66a

This Michigan law, which becomes effective January of 2009, provides that a person 18 years of age or older who is responsible for controlling the actions of a dog or wolf-dog cross and the person knows or has reason to know that the dog or wolf-dog cross has bitten another person shall remain on the scene. A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 93 days or a fine of not more than $500.00, or both.

MI - Enforcement - Chapters 760 to 777 Code of Criminal Procedure. M. C. L. A. 764.16

This law authorizes private citizens to make arrests.

MI - Ordinances - Chapters 81 to 113 Fourth Class Cities. M. C. L. A. 91.1

This Michigan statute provides that a city incorporated under the provisions of this act has, and the council may pass ordinances relating to, the following general powers:  To provide for the issuing of licenses to the owners and keepers of dogs and to require the owners and keepers of dogs to pay for and obtain such licenses; and to regulate and prevent the running at large of dogs, to require dogs to be muzzled, and to authorize the killing of dogs running at large or not licensed in violation of an ordinance of the city.

MI - Constitutional Provisions - Protection of Natural Resources M. C. L. A. Const. Art. 4, § 52

This section declares the protection, conservation, and development of the state's natural resources to be of paramount public concern and the legislature shall provide for the protection of the air, water and other natural resources of the state from pollution, impairment and destruction.

MI - Constitutional Provisions - Michigan Natural Resources Trust Fund M. C. L. A. Const. Art. 9, § 35

The trust fund consists of all bonuses, rentals and royalties collected or reserved by the state under provisions of leases for the extraction of nonrenewable resources from state owned lands.

MI - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws M.C.L. 287.261 - 395; 317.63; 324.73101 - 42106

The regulation of dogs and cats in Michigan implicates three major issues: licensing and registration of dogs; the regulation of animal control facilities and pet shops; and the ever-present concern of dog bites.  The primary statutory vehicle that regulates the licensing requirements for dogs is the The Dog Law of 1919. Under the dog law, it is unlawful for any person to own a dog six months or older unless the dog is licensed. MCL § 287.262. It is also unlawful for a person to own a dog six months or older that does not wear a collar and tag at all times, except when engaged in hunting activities accompanied by his or her owner. MCL § 287.262. A female dog that is in heat may not go beyond her owner’s premises unless properly held on a leash under this section.

MI - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 287. Animal Industry. Humane Slaughter of Livestock. M.C.L.A. 287.551 - 556

A typical state law that imposes the requirements of humane slaughter upon the commercial operations of the state.  The law describes humane methods of slaughter, which include ritual slaughter methods.  It also makes the statement that no slaughterer, packer or stockyard operator shall shackle, hoist or otherwise bring livestock into position for slaughter by any method which shall cause injury or pain.  However, the director, by administrative order, may exempt from compliance with this act, for a period not to exceed 1 year after the effective date of this act, any slaughterer, packer or stockyard operator if he finds that an earlier compliance would cause such person an undue hardship.  Any person who violates any provision of this act shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

MI - Fish & Wildlife Law Enforcement - Part 16. Enforcement of Laws for Protection of Wild Birds, Wild Animals, and Fish M.C.L.A. 324.1501 - 1615

These sections lay out the powers, including the power to serve criminal process, and jurisdiction of conservation officers, peace officers, and volunteer conservation officers.

MI - Pollution - Environmental Protection Act: Pollution (Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act) M.C.L.A. 324.1701 - 1706

These sections lay out the process and standards to determine a pollution violation, actions for declaratory and equitable relief, the burden of proof, and affirmative defenses to such violations.

MI - Habitat Protection - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.30101 - 301113

These sections describe the necessity and process of obtaining a permit to build a marina, canal or any other project that affects any inland lake, stream or bottomland.

MI - Habitat Protection - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.30301 - 30329

These sections describe prohibited acts as well as permissible uses of land designated as wetlands. Municipal and wetland ordinances are also described.

MI - Great Lakes - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.32101 - 32206

These sections describe the authorization of the compacts and the powers and duties of the commissioners of the Great Lakes compact commission and the Great Lakes Basin compact.

MI - Habitat Protection - Wilderness, Wild, and Natural Areas (Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act) M.C.L.A. 324.35101 - 35111

These sections define, identify, and set guidelines for the protection of wilderness, wild, and/or natural areas.

MI - Biological Diversity - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.35501 - 35506

These Sections describe the State's desire to conserve biological diversity as well as the State's strategy and considerations in achieving this goal. These sections also create the joint legislative working committee on biological diversity.

MI - Hunting - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.40112

This law makes it a crime to interfere or obstruct someone in the lawful taking of animals.

MI - Transgenic and Nonnative Organisms - Chapter 324.Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act M.C.L.A. 324.41301 to 324.41305

The following Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act sections lists which transgenic and non-native organisms are either restricted or prohibited in the state of Michigan. In addition to listing a species as prohibited or restricted, the statute also grants authority to the Commission of Natural Resources (for all species except insects or plants) and to the Commission of Agriculture (for insect and plant species only) to add or delete an organism from either list. The statute also provides exceptions—with qualifications—to possessing a restricted or prohibited species; provisions in which a person can introduce a prohibited or restricted species; and circumstances in which a person is not considered to be in possession of a restricted or prohibited species.

MI - Hunting - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.41901 - 41905

These sections describe the powers of the Department of Natural Resources to regulate and even to close areas to hunting.

MI - Trapping - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.42501 - 42507

These sections describe the regulations for trapping for furs, hides and pelts. This includes the requirement for a fur dealer's license and for a monthly report of all pelts on hand.

MI - Hunting - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.42701 - 42714

These sections describe the licensing of and regulations of breeders and dealers, including zoological parks. These sections also describe the parameters for enclosures and pens.

MI - Foxes - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.43101 - 43104

These sections lay out the regulations and prohibited acts with regard to foxes in captivity.

MI - Hunting - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.43301 - 43303

These sections place limitations on acreage held for sporting purposes and on acreage within 2 miles of other lands held for sporting purposes.

MI - Hunting and Fishing Licenses - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.43501 - 43531b

These sections describe the required licenses for each type of game animal or aquatic species.

MI - Hunting and Fishing Licenses, Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act M.C.L.A. 324.43532 - 43561 These sections describe the required licenses for each type of game animal or aquatic species.
MI - Fishing - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.45101 - 45711

These sections describe the regulations of fishing from inland waters and with hook and line. These sections also describe the regulations regarding the taking of frogs and mussels.

MI - Fishing - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.48701 - 48727

These sections lay out the guidelines for sport fishing including legal fishing devices, the open season for each species as well as the minimum legal size requirement for each species of fish.

MI - Fishing - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.48728 - 48740 These sections lay out the guidelines for sport fishing including legal fishing devices, the open season for each species as well as the minimum legal size requirement for each species of fish.
MI - Fish & Wildlife, Generally Powers - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.501 - 507

These sections lay out the creation, jurisdiction, powers and duties of the Michigan Department of Natural Resources.

MI - Hunting/Recreational Trespass - Chapter 324. Natural Resources and Environmental Protection Act. M.C.L.A. 324.73101 - 73301

These sections describe the Department of Natural Resources ability to enforce and prosecute persons who enter upon the land of another, who remove or destroy signs or posters or enclose someone else's land without permission. These sections also describe the potential liability of landowners.

MI - Wolves - Control of gray wolves, § 324.95151 to 324.95167 M.C.L.A. 324.95151; M.C.L.A. 324.95153; M.C.L.A. 324.95155; M.C.L.A. 324.95161; M.C.L.A. 324.95163; M.C.L.A. 324.95165; M.C.L.A. 324.95167 This chapter of Michigan laws deals with the removal, capture, or destruction of gray wolves. According to the laws, a landowner is able to use any means necessary to remove a gray wolf from its property, including lethal force, if the gray wolf is threatening the landowners livestock or dog(s). Once a landowner has removed, captured, or destroyed a gray wolf, the landowner must report it to a department official no later than 12 hours after the removal, capture, or destruction. According to Section 324.95167, the act is not operative until final appellate court issues a decision overruling the decision of The Humane Society of the United States v Dirk Kempthorne that allows removal of wolves from the federal ESA list, or the U.S. Fish & Wildlife Service promulgates a final rule dated after March 12, 2007 that removes gray wolves located in this state from the list of endangered and threatened wildlife established under the federal endangered species act of 1973 and that final rule takes effect.

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