Indiana Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort descending Summary
IN - Wild Animal - Chapter 25. Importation Permit I.C. 14-22-25-1 - 4

In Indiana, a person needs a permit to import live fish or any living wild animal into the state for release. A permit may be granted only upon proof that the animals are free of a communicable disease, will not become a nuisance, and will not cause damage to a native wild or domestic species.

IN - Exotic pet - Chapter 26. Wild Animal Permit. I.C. 14-22-26-1 to 6 This set of Indiana laws concerns the keeping of protected and dangerous wild animals. Under the law, a person must obtain a permit to possess these classes of animals. A permit may be suspended if an emergency exists (e.g., the animal is in peril or the animal is in a position to harm another animal).
IN - Wild Animal - Chapter 28. Permit to Take, Kill, or Capture Wild Animal Damaging Property I.C. 14-22-28-1 - 5

A person whose property is being damaged by a protected wild animal may be issued a free permit to take, kill, or capture the wild animal. The director prescribes how the animal is taken, when the permit expires, and the disposition of the animal. The director may deny a permit if the wild animal is not causing the damage or the person would abuse the privileges.

IN - Endangered Species - Chapter 34. Nongame and Endangered Species Conservation I.C. 14-22-34-1 to 21

These Indiana statutes set out the definitions related to endangered species and prohibit any form of possession of listed species, including taking, transporting, purchasing or selling except by permit.  Listed species may be removed, captured, or destroyed if it is shown by good cause that the species are causing property damage or are a danger to human health.

IN - Hunting - Chapter 37. Harassment of Hunters, Trappers, and Fishermen I.C. 14-22-37-1 to 14-22-37-3

This section reflects Indiana's hunter harassment law. A person who knowingly or intentionally interferes with the legal taking of a game animal by another person with intent to prevent the taking commits a Class C misdemeanor. A person who fails to obey the order of a law enforcement officer to desist from conduct in violation of section 2 of this chapter commits a Class B misdemeanor if the law enforcement officer (1) observed the person or (2) has reasonable grounds to believe that the person has engaged in the conduct that day or intends to engage in the conduct that day on specific premises.

IN - Exotic Pet - Chapter 2. Definitions I.C. 14-8-2-87

This Indiana statute provides the definition of an exotic mammal, which does not include a feral cat or dog.

IN - Hunting - 15-17-14.7-13 Types of weapons allowed during hunt; computer assisted remote hunting; sedation; restricted areas I.C. 15-17-14.7-13 This Indiana law states that a hunting preserve may not allow computer assisted hunting.
IN - Health - Article 17. Animal Health and Animal Products. Chapter 18. Crimes and Infractions I.C. 15-17-18-1 - 13

This set of Indiana laws covers diseased livestock and the sale of domestic animals. It also provides that a person responsible for livestock or poultry who knowingly or intentionally permits the livestock or poultry to run at large commits a Class B misdemeanor. Another provision states that a person may not import to or export from Indiana for the purpose of sale any dog under the age of eight (8) weeks unless the dog is transported with its dam.

IN - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 5. Meat and Poultry Inspection; Humane Slaughter Act I.C. 15-17-5-1 to 31

This Indiana statutory section comprises both the state's meat processing laws and humane slaughter provisions.   The state board responsible for carrying out this Act are empowered to adopt rules governing humane methods to make livestock or poultry insensible to pain before incision of an instrument for severance of the carotid arteries. The rules must conform as far as applicable to the regulations promulgated under the Federal Humane Slaughter Act.  Most of the laws in this section pertain to inspection of commercial livestock facilities and the labeling of postmortem and antemortem animals.  However, violation of the humane slaughter provisions appear to result in a Class B misdemeanor where there has been a "reckless violation."

IN - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws I.C. 15-17-6-1 - 14; 25-38.1-4-8 ; 15-20-2-1 - 7; 6-9-39-1 - 9; 35-46-3-15; 15-20-3-1 - 4; 14-22-11-1; 14-8-2-89

These Indiana statutes comprise the state's dog laws.  Included are provisions on rabies, liability of owners for dog bites or damage to livestock, and taxation and registration laws, among others.

IN - Dog Ordinances - Chapter 1. Liability for Dog Bites I.C. 15-20-1-1

This Indiana statute provides that the chapter related to dog bite law does not limit the power of an agency of the state or a political subdivision to adopt a rule or an ordinance that does not conflict with this chapter.

IN - Breeder - Article 21. Commercial Dog Breeder Regulation I.C. 15-21-1-1 - 15-21-1-7

The laws set forth requirements for commercial breeders in Indiana, defined as  a person who maintains more than twenty (20) unaltered female dogs that are at least twelve (12) months of age. These laws do not apply to humane societies, rescue groups, certain service and hunting dog breeders, foster homes, or hobby breeders. A person may not operate a commercial dog breeder or broker operation without first registering with the state. Failure to register is a Class A misdemeanor. The chapter sets forth minimum standards of care and requires that a breeder comply with federal standards of care set forth in 9 CFR 3.1 through 9 CFR 3.12. Enforcement of the chapter will fall to the Indiana state board of animal health, which may seek injunctive relief and impose civil penalties ranging from $500 - $5,000 for violations.

IN - Property - (Repealed by P.L.162-2006, SEC.49.) - Dogs as Personal Property for Taxation I.C. 15-5-10-1 (Repealed by P.L.162-2006, SEC.49.)

Dogs are considered personal property in Indiana (repealed).

IN - Veterinary - Article 38.1. Veterinarians. I.C. 25-38.1-1-1 to 25-38.1-5-5

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

IN - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws I.C. 3-11-9-5; 9-21-17-21; 16-32-3-1 - 5; 22-9-6-5; 22-9-5-9.5; 22-9-5-20; 22-9-7-1 - 15; 35-31.5-2-295; 35-46-3-11.5

These statutes comprise Indiana's assistance animal/guide dog laws.

IN - Trust - 30-4-2-18. Trust to provide for care of an animal alive during settlor's lifetime I.C. 30-4-2-18

Indiana's pet trust law was enacted in 2005. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or upon death of last surviving animal alive during settlor’s lifetime. Property of a trust authorized by this section may be applied only to the trust's intended use, except to the extent the court determines that the value of the trust property exceeds the amount required for the trust's intended use.

IN - Liens - 32-33-8-1 Feed and care bestowed upon livestock; mechanic's and tradesman lien I.C. 32-33-8-1

This statute allows the keeper of a livery stable or any person engaged in feeding horses, cattle, hogs, and other livestock to place a lien on any of the animals that he or she cares for.

IN - Domestic Violence - 34-26-5-9 Ex parte orders; authority and jurisdiction of court; relief available I.C. 34-26-5-9 This Indiana law allows a court to grant ex parte orders for protection in cases of domestic or family violence. Effective July 1, 2017, a court may grant a petitioner the exclusive possession, care, custody, or control of any animal owned, possessed, kept, or cared for by the petitioner, respondent, minor child of either the petitioner or respondent, or any other family or household member. Additionally, the court may prohibit a respondent from removing, transferring, injuring, concealing, harming, attacking, mistreating, threatening to harm, or otherwise disposing of an animal described in subdivision (5).
IN - Equine Activity Statute - Chapter 5. Equine Activities I.C. 34-31-5-1 to 5

This Indiana statute states that an equine activity sponsor or equine professional is not liable for an injury to a participant or the death of a participant resulting from an inherent risk of equine activities.  Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes reckless disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant.  The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs or warnings provided in contracts that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law.

IN - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes I.C. 35-46-3-0.1 - 15; 36-8-3-18

These Indiana statutes set forth the anti-cruelty laws.  As used in this chapter, "animal" does not include a human being.  A person having a vertebrate animal in the person's custody who recklessly, knowingly, or intentionally abandons or neglects the animal commits cruelty to an animal, a Class B misdemeanor.  A person who knowingly or intentionally purchases or possesses an animal for the purpose of using the animal in an animal fighting contest commits a Class A misdemeanor.

IN - Bite - Indiana Dog Bite Laws IC 15-20-1-1 - 7; IC 35-47-7-4

These Indiana statutes provide the state's dog bite laws.  If a dog, without provocation, bites any person who is peaceably conducting himself in any place where he may be required to go for the purpose of discharging any duty imposed upon him by the laws of this state or by the laws or postal regulations of the United States of America, the owner of such dog may be held liable for any damages suffered by the person bitten, regardless of the former viciousness of such dog or the owner's knowledge of such viciousness.  It also establishes the conditions under which an owner will be criminally liable if his or her dog bites another person.  In Indiana, physicians treating dog bite injuries are required to report such injuries not more than 72-hours after the incident.

IN - Spay, neuter - Chapter 4. Spay-Neuter Requirement for Animal Care Facilities IC 15-20-4-1 - 5 This Indiana chapter added in 2016 concerns the spay-neuter requirements for animal care facilities. Beginning July 1, 2021, except as provided in this chapter, a companion animal shall be spayed or neutered before adoption from an animal care facility.
IN - Initiatives - Question 1, Right to Hunt and Fish Amendment Question 1 Question 1 is a legislatively referred constitutional amendment that appears on the 2016 general election ballot. The official summary states the following: "Provides that the right to hunt, fish, and harvest wildlife is a valued part of Indiana's heritage and shall be forever preserved for the public good. Provides that the people have a right, which includes the right to use traditional methods, to hunt, fish, and harvest wildlife, subject only to the laws prescribed by the general assembly and rules prescribed by virtue of the authority of the general assembly to: (1) promote wildlife conservation and management; and (2) preserve the future of hunting and fishing. Provides that hunting and fishing are the preferred means of managing and controlling wildlife. Provides that this constitutional amendment does not limit the application of any laws relating to trespass or property rights. This proposed amendment has been agreed to by one general assembly." A "yes" vote is in favor of such a constitutional amendment and a "no" vote is against amending the state constitution.