Anti-Cruelty: Related Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
ME - Cruelty, reporting - § 4011-A. Reporting of suspected abuse or neglect 22 M. R. S. A. § 4011-A This Maine statute relates to mandatory reporting of suspected child abuse or neglect and permissive reporting of suspected animal abuse or neglect. With regard to animal-related issues, subsection (1)(A)(29) requires a humane agent employed by the Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry to report suspected child abuse or neglect as outlined in the statute. Subsection (1-A) makes an animal control officer (as defined in Title 7, section 3907, subsection 4) a "permitted reporter" who may report to the department when that person knows or has reasonable cause to suspect that a child has been or is likely to be abused or neglected. Finally, subsection (6) allows all the described reporters in subsection (1) to be permissive reporters of suspected animal cruelty, abuse, or neglect. These individuals may report a reasonable suspicion of animal cruelty, abuse or neglect to the local animal control officer or to the animal welfare program of the Department of Agriculture, Conservation and Forestry.
Mexico - Cruelty - La Ley General de Equilibrio Ecológico y Protección al Ambiente General Law of Ecological Balance and Environmental Protection This law focuses on the sustainable use of the environment and wildlife, the preservation and restoration of the ecosystems. It seeks to protect the national biodiversity and establish and manage protected areas. It establishes that, to protect and sustainably use the flora and fauna, it is important, among other things, to encourage dignified and respectful treatment of animals to avoid cruelty against them. Moreover, it establishes that it is the duty of the federal government, the states, and the municipalities within their respective power to regulate the dignified and respectful treatment of animals (arts 78-79). The regulation of this treatment must be based on the following principles: (1) provide animals with enough water and food in order to keep them healthy and healthy; (2) provide animals with an adequate environment for their rest, movement, and space according to the species; (3) provide animals with adequate veterinary care and, in case of illness, provide prompt veterinary treatment; (4) allow animals to express their natural behavior; and (5) provide animals with adequate treatment and conditions to guarantee their well-being.
MI - Cruelty - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. M. C. L. A. 750.51 This Michigan law provides that no railroad company shall permit the confinement of animals in railroad cars for longer than 36 consecutive hours without unloading for rest, water, and feeding of at least 5 consecutive hours unless prevented by a storm, or other "accidental causes." Any company, owner or custodian of such animals, who does not comply with the provisions of this section, can be fined between $100 and $500 for each and every such offense. However, when animals are carried in cars where they have proper food, water, space and opportunity for rest, the provisions of this section that require unloading do not apply.
MI - Cruelty - 712A.18l. Juveniles, guilty of cruelty to animals or arson; court ordered psychiatric or psychological treatment M. C. L. A. 712A.18l This statute provides that if a juvenile is found to be within the court's jurisdiction for an offense that, if committed by an adult, would be a violation of the Michigan penal code relating to either cruelty to animals or arson, the court shall order that the juvenile be evaluated to determine if he or she needs psychiatric or psychological treatment. If the court determines that psychiatric or psychological treatment is appropriate, the court may order that treatment in addition to any other treatments or penalties allowed by law.
MI - Cruelty - 752.91. Sale of dyed or artificially colored baby chicks, rabbits or ducklings M. C. L. A. 752.91 - 92 This law makes it unlawful for any person, firm or corporation to sell, or offer for sale, any baby chicks, rabbits, ducklings, or other fowl or game which have been dyed or otherwise artificially colored. Violation is a misdemeanor.
MI - Cruelty - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M.C.L.A. 750.52 (Repealed by P.A.2015, No. 210, § 1(f), Eff. March 14, 2016) Note: Repealed by P.A.2015, No. 210, § 1(f), Eff. March 14, 2016. This statute provides that it is the duty of the officials involved in animal cruelty investigations to arrest and prosecute those committing the offenses where there is knowledge or reasonable notice of the acts. The failure or neglect by an officer involved to do so may result in a misdemeanor.
MI - Cruelty - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M.C.L.A. 750.50b This is the felony animal cruelty law in Michigan. Under the law, a person is guilty of killing or torturing animals if they: (a) knowingly kill, torture, mutilate, maim, or disfigure an animal; (b) commit a reckless act knowing or having reason to know that the act will cause an animal to be killed, tortured, mutilated, maimed, or disfigured; (c) knowingly administer poison to an animal, or knowingly expose an animal to any poisonous substance, with the intent that the substance be taken or swallowed by the animal; or (d) violate or threaten to violate subdivision (a) or (c) with the intent to cause mental suffering or distress to a person or to exert control over a person. Whether the offense becomes a first, second, or third degree felony depends on listed factors, including whether the animal is a companion animal (as defined in the law). A first degree felony conviction results in imprisonment up to 10 years, a fine of not more than $5,000, and/or community service for not more than 500 hours. As a part of the sentence, the court may order the defendant to pay the costs of the prosecution and the costs of the care, housing, and veterinary medical care for the animal victim, and the court may order the defendant to not own or possess an animal for ANY period of time including permanent relinquishment. Lawful killing of animals including fishing, hunting, pest control, and scientific research are excluded.
MI - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes (MCL 750.49 - 70) M. C. L. A. 750.49 - 70a; M.C.L.A. 750.158 The Michigan Legislature has designed three primary provisions related to cruelty to animals: intentional infliction of pain and suffering, duty to provide care, and anti-animal fighting. The intentional infliction of pain and suffering provision carries the most severe penalties for animal cruelty and a violation is automatically a felony. A violation of the duty to provide care provision is initially a misdemeanor, which becomes a felony for a second or subsequent violation. A violation of the anti-animal fighting provision is either a misdemeanor or a felony, depending on the severity of conduct related to fighting. The provision does not apply to the lawful killing of livestock or customary animal husbandry of livestock, or lawful fishing, hunting, trapping, wildlife control, pest or rodent control, and animal research.
MI - Cruelty - Legislative Analysis HOUSE BILLS 4550-4552 (legislative analysis)

This document is the legislative analysis for House Bills 4551 and 4552. The bills (now law) amend the penal laws (MCL 750.50) to revise the penalties for harming animals and allow for consecutive sentencing.  Both bills would exempt veterinarians and veterinarian technicians from the prohibitions and penalties when lawfully engaging in the practice of veterinarian medicine. Under the new law, a court could order a term of imprisonment imposed for a violation prohibited under the bills to be served consecutively to a term of imprisonment imposed for any other crime including any other violation of law arising out of the same transaction. 

MI - Cruelty, neglect - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. MCL 750.50 This statute sets out the Michigan duty of care for all vertebrate animals, including what constitutes sufficient food, water, shelter, sanitary conditions, exercise, and veterinary medical attention in order to maintain an animal in a state of good health. Also explained are the penalty and forfeiture provisions for violations of the statute. The exclusions under the statute include those animals used in hunting, fishing, trapping, horse racing, farming, pest control, zoos, lawful killing under the Animal Industry Act, and scientific research. In 2019, the penalty provisions were revised. A first violation with one animal is a 93 day/$1,000 misdemeanor. If the violation involves two or three animals or the death of any animal, the penalty increases to a 1-year/$2,000 misdemeanor. If the violation involved 4 or more animals but fewer than 10 animals or the person had one prior conviction, it becomes a 2-year/$2,000 felony. If the violation involved 10 or more animals but fewer than 25 animals or the person had two prior convictions, it becomes a 4-year/$5,000 felony. If the violation involved 25 or more animals or the person has had 3 or more prior convictions, it becomes a 7-year/$10,000 felony. Finally, if the person is an operator of a pet shop and he or she has had 5 or more prior convictions, it is a 2-year/$5,000 felony.
MI - Enforcement - Chapters 760 to 777 Code of Criminal Procedure. M. C. L. A. 764.16 This law authorizes private citizens to make arrests.
MI - Forfeiture - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code M.C.L.A. 750.53 This statute provides that a person violating any of the animal cruelty statutes may be arrested without warrant, similar to the arrest of those found disturbing the peace.  Further, the official making the arrest has a duty to seize the animals involved and place them in the custody of the jurisdiction.
MI - Poisonous Substances - § 750.437 Exposing poisonous substances where liable to be eaten by beasts M.C.L.A. 750.437 This Michigan statute makes a person liable and guilty of a misdemeanor if any animal on the person's property is exposed to or consumes a known poisonous substance. The statute makes an exception for poisons that are mixed only with vegetables or poisons for the destruction of predatory or dangerous prowling animals.
MI - Service Animal - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M.C.L.A. 750.50a This statute makes it a misdemeanor to (1) willfully and maliciously assault, beat, harass, injure, or attempt to assault, beat, harass, or injure a service animal that he or she knows or has reason to believe is a service animal used by a person with a disability; or (2) willfully and maliciously impede or interfere with, or attempt to impede or interfere with, duties performed by a service animal that he or she knows or has reason to believe is a service animal used by a person with a disability. Violation is a misdemeanor punishable by imprisonment for not more than 90 days or a fine of not more than $500.00, or both.
MI - Service Animal - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M.C.L.A. 750.50c This statute outlines the penalty for the intentional physical harm or interference with a police dog or horse. The statute provides for a misdemeanor in the case of interference to the animal and a five-year felony where the animal was killed or seriously physically injured. If the interference was committed during the commission of another felony, then the penalty rises to a potential two-year imprisonment.
Michigan Compiled Laws 1838: Chapter 8: Section 22 Mich. Rev. Stat. ch. 8, § 22 (1838) The Michigan law concerning the treatment of animals from 1838. The law states the punishment for the crime, and factors for determining if the crime has occurred.
Michigan Compiled Laws 1929: Chapter 285: Section 1 Mich. Comp. Laws ch. 285, § 1 (1929) Chapter 285, entitled "An act for the more effectual prevention of cruelty to animals," concerns Michigan's Law about the treatment of animals from 1929. The act covers what qualifies as cruelty to animals and what is the punishment for crime of cruelty to animals.
Minnesota 1860-1872 Public Laws: OFFENSES AGAINST CHASTITY, MORALITY, ETC. Minn. Stat. ch. 96 § 18 (1858) Section 18 of Chapter 96 from Minnesota Public Statutes 1860-1872 covers the treatment of animals.  Specifically, the statute covers the punishment for cruelty to animals.
Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians. 3-4-9- Cruelty to Animals. Title III, Section 3-4-9 Under Mississippi Band of Choctaw Indians code, cruelty to animals is a Class B offense. Any person who shall kill, torture, mistreat, mutilate, injure or abandon any animal shall be guilty of an offense under this section.
MN - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes M. S. A. § 343.01 - 40; 609.294; 609.596 - 597 These Minnesota statute comprise the anti-cruelty laws in the state. This section first allows the formation of private prevention of cruelty to animals societies and humane societies and sets forth their obligations by law. "Animal" is defined by this section as every living creature except members of the human race. No person shall overdrive, overload, torture, cruelly beat, neglect, or unjustifiably injure, maim, mutilate, or kill any animal, or cruelly work any animal when it is unfit for labor. Under the neglect component, the statute states that no person shall deprive any animal over which the person has charge or control of necessary food, water, or shelter, among other things.
MN - Vehicle - M.S.A. § 97B.091. Use of motor vehicles to chase wild animals prohibited M. S. A. § 97B.091 This Minnesota states that a person may not use a motor vehicle to intentionally drive, chase, run over, kill, or take a wild animal.
MO - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes V. A. M. S. 578.005 - 188; 566.111 These Missouri statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty laws. The term "animal" means every living vertebrate except a human being. The provisions of sections 578.005 to 578.023 do not apply to the care or treatment performed by a licensed veterinarian, bona fide scientific experiments, hunting, fishing, or trapping, publicly funded zoological parks, rodeo practices, and several other listed activities as described in 578.007. A person is guilty of animal neglect when he or she has custody or ownership or an animal and fails to provide adequate care, or when that person knowingly abandons an animal in any place without making provisions for its adequate care. Animal neglect and abandonment is a class C misdemeanor upon first conviction with enhancement to a class B misdemeanor for subsequent convictions. A person is guilty of animal abuse when a person intentionally or purposely kills an animal in any manner not allowed by law, purposely or intentionally causes injury or suffering to an animal, or, having ownership or custody of an animal, knowingly fails to provide adequate care or control which results in substantial harm to the animal. Animal abuse is a class A misdemeanor unless the defendant has previously been found guilty of animal abuse or the suffering involved is the result of torture or mutilation consciously inflicted while the animal was alive, in which case it is a class E felony.
MS - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes Miss. Code Ann. § 97-41-1 - 23; Miss. Code Ann. § 97-29-59; Miss. Code Ann. § 43-21-612 This section constitutes Mississippi's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions, which were recently amended in 2011. The pertinent anti-cruelty law, Sec. 97-41-1, states that any person who intentionally or with criminal negligence overrides, overdrives, overloads, tortures, torments, unjustifiably injures, deprives of necessary sustenance, food, or drink, cruelly beats, or needlessly mutilates any living creature is guilty of a misdemeanor. The cat and dog cruelty provision, 97-41-16, was significantly amended in 2011. This section, known as the "Mississippi Dog and Cat Pet Protection Law of 2011," makes it a misdemeanor to intentionally or with criminal negligence wound, deprive of adequate food, water, or shelter, or carry or confine in a cruel manner, any domesticated cat or dog. Aggravated cruelty occurs when a person with malice intentionally tortures, mutilates, maims, burns, starves or disfigures any domesticated dog or cat.
MT - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes MCA 45-8-209 - 211; 45-8- 217; 45-8-218; 7-23-4104 This section comprises Montana's anti-cruelty and dogfighting laws. A person commits the offense of cruelty to animals if he or she knowingly or negligently subjects an animal to mistreatment or neglect; fails to provide an animal in the person's custody with food and water of sufficient quantity or minimum protection for the animal from adverse weather conditions; or, in cases of immediate, obvious, serious illness or injury, fails to provide licensed veterinary or other appropriate medical care. Animal abandonment of a "helpless animal" or abandoning any animal on any highway, railroad, or in any other place where it may suffer is also considered cruelty. A first conviction results in a possible $1,000/1 year imprisonment with graduating penalty enhancements for subsequent convictions. This section does not prohibit a person humanely destroying an animal for just cause or the use of commonly accepted agricultural and livestock practices on livestock (among other things). Section 217 defines aggravated cruelty as either knowingly or purposely killing or inflicting cruelty to an animal with the purpose of terrifying, torturing, or mutilating the animal, or inflicting cruelty to animals on a collection, kennel, or herd of 10 or more animals.
Myanmar - Animal Welfare - Animal Health and Development Law The State Law and Order Restoration Council Law No. 13/93 This Myanmar Law, in English and Burmese, provides for livestock breeding, welfare, animal feed standards, the prevention and control of contagious diseases, inspections, trade, certificates and related fees, and the prevention of cruelty to animals.
NC - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Laws (Article 47) N.C.G.S.A.§ 14-360 to 14-369; § 19A-1 - 70; § 114-8.7; § 160A-182, § 14-177; § 153A-127 This section comprises the relevant North Carolina animal cruelty statutes. The anti-cruelty statute provides that if any person shall maliciously kill, or cause or procure to be killed, any animal by intentional deprivation of necessary sustenance, that person shall be guilty of a Class H felony. If any person shall maliciously torture, mutilate, maim, cruelly beat, disfigure, poison, or kill, or cause or procure to be tortured, mutilated, maimed, cruelly beaten, disfigured, poisoned, or killed any animal, every such offender shall for every such offense be guilty of a Class H felony. This section also makes promoting or conducting a cock fight a misdemeanor and promoting or conducting a dogfight a felony. Other prohibited acts include abandoning an animal, conveying any animal in a cruel manner, and restraining a dog in a cruel manner. This section also includes the civil remedy provisions.
ND - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Laws (Chapter 36-21.1) NDCC 36-21.1-01 to 15; § 36–21.2–01 to 15; § 12.1-20-02, 12.1-20-12 This North Dakota section comprises the state's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions.
ND - Initiatives - Prevention of Animal Cruelty Initiative, Measure 5 Initiative, Measure 5 (2012) This initiated statutory measure would create section 36-21.1-02.1 of the North Dakota Century Code. This measure would make it a class C felony for an individual to maliciously and intentionally harm a living dog, cat or horse and provide a court with certain sentencing options. The measure would not apply to production agriculture, or to lawful activities of hunters and trappers, licensed veterinarians, scientific researchers, or to individuals engaged in lawful defense of life or property. It failed at the polls in 2012 (34.6% yes).
NE - Cruelty - Article 9. Livestock Animal Welfare Act Neb. Rev. St. § 54-901 - 913 In 2010, Nebraska enacted the Livestock Animal Welfare Act. The act makes the intentional abandonment, neglect, or cruel mistreatment of livestock (bovine, equine, swine, sheep, goats, domesticated cervine animals, ratite birds, or poultry) a Class I misdemeanor (Class IV felony for subsequent offenses). Further, the act criminalizes "indecency with a livestock animal," which is a Class III misdemeanor. A person who is convicted of a Class IV felony under 54-903 (the abandonment/cruel neglect or mistreatment provision) shall also be ordered by the sentencing court not to possess a livestock animal for at least 5 years after the date of conviction.
NE - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Laws (Article 10) Neb. Rev. St. § 28-1001 - 1020 This Nebraska statutory section comprises the state's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions. The cruelty provision provides that a person who abandons or cruelly neglects an animal is guilty of a Class I misdemeanor. Intentional animal cruelty results in a Class I misdemeanor for the first offense and a Class IV felony for any subsequent offense, unless such cruel mistreatment involves the knowing and intentional torture, repeated beating, or mutilation of the animal where such an act automatically results in a Class IV felony. Animal means any vertebrate member of the animal kingdom, but does not include an uncaptured wild creature (which appears to exclude otherwise heinous, intentional acts to wildlife).
Nebraska Complied Laws 1887: Chapter X: Offenses Related to Domestic Animals Neb. Stat. ch. 10 §§ 63-82 Nebraska Compiled Statutes from 1887. The statutes cover cruelty to animals from transportation to negligence in handling.  Also covered is the stealing or interfering with various types of domestic animals.
New Hampshire General Laws 1878: Trespasses, Malicious Acts, etc. 1878 N.H. Laws 281 The New Hampshire session laws from 1878, chapter 281, covers the state's cruelty to animals laws. Specifically, the law covers cruelty to animals and the treatment of animals during transportation.
New Hampshire Revised Statutes 1843: Offences Against Chastity, Decency and Morality N.H. Rev. Stat. ch. 219 § 12 (1843) Section 12 of Chapter 219 from New Hampshire Revised Statutes of 1843 covers cruelty to animals. Specifically, the statutes states what qualifies as cruelty to animals and the punishment for it.
New Jersey Revision of Statutes 1709-1877: Chapter XII Supplement: An act for the prevention of cruelty to animals. N.J. Rev. Stat. 64-82 (1873) A supplement to the New Jersey Revision of Statutes for 1877. The supplement covered standing for officer's of New Jersey Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. In addition, the supplement addresses the question of jurisdiction for the enforcement the anti-cruelty laws.
New Jersey Revision of Statutes 1709-1877: Chapter XII: An act for the prevention of cruelty to animals. N.J. Rev. Stat. §§ 64-82 (1873) A compilation of the New Jersey anti-cruelty laws as of 1877. The laws covered include treatment of animals, penalties, and exceptions for scientific experiments.
New York Consolidated Laws 1909: Sections 180-196 N.Y. Penal Law §§ 180-196 (Consol. 1909) Article 16, entitled "Animals," concerns New York's Law about the treatment of animals from 1909. The act covers such topics as the keeping of animals for fighting to abandoning diseased or injured animals. In addition, the act provides definitions in section 180 for important words such as animal and torture.
New York Consolidated Laws 1938: Sections 180-196 N.Y. Penal Law §§ 180-196 (Consol. 1938) Article 16, entitled "Animals", concerns New York's Law about the treatment of animals from 1938. The act covers such topics as poisoning of animals to abandoning diseased or injured animals. In addition, the act provides definitions in section 180.
New York Penal Law 1866: Chapter 682: Section 2 N.Y. Rev. Stat. 682.2 (1866) Chapter 682 from New York Penal Law of 1866 covers cruelty to animals. Section 2 from this chapter describes the offense entitled neglect of disabled animals. The law states the penalty for leaving a disabled or diseased animal to die on any state or city land.
New York Revised Statute 1881: Chapter 682: Section 26 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 682, § 26 (1881) Section 26 of Chapter 682 from New York Revised Statutes 1881 concerns the treatment of animals by the owner or any other person. A person found harming such an animal would be guilty of a misdemeanor.
New York Revised Statutes 1829: Title 6: Section 26 N.Y. Rev. stat. tit. 6, 26 (1829) The law contained in Title 6, Section 26 of the New York Revised Statutes of 1829 concerns the offense of maliciously killing an animal of another. The statute describes the type of animals covered and the punishment for killing, wounding, or maiming such an animal. In addition, the statute also states the punishment for the offense of cruelty to animals.
New York Revised Statutes 1866: Chapter 783: Sections 1-10 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 783, §§ 1-10 (1866) Chapter 783, entitled "An act for the more effectual prevention of animal cruelty," concerns New York's Law on animal treatment for 1866.
New York Revised Statutes 1867: Chapter 375: Sections 1-10 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 375, §§ 1-10 (1867) Chapter 375, entitled "An act for the more effectual prevention of animal cruelty," concerns New York's law on animal treatment for 1867.
New York Revised Statutes 1874: Chapter 12: Sections 1-8 N.Y. Rev. Stat. ch. 12, §§ 1-8 (1874) Chapter 12, entitled "An act relating to animals," concerns New York's Law about the treatment of animals from 1874.
NH - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Laws N.H. Rev. Stat. § 644:8 - 644:8-g; N.H. Rev. Stat. § 437-B:1 These New Hampshire statutes provide the animals anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions for the state. Included are general anti-cruelty laws for any animal (including domestic and wild animals), exhibitions of fighting animals, provisions for protection of animals riding in motor vehicles, restrictions related to docking the tail of a horse, provisions for the use of animals in science classes or fairs, laws against maiming or willfully interfering with police dogs or horses, laws related to the willful interference with organizations or projects involving animals, and provisions related to dogs riding in pick-up trucks.
NJ - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes NJSA 4:22-10 to 4:22-61; NJSA 2C:33-31 - 32 These New Jersey statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty provisions. According to the definitional section, "animal" or "creature" includes the whole brute creation. Exclusions under the act include state regulated scientific experiments, state sanctioned killing of animals, hunting of game, training of dogs, normal livestock operations, and the killing of rats and mice. With regard to livestock practices, no person may be cited or arrested for a first offense involving a minor or incidental violation of any provision of this title involving alleged cruelty to domestic livestock unless that person has first been issued a written warning.
NM - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes NMSA 1978, § 30-18-1 to 30-18-16; NMSA 1978, § 77-18-2 to 4 This section comprises the New Mexico anti-animal cruelty provisions. As used in this section, "animal" does not include insects or reptiles. Cruelty to animals occurs when a person mistreats, injures, kills without lawful justification or torments an animal or abandons or fails to provide necessary sustenance to an animal under that person's custody or control. Extreme cruelty to animals, a fourth-degree felony, consists of a person intentionally or maliciously torturing, mutilating, injuring or poisoning an animal or maliciously killing an animal. Upon conviction, the court may order a person to participate in an animal cruelty prevention program or an animal cruelty education program, or to obtain psychological counseling for treatment of a mental health disorder.
NM - Impound - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. NMSA 1978, § 77-1-17 This New Mexico statute provides that the owner or operator of a veterinary clinic or hospital, a doctor of veterinary medicine, a kennel, grooming parlor or other animal care facility is not liable for disposing of abandoned animals after proper notice has been sent to the owner of record.
NM - Property - Chapter 77. Animals and Livestock. NMSA 1978, § 77-1-1 Dogs, cats and domestic birds are considered personal property in New Mexico.
Northern Ireland - Animal Welfare - Welfare of Animals Act (Northern Ireland) 2011 2011 CHAPTER 16 An Act establishing penalties for engaging in certain activities that are considered detrimental to animal welfare in Northern Ireland. Activities that constitute offences include: causing an animal unnecessary suffering, mutilating an animal’s body, docking a dog’s tail (with certain limited exceptions), administering a poisonous or injurious substance to an animal, and engaging in or attending an animal fight. Activities lawfully done under the Animals (Scientific Procedures) Act 1986, and the normal course of fishing, hunting and (hare) coursing are exempt from the 2011 Act. Hare coursing events have since been banned in separate legislation.
NV - Bestiality - 201.455. Bestiality; penalties N.R.S. 201.455 This Nevada law, enacted in 2017, prohibits bestiality. Convicted violators face the relinquishing and permanently forfeiting ownership or possession of all animals which are in the same household as the person to an animal shelter, an organization that takes into custody animals which have been abused or neglected, or a society for the prevention of cruelty to animals. The court may also impose a possession ban on owning or keeping any animal for a period determined by the court. Those convicted must undergo a psychological evaluation and any recommended counseling and must pay all reasonable costs incurred for the care and maintenance of the animal involved in the crime and any other animal relinquished by the person. If the person convicted of the crime of bestiality is not the owner of the animal involved in the crime, reimbursing the owner of the animal for all medical expenses incurred for treating the animal.

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