Statutes

Statute by categorysort descending Citation Summary
MN - Hunting - Chapter 97A. Game and Fish. General Provisions. M. S. A. § 97A.037 This law reflects Minnesota's hunter harassment provision. This law prohibits the intentional interference with the taking of wild animals. A person is also prohibited from disturbing wild animals to prevent or disrupt their lawful taking. Further, a person who has the intent to violate this law may not enter or remain on public lands or private land without permission of the owner. A person must obey the order of a peace officer to stop the harassing conduct that violates this section if the officer observes the conduct. Violation of this subdivision is a misdemeanor.
MN - Hunting - Chapter 97A. Game and Fish. General Provisions. M. S. A. § 97A.105 In Minnesota, there are license requirements for breeding fur-bearing animals, game birds, bear, and mute swans. Fox and mink may not be bought or sold for breeding unless they have been pen-bred for at least two generations. Live beaver may not be transported without a permit. A violation may result in all animals being confiscated. It is not necessary to have a license to purchase live game birds or their eggs if the birds are released, consumed, or processed within one year.
MN - Hunting, Internet - § 97B.115. Computer-assisted remote hunting prohibition M.S.A. § 97B.115 This statute prohibits computer-assisted remote hunting within the state of Minnesota. The statute also prohibits the operation or selling of any computer software or service that allows a person to engage in computer-assisted hunting. A person who violates this section is guilty of a misdemeanor.
MN - Impound - Chapter 346. Animals M. S. A. § 346.47 This is Minnesota's holding period law. This law mandates that all animals seized by public authority must be held for redemption for at least 5 business days by the impounding agency or a longer time if specified by municipal ordinance. The law requires the establishments to preserve records of the animals in custody for at least six months. A person must not release an animal seized and held under this section for research or product testing, either directly or through an animal dealer.
MN - Initiatives - Amendment 2 (right to hunt) Amendment 2 (1998) This ballot measure asked whether the Minnesota Constitution should be amended to affirm that hunting and fishing and the taking of game and fish are a valued part of our heritage that shall be forever preserved for the people and shall be managed by law and regulation for the public good. The measure was passed in 1998 by 77.2% of voters.
MN - Ivory - 84.0896. Trade in prohibited animal parts prohibited M. S. A. § 84.0896 This Minnesota law, effective January 1, 2020, prohibits the sale of a "prohibited animal part." This is defined as a tooth or tusk from any species of elephant, hippopotamus, mammoth, mastodon, walrus, whale, or narwhal, or any piece thereof, whether raw or worked. Certain exceptions are written into the law including certain antiques (as defined), possession by a bona fide scientific or educational institution, and items expressly authorized under federal law.
MN - Lien, veterinay - Chapter 514. Liens Against Property. Agricultural Liens. M. S. A. § 514.965 - 966 These Minnesota statutes relate to agricultural liens on livestock. Under these sections, an “agricultural lien” includes a veterinarian's lien, breeder's lien, livestock production input lien, temporary livestock production input lien, and feeder's lien. In section 514.966 entitled, "Agricultural lien on livestock," a licensed veterinarian performing emergency veterinary services in the ordinary course of business that cost more than $25 for animals at the request of the owner or a person in possession of the animals has a lien on the animals for the value of the services. Additionally, a veterinarian's lien, breeder's lien, livestock production input lien, temporary livestock production lien, or feeder's lien attaches to the livestock serviced by the agricultural lienholder, and products and proceeds thereof to the extent of the price or value of the service provided. To perfect the lien, a financing statement must be filed within the time periods established in the law.
MN - Liens - § 514.93. Summary sale of unclaimed animal; notice; proceeds; record M. S. A. § 514.93 - .94 Under Minnesota statute, a veterinarian may lawfully sell an animal if it is left unclaimed with the veterinarian for ten or more days following a procedure that is provided by the veterinarian. Prior to sale, the veterinarian must provide notice to the owner of the animal. The veterinarian is also required to follow all necessary procedures before and after the sale of the animal that is listed in the statute.
MN - Meat - Chapter 31. Food. Meats, Generally M. S. A. § 31.60 - 31.65 This Minnesota chapter deals with sale and processing of meat in the state. Among the provisions include a prohibition on the sale of veal when calves are killed when less than four weeks old; the sale of horse meat for human consumption unless conspicuous notices are provided; and the sale of unwholesome game or poultry. The chapter also creates a Meat Industry Division in the Department of Agriculture who enforces and administers these laws.
MN - Ordinances - 366.01.Chapter 366. Town Board; Board of Audit. Town Board. M. S. A. § 366.01 This Minnesota statute provides that the supervisors of each town constituting a town board are empowered to license and regulate the presence or keeping of dogs or domestic animal pets when deemed to be in the public interest.
MN - Ordinances - Chapter 347. Dogs and Cats. Dogs. M. S. A. § 347.21 This Minnesota statute provides that state dog control laws are supplemental to local provisions enacted by ordinance and shall not be construed as to modify, repeal, or prevent municipalities from prohibiting, licensing, or regulating the running at large of dogs.
MN - Ordinances - Chapter 365. Town General Law. Town Meeting Powers. M. S. A. § 365.10 Under this Minnesota statute, town electors at their annual town meeting, are empowered to exercise control over a number of activities relating to dogs. They can decide the locations of pounds, set the number of poundmasters, and discontinue a pound. The electors may make orders and bylaws on restraining horses, cattle, sheep, swine, and other domestic animals from going at large on roads. They may also make orders and bylaws on the impounding of domestic animals going at large and fix penalties for violations of the orders and bylaws. The electors may let the town board pass an ordinance for licensing dogs and cats and regulating their presence, keeping, and running at large in the town. The electors are also granted the authority to provide for a specific activity that is within any of the following categories: the promotion of health, safety, order, and convenience, and the general welfare.
MN - Rabies - Chapter 35. Animal Health M. S. A. § 35.67 - 35.69 This set of Minnesota laws relates to rabies investigation and proclamation. The owner or custodian of a dog may not permit it to be at large, either on the premises of the owner or elsewhere, within any city or town covered by a proclamation made under section 35.68, during the time the proclamation is in force, unless the dog is effectively muzzled so that it cannot bite any other animal or person. Sec. 35.69 also allows any person to kill a dog found running at large contrary to a rabies proclamation.
MN - Research animals - 135A.191. Research dogs and cats M.S.A. § 135A.191 This Minnesota law states that a publicly-funded higher education facility that confines dogs or cats for science, education, or research purposes and plans on euthanizing a dog or cat for other than science, education, or research purposes must first offer the dog or cat to an animal rescue organization.
MN - Restaurants - 157.175. Dogs; outdoor food and beverage service establishments M. S. A. § 157.175 This Minnesota law allows a statutory or home rule charter city to adopt an ordinance permitting food and beverage service establishments to allow dogs to accompany persons patronizing designated outdoor areas. The law describes the permitting process that establishments must first undergo. At a minimum, the ordinance must include the following five requirements, which must be posted conspicuously on a sign at the premises: (1) employees must be prohibited from touching, petting, or otherwise handling dogs; (2) employees and patrons must not allow dogs to come into contact with serving dishes, utensils, tableware, linens, paper products, or any other items involved in food service operations; (3) patrons must keep their dogs on a leash at all times and must keep their dogs under reasonable control; (4) dogs must not be allowed on chairs, tables, or other furnishings; and (5) dog waste must be cleaned immediately and the area sanitized.
MN - Trust - 501C.0408. Trust for care of animal M.S.A. § 501C.0408 This Minnesota law enacted in 2016 allows for the creation of a pet trust. A trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal. Interestingly, the trust may not be enforced for more than 90 years.
MN - Vehicle - M.S.A. § 97B.091. Use of motor vehicles to chase wild animals prohibited M. S. A. § 97B.091 This Minnesota states that a person may not use a motor vehicle to intentionally drive, chase, run over, kill, or take a wild animal.
MN - Veterinary - Chapter 156. Veterinarians. Board of Veterinary Medicine. M.S.A. § 156.001 - 20 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
MN - Wildlife, possession - Chapter 97A. Game and Fish. Possession and Transportation of Wild Animals. M. S. A. § 97A.501 - 56 These Minnesota statutes restrict possession and transportation of wild animals. No one may transport wild animals taken, bought, or sold in violation of the game and fish laws. In general, a person may not take, import, transport, or sell an endangered species of wild animal, but there are exceptions.
MN - Wolves - 97B.645. Gray wolves, Gray wolf management plan M.S.A. § 97B.645 - 97B.648 These Minnesota statutes deal with hunting and management of gray wolves. The gray wolf management plan is meant to ensure the long-term survival of the gray wolf in Minnesota, to reduce conflicts between gray wolves and humans, to minimize depredation of livestock and domestic pets, and to manage the ecological impact of wolves on prey species and other predators. If a gray wolf is posing an immediate threat to livestock or a domestic animal, it may be permissible to kill the wolf. Under 97B-647, a person may not take a wolf without a wolf hunting or wolf trapping license. In 2014, these statutes were amended to make a person who unlawfully takes, transports, or possesses a wolf in violation of the game and fish laws, and has one or more prior convictions involving the taking of wolves, is liable for a civil penalty equal to the restitution value for the wolf; the statutes also require the Commissioner of Natural Resources to compile a list that is updated quarterly on known wolf deaths, based on reporting by conservation officers. The list must specify the date and location of each wolf death and must be available on the department Web site.
MO - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws V. A. M. S. 209.150; 209.152, 209.160, 209.162, 209.190, 209.200, 209.202, 209.204; 304.080; 387.426 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
MO - Breeding - Proposition B 2010 Proposition B

The official ballot title asks voters if Missouri law be amended to (1) require large-scale dog breeding operations to provide each dog under their care with sufficient food, clean water, housing and space; necessary veterinary care; regular exercise and adequate rest between breeding cycles; (2) prohibit any breeder from having more than 50 breeding dogs for the purpose of selling their puppies as pets; and (3) create a misdemeanor crime of “puppy mill cruelty” for any violations.

MO - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes V. A. M. S. 578.005 - 188; 566.111 These Missouri statutes comprise the state's anti-cruelty laws. The term "animal" means every living vertebrate except a human being. The provisions of sections 578.005 to 578.023 do not apply to the care or treatment performed by a licensed veterinarian, bona fide scientific experiments, hunting, fishing, or trapping, publicly funded zoological parks, rodeo practices, and several other listed activities as described in 578.007. A person is guilty of animal neglect when he or she has custody or ownership or an animal and fails to provide adequate care, or when that person knowingly abandons an animal in any place without making provisions for its adequate care. Animal neglect and abandonment is a class C misdemeanor upon first conviction with enhancement to a class B misdemeanor for subsequent convictions. A person is guilty of animal abuse when a person intentionally or purposely kills an animal in any manner not allowed by law, purposely or intentionally causes injury or suffering to an animal, or, having ownership or custody of an animal, knowingly fails to provide adequate care or control which results in substantial harm to the animal. Animal abuse is a class A misdemeanor unless the defendant has previously been found guilty of animal abuse or the suffering involved is the result of torture or mutilation consciously inflicted while the animal was alive, in which case it is a class E felony.
MO - Dog Ordinances - Chapter 77. Third Class Cities. V.A.M.S. 77.510 This Missouri statute provides that a city council may tax, restrain and prohibit the running at large of dogs, and provide for their destruction when at large contrary to ordinance, and impose penalties on the owners or keepers thereof.
MO - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws V.A.M.S. 253.185; 270.010; 272.050; 273.010 - 405; 77.510; 80.090; 322.010 - 080; 10.112 - 113 These Missouri statutes comprise the state's dog laws. Among the provisions include laws for impounding loose dogs, licensing, rabies control, and the Animal Care Facilities Act, which regulates commercial breeders/pet shops.
MO - Domestic violence - 455.045. Temporary relief available--ex parte orders V. A. M. S. 455.010, 455.045 Missouri amended its laws on domestic violence protection orders in 2021 to include the protection of pets. Any ex parte order of protection shall be to protect the petitioner from domestic violence, stalking, or sexual assault and may include "[a] temporary order of possession of pets where appropriate." “Pet” is defined as a living creature maintained by a household member for companionship and not for commercial purposes.
MO - Ecoterrorism - Chapter 578. Miscellaneous Offenses. Animal Research and Production Facilities V. A. M. S. 578.405 - 578.412 This chapter comprises "The Animal Research and Production Facilities Protection Act." The act prohibits anyone from releasing, stealing, or otherwise intentionally causing the death, injury, or loss of any animal at or from an animal facility. It also prohibits any person from damaging, vandalizing, or stealing any property in or on an animal facility, or obtaining access to an animal facility by false pretenses for the purpose of performing acts not authorized by the facility. Generally, violation is a misdemeanor if the loss is less than $300 and a felony if it exceeds that amount. Any person who has been damaged by a violation of section 578.407 may recover all actual and consequential damages, punitive damages, and court costs, including reasonable attorneys' fees, from the person causing such damage.
MO - Endangered Species - Chapter 252. Department of Conservation--Fish and Game. V.A.M.S. 252.020, 252.235, 252.240 This Missouri statute provides that the importation, transportation, or sale of any endangered species of fish or wildlife, or hides or other parts thereof, or the sale or possession with intent to sell any article made in whole or in part from the skin, hide or other parts of any endangered species of fish or wildlife is prohibited. Violation of the statute constitutes a Class B misdemeanor.
MO - Equine Activity Liability - 537.325. Definitions--liability for equine or livestock V. A. M. S. 537.325 This Missouri statute provides that an equine activity sponsor, an equine professional or any other person shall not be liable for an injury to or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of equine activities and no participant shall make maintain an action against an equine operator. Statutory definitions are provided, including "participant," "inherent risk," and who is considered an "equine sponsor" or "equine professional." The term "engages in an equine activity" does not include being a spectator at an equine activity, except in cases where the spectator places him or herself in an unauthorized area. The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law.
MO - Exotic - Chapter 578. Miscellaneous Offenses. Large Carnivores V.A.M.S. 578.600 - 578.625 The “Large Carnivore Act” pertains to large cats and bears that are nonnative to Missouri and held in captivity. The Act prohibits ownership, possession, breeding, and transportation of large carnivores (with exceptions). The Act creates civil and criminal liability for persons who own or possess a large carnivore. Violations may result in misdemeanor or felony convictions, community service work, the loss of privileges to own or possess any animal, and forfeiture of a large carnivore.
MO - Exotic pet - 578.023. Keeping a dangerous wild animal, penalty V. A. M. S. 578.023 This Missouri law states that no person may keep any lion, tiger, leopard, ocelot, jaguar, cheetah, margay, mountain lion, Canada lynx, bobcat, jaguarundi, hyena, wolf, bear, nonhuman primate, coyote, any deadly, dangerous, or poisonous reptile, or any deadly or dangerous reptile over eight feet long, in any place other than a properly maintained zoological park, circus, scientific, or educational institution, research laboratory, veterinary hospital, or animal refuge, unless such person has registered such animals with the local law enforcement agency in the county in which the animal is kept. Violation is a class C misdemeanor.
MO - Fish and Game - Chapter 252 (The Wildlife and Forestry Law) V.A.M.S. 252.002 - 252.333

This chapter establishes the Missouri Department of Conservation, outlines the agency's scope of authority, and includes all of the state's wildlife and endangered species statutes.

MO - Hunting - Chapter 537. Torts and Actions for Damages. V. A. M. S. 578.151 - 153; V. A. M. S. 537.524 This Missouri law reflects the state's hunter harassment provision. Under the law, any person who intentionally interferes with the lawful taking of wildlife by another is guilty of the crime of interference with lawful hunting, fishing or trapping in the first degree. Violation is a class A misdemeanor. Additionally, any person who enters or remains in a hunting, fishing or trapping area where lawful hunting, fishing or trapping may occur with the intent to interfere with the lawful taking of wildlife is guilty of the crime of interference with lawful hunting, fishing or trapping in the second degree. Violation of this section is a class B misdemeanor. A court may enjoin conduct which would be in violation of the hunting interference laws and damages, including punitive damages, may be awarded to person adversely affected.
MO - Impound - Chapter 273. Dogs--Cats. Local Option Dog Tax. V. A. M. S. 273.100 This Missouri statute provides that every city or town marshal of every incorporated city or town shall seize and impound all dogs found running at large without collars around their necks. These dogs will be kept for a period of one week after which they shall be put to death by humane methods. The statute further states that any marshal who shall fail or refuse to take up and impound any such dog shall be guilty of a misdemeanor and on conviction thereof fined not less than five dollars nor more than twenty-five dollars.
MO - Initiatives - Proposition A (felony animal fighting) Proposition A (1998)

This 1998 ballot proposal asked, "[s]hall a statute be enacted making it a class D felony to bait or fight animals; permit such activities on premises you control; or promote, conduct, stage, advertise or collect fees for such activities; and making it a class A misdemeanor to knowingly attend baiting or fighting of animals; knowingly sell, offer for sale, or transport animals for such purposes; own, possess, manufacture or deal in cockfighting implements; bear wrestle; permit bear wrestling on premises you control; promote, conduct, stage, advertise, or collect fees for bear wrestling; or market, possess, train, or surgically alter a bear for bear wrestling?" It was passed in 1998 by 62.6% of voters.

MO - Initiatives - Proposition B (dog breeders) Proposition B (2010)

This 2010 ballot measure asked whether Missouri law shall be amended to: require large-scale dog breeding operations to provide each dog under their care with sufficient food, clean water, housing and space; necessary veterinary care; regular exercise and adequate rest between breeding cycles; prohibit any breeder from having more than 50 breeding dogs for the purpose of selling their puppies as pets; and create a misdemeanor crime of puppy mill cruelty” for any violations. It was passed in 2010 by 51.6% of voters.

MO - Lien, care and board - Chapter 430. Liens for Keeping, Training and Breeding Animals V. A. M. S. 430.150 - 220 This chapter of Missouri laws concerns liens for the keeping, training, and breeding of animals. Section 430.150 states that every person who keeps, boards or trains any horse, mule or other animal has a lien on such animal, and on any vehicle, harness or equipment that came with the animal, for the amount due. No owner or claimant has the right to take any such property out of the custody of the person having such lien, except with the lienholder's consent or on the payment of such debt. Section 430.160 outlines the procedure for enforcement of the lien, which includes where to file a claim and the notice requirements.
MO - Lost Dog - Uniform Disposition of Unclaimed Property Act V. A. M. S. 447.010 - 110 This section comprises Missouri's Uniform Disposition of Unclaimed Property Act.
MO - Ordinances - Chapter 77. Third Class Cities V. A. M. S. 77.590, 79.110, 80.090, 82.300 This set of statutes authorizes municipal governments to regulate animals and animal-related nuisances.
MO - Ordinances - Chapter 79. Fourth Class Cities. Police and Health Regulations V. A. M. S. 79.400 This Missouri statute provides that a local board of aldermen may tax, regulate and restrain and prohibit the running at large of dogs, and provide for their destruction when at large contrary to ordinance, and impose penalties on the owners or keepers thereof.
MO - Pet Shop - Animal Care and Facilities Licensing and Regulation (Chapter 273) V.A.M.S. 273.325 - 359 Under these Missouri statutes, a license is required to operate animal boarding facilities, pet shops, pounds, dealers and commercial breeders. The canine cruelty prevention act makes it the crime of canine cruelty if the person poses a substantial risk to the health and welfare of animals in the person's custody. A violation is a misdemeanor.
MO - Rabies - Chapter 322. Protection Against Rabies V. A. M. S. 322.090 - 322.145 This chapter concerns laws preventing the transmission and control of rabies and other zoonotic diseases. Section 322.140 provides that if a county does not adopt rules and regulations pursuant to sections 322.090 to 322.130, whenever an animal bites or otherwise possibly transmits rabies or any zoonotic disease, the incident shall be immediately reported to the county health department. It also provides that the owner of an owner that bites is responsible for the costs associated with rabies testing and/or treatment. Further, the owner of an animal that bites or otherwise possibly transmitted rabies or any zoonotic disease shall be liable to an injured party for all damages done by the animal.
MO - Trust - Creation of trust, care of living animals V.A.M.S. 456.4-408 This Missouri statute represents the state's pet trust law. The law provides that a trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.
MO - Veterinary - Chapter 340. Veterinarians. V. A. M. S. 340.010 - 405 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
MO - Wildlife - Chapter 252. Department of Conservation--Fish and Game. V. A. M. S. 252.040 No wildlife shall be pursued, taken, killed, possessed or disposed of except in the manner, to the extent and at the time or times permitted by such rules and regulations; and any pursuit, taking, killing, possession or disposition thereof, except as permitted by such rules and regulations, are hereby prohibited. Any person violating this section shall be guilty of a misdemeanor except that any person violating any of the rules and regulations pertaining to record keeping requirements imposed on licensed fur buyers and fur dealers shall be guilty of an infraction and shall be fined not less than ten dollars nor more than one hundred dollars. At least one case has held this statute to be applicable to dogs chasing deer.
Model National Animal Welfare Act model law

This model law was drafted to provide a starting point for the drafting of national animal welfare law.  It includes sections related to companion animals, animal cruelty, owner responsibilities, animal experimentation, and food animal provisions, among others.

Model National Animal Welfare Act - Spanish

This is the spanish translation of the Model National Legislation.

MS - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws Miss. Code Ann. § 43-6-151 - 155; § 43-6-1 - 15; § 97-41-21, 23; § 63-3-1111; § 77-8-31 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
MS - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes Miss. Code Ann. § 97-41-1 - 23; Miss. Code Ann. § 97-29-59 This section constitutes Mississippi's anti-cruelty and animal fighting provisions, which were recently amended in 2011. The pertinent anti-cruelty law, Sec. 97-41-1, states that any person who intentionally or with criminal negligence overrides, overdrives, overloads, tortures, torments, unjustifiably injures, deprives of necessary sustenance, food, or drink, cruelly beats, or needlessly mutilates any living creature is guilty of a misdemeanor. The cat and dog cruelty provision, 97-41-16, was significantly amended in 2011. This section, known as the "Mississippi Dog and Cat Pet Protection Law of 2011," makes it a misdemeanor to intentionally or with criminal negligence wound, deprive of adequate food, water, or shelter, or carry or confine in a cruel manner, any domesticated cat or dog. Aggravated cruelty occurs when a person with malice intentionally tortures, mutilates, maims, burns, starves or disfigures any domesticated dog or cat.
MS - Dangerous Animal - Chapter 3. Crimes Against the Person. Miss. Code Ann. § 97-3-45 This Mississippi law makes an owner liable for manslaughter if he or she wilfully allows a mischievous animal to go at large, or it goes at large because the owner fails to exercise ordinary care, and the animal, while at large or not confined, kills any human being who took reasonable precautions to avoid the animal.

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