Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort descending Summary
OH - Emergency - 4765.52 Provision of emergency medical services to dog or cat R.C. § 4765.52 This Ohio statute specifies the emergency treatment that a medical technician or first responder could provide, prior to a dog or cat being transferred to a veterinarian for further treatment. The statute also highlights the immunities that medical responders, directors, and emergency medical service organizations have under the statute, unless they engage in an act or omission while providing medical services to a dog or cat, that constitutes willful or wanton misconduct. The statute also makes clear that a veterinarian who acts in good faith is not liable for any act or omission that occurred prior to the veterinarian providing services to the cat or dog.
OH - Trust - Chapter 5804. Creation, Validity, Modification and Termination of Trust R.C. § 5804.08 Ohio enacted its pet trust law in 2007. A trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal alive during the settlor's lifetime. The trust terminates upon the death of the animal or, if the trust was created to provide for the care of more than one animal alive during the settlor's lifetime, upon the death of the last surviving animal.
OH - Impound - Impounding Animals R.C. § 715.23 This Ohio statute empowers municipal corporations to regulate, restrain, or prohibit the running at large of cattle, horses, swine, sheep, goats, geese, chickens, or other fowl or animals (except as otherwise provided for dogs), impound and hold these animals, and authorize the sale of the animals for the penalty imposed.
OH - Livestock - Chapter 904. Livestock Care Standards R.C. § 904.01 - 904.09 These Ohio statutes establish the Ohio livestock care standards board and Ohio livestock care standards fund. The statutes make it illegal to falsify any plans, specifications, data, reports, records, or other information required to be kept or submitted to the director of agriculture or the board.
OH - Horse slaughter - Chapter 919. Horse Meat R.C. § 919.01 - 919.99 These Ohio statutes deal with horse slaughter and horse meat. Any person who has any establishment that processes and sells horse meat for human food must be licensed by the department of agriculture. The statutes also stipulate certain labeling, signage, and record-keeping requirements. A violation is a first degree misdemeanor.
OH - Exotic - Chapter 935. Dangerous Wild Animals and Restricted Snakes R.C. § 935.01 - .99 On June 5, 2012, Ohio governor Kasich signed the "Dangerous Wild Animal Act" into law. Under this new section, no person shall possess a dangerous wild animal on or after January 1, 2014 unless he or she is authorized under an unexpired wildlife shelter/propagation permit or other exception. Dangerous wild animals include big cats, some smaller exotic cats, bears, elephants, hyenas, gray wolves, alligators, crocodiles and nonhuman primates other than lemurs. Except as provided, no person shall acquire, buy, sell, trade, or transfer possession or ownership of a dangerous wild animal on or after the effective date of this section.
OH - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 945. Humane Slaughter of Livestock. R.C. § 945.01 - 99 These laws comprise Ohio's humane slaughter provisions. After July 1, 1967, no method of slaughtering livestock or handling in connection with the commercial slaughtering of livestock shall be utilized unless it is humane. Humane methods are defined as those that render animals insensible to pain by a single blow or gunshot or an electrical, chemical, or other means that is rapid and effective. Slaughter in accordance with the ritual requirements of the Jewish faith or any other religious faith that prescribes a method of slaughter whereby the animal suffers loss of consciousness by anemia of the brain is also allowed. Violation of the act results in a fine of not more than one hundred dollars.
OH - Assistance Animals - Consolidated Assistance Animal Laws R.C. § 955.011; R.C. § 955.43; R.C. § 2921.321; R.C. § 4511.47; §4925.06; R.C. § 5.241

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

OH - Ordinance - 955.221 County, township, and municipal corporation ordinances to control dogs R.C. § 955.221 This Ohio statute provides that a board of county commissioners, board of township trustees, or municipal corporation may adopt and enforce resolutions to control dogs that are not otherwise in conflict with any other provision of the Revised Code. These ordinances or resolutions to control dogs include, but are not limited to, ordinances or resolutions concerned with the ownership, keeping, or harboring of dogs, the restraint of dogs, dogs as public nuisances, and dogs as a threat to public health, safety, and welfare, except that such ordinances or resolutions shall not prohibit the use of any dog which is lawfully engaged in hunting or training for the purpose of hunting while accompanied by a licensed hunter.
OH - Breeder - Chapter 956. Dog Breeding Kennels; Dog Retailers. R.C. § 956.01 - 99 This section represents Ohio's commercial dog breeding laws. Under the chapter, a "high volume breeder" is defined as an establishment that keeps, houses, and maintains six or more breeding dogs and: (1) In return for a fee or other consideration, sells five or more adult dogs or puppies in any calendar year to dog brokers or pet stores; (2) In return for a fee or other consideration, sells forty or more puppies in any calendar year to the public; or (3) Keeps, houses, and maintains, at any given time in a calendar year, more than forty puppies that are under four months of age, that have been bred on the premises of the establishment, and that have been primarily kept, housed, and maintained from birth on the premises of the establishment. High volume breeders have additional duties under the law related to well-being of the dogs kept. The chapter also details requirements for licenses and/or registrations for high volume breeders, rescues, and dog brokers. Inspections are also outlined in the chapter, with high volume breeders having a requirement of at least one inspection annually. Penalties for violation of provisions, availability of injunctions, and revocation of licenses is also covered.
OH - Cruelty - Consolidated Cruelty Statutes R.C. § 959.01 - 959.99 These statutes comprise Ohio's anti-animal cruelty and animal fighting provisions. Included in the prohibited acts are abandoning domestic animals, willfully injuring or poisoning domestic or agricultural animals, drugging animals in competition, and "cruel" acts to both wild and domestic animals as defined by statute. The section also prohibits dogfighting and cockfighting.
OH - Cemeteries, Pet - Chapter 961. Pet Cemeteries R.C. § 961.01 - 99 This Ohio chapter concerns the establishment of "pet cemeteries." The owner of land used for a pet cemetery must file a declaration in the county recorder's office that the land is to be used only for such purposes. Unless the deed restriction is removed, no person shall use land restricted as provided in this section for any purpose other than for pet cemetery purposes. The pet cemetery must be at least three acres in size and the owner must comply with deposit requirements described under the "endowment care fund." Violation of the provisions relating to& the land use restriction (961.02), the size of the pet cemetery (961.03), or the endowment care fund requirement (961.04) results in a fine of up to $5,000 or imprisonment for up to one year, or both.
Canada - Alberta - Alberta Statutes. Animal Protection Act R.S.A. 2000, c. A-41, s. 1 This set of laws from Alberta, Canada comprises the Animal Protection Act. The Act states that no person shall permit or cause an animal to be in distress. Specifically, a person who owns or is in charge of an animal must ensure that the animal has adequate food and water, must provide the animal with adequate care when the animal is wounded or ill, and must provide the animal with reasonable protection from injurious heat or cold as well as adequate shelter, ventilation and space. A person who contravenes this Act is guilty of an offence and liable to a fine of not more than $20,000 in addition to restrictions on owning animals for a specified period of time. The Act also outlines the power of both peace officers to take animals in distress into their custody and humane societies to provide care for seized animals.
Canada - Alberta - Dangerous Dogs Act R.S.A. 2000, c. D-3, s. 1 This set of laws comprises the Alberta, Canada Dangerous Dog Act. Under the Act, a justice may take a complaint that a dog has bitten or attempted to bite a person, or that a dog is dangerous and not kept under proper control. In either circumstance, if it appears to the justice that the dog ought to be destroyed, the justice shall direct a peace officer to destroy it. Additionally, a person who fails to comply with an order under this section is guilty of an offence and liable to a fine of not more than $5 for each day during which the person fails to comply with the order.
Canada - British Columbia - Division 1 -- Regulation of Animals R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 323, s. 702.1 - 707.1(10)

This set of British Columbia, Canada laws addresses animal control. The provisions give the animal control board the authority to regulate loose animals and licensing of dogs.

Canada - British Columbia - Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 372, s. 1 - 26(4) This set of British Columbia, Canada laws establishes the guidelines for establishment of individual chapters of The British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. The laws allow these societies to relieve animals in "distress" as defined by law. A person who wilfully or knowingly interferes with or obstructs a person in the discharge of duties or the exercise of powers under this Act commits an offence punishable by a fine of not more than $2000 or to imprisonment for not more than 6 months, or to both.
Canada - Canada Federal Statutes. Criminal Code. Part VIII -- Offences Against the Person and Reputation. Criminal Negligence. R.S.C. 1985, c. C-46, s. 219 - 221

The statutory definition of criminal negligence involves doing any act or omitting to do a legal duty that shows ‘wanton or reckless disregard for the lives or safety of others.’ Use of the words ‘others’ suggests that only attacks on human beings, rather than pets, livestock or inanimate property, can trigger charges under this statute. In alleged criminal cases, it is the State rather than the attack victim who lays the charges.

Canada - Newfoundland and Labrador Statutes - Dog Act(Repealed) R.S.N. 1990, c. D-26, s. 1 - 15(2)(Repealed)

This act was replaced by the Animal Health and Protection Act in 2010. This set of laws comprises the Newfoundland and Labrador Dog Act. Under the Act, an owner of a dog must keep it safely tethered or penned up at all times unless on a leash, herding sheep, or hunting with an owner. The minister may in writing authorize a person to destroy dogs found at large in the province. Notably, a person shall not bring into or keep on the island a dog either wholly or partly of the breed native to Labrador, commonly known as Eskimo or Husky, unless he or she has obtained a permit. A person who contravenes this Act or accompanying regulations is guilty of an offence.

Canada - New Brunswick Statutes - Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act R.S.N.B. 1973, c. S-12, s. 0.1 - 32(2) This set of laws establishes the New Brunswick Society for the Prevention of Cruelty. Under the Act, the Minister may appoint an officer, agent or employee of the society or any other person to be an animal protection officer who shall attend to the enforcement of this Act. Where an animal has been seized under this Act, the animal protection officer shall within 3 business days notify the owner or make reasonable attempts to identify and notify the owner. A person who has ownership, possession or the care and control of an animal shall provide the animal with food, water, shelter and care in accordance with the regulations.
Canada - New Brunswick Statutes. Sheep Protection Act R.S.N.B. 1973, c. S-7, s. 1 - 6 This set of New Brunswick laws comprises the Sheep Protection Act. Under the Act, where a sheep is killed or injured by a dog, the owner of the sheep may, within forty-eight hours, notify the Minister. The Minister then appoints an investigator who reports his or her findings back to the Minister. The Minister may then recover the expenses of the investigation from the owner of the dog, and may order the destruction of the dog.
Canada - Nova Scotia Statutes - Sheep Protection Act R.S.N.S. 1989, c. 424, s. 1 - 18(4) This set of Nova Scotia laws comprises the Sheep Protection Act. Under the Act, any person may kill any dog which is found pursuing, worrying, wounding, killing or injuring sheep or is found straying at any time, and not under proper control, upon premises where sheep are usually kept. Within forty-eight hours after an owner discovers that one or more of his or her sheep have been killed or injured by a dog or dogs, he or she shall notify a sheep valuer who immediately makes a report in writing giving in detail the extent and amount of the damage. Where a dog is known to have killed or injured sheep, the owner on being duly notified shall within forty-eight hours cause the dog to be killed.
Canada - Northwest Territories Statutes/Nunavut - Dog Act R.S.N.W.T. 1988, c. D-7, s. 1 This set of laws comprises the Northwest Territories Dog Act. Under the Act, owners may not allow their dogs to run loose and must provide them with sufficient food and water. Further, the law provides that no person shall punish or abuse a dog in a manner or to an extent that is cruel or unnecessary or drive a dog or dog team on a sidewalk situated on the street or road of a settlement. The law also sets forth the procedure for the impoundment and release of dogs. For the latest version of this Act, see the pdf.
Canada - Ontario - Ontario Statutes - Animals for Research Act R.S.O. 1990, c. A.22 s.1 - This set of laws comprises the Ontario Animals for Research Act. The law requires an operator to be licenced; the licence may be revoked or suspended where, among other things, the operator commits animal cruelty or neglect. Research facilities under this act are also subject to registration. Notably, the Act provides that every animal used in a registered research facility in any experiment that is likely to result in pain to the animal shall be anaesthetized so as to prevent the animal from suffering unnecessary pain. Further, the operator of a research facility shall provide analgesics adequate to prevent an animal from suffering unnecessary pain during the period of its recovery from any procedure used in an experiment.
Canada - Ontario - Dog Owners' Liability Act R.S.O. 1990, c. D.16, s. 1 - 20(4) This Ontario, Canada set of laws comprises the Dog Owners' Liability Act. The main thrust of the law is to establish that an owner is liable for damages if his or her dog bites or attacks another person or domestic animal. Proceedings may be commenced in the Ontario Court of Justice against an owner of a dog if it is alleged that the dog attacked or bitten another person or domestic animal, or if the dog has behaved in a manner that poses a menace to the safety of persons or domestic animals. A court may then order the destruction of the dog, or measures for more effective control of the dog (leash restraint, muzzling, etc.). The Act also bans the owning, breeding, importing, or transferring of pit bull dogs in Ontario, save for dogs grandfathered in before the Act took effect in 2005 (then the dog is a "restricted pit bull" subject to further laws).
Canada - Ontario - Ontario Statutes - Ontario Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act R.S.O. 1990, c. O.36, s. 1 - 19

This set of laws comprises Ontario, Canada's Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act. The object of the Society is to facilitate and provide for the prevention of cruelty to animals and their protection and relief therefrom. The laws outline the requirements for formation and operation of the Society as well as the guidelines under which members can assist animals in distress. Section 15 provides the standards of care for keeping cats or dogs for breeding or sale. 2015 amendments include the prohibition on the sale, purchase, and breeding of orcas.

Canada - P.E.I. Statutes. Dog Act R.S.P.E.I. 1988, c. D-13 s.1 - 21

This set of laws comprises the Prince Edward Island (PEI) Dog Act. The Act provides that no owner of a dog shall allow his dog to run at large; any dog found at large shall be deemed to have been allowed to be at large by its owner. In addition, the owner of livestock or any enforcement officer authorized by the owner of livestock, may kill a dog that is killing or injuring the owner's livestock, except where the livestock is on property held under lease, license or permit by the owner of the dog. This Act also outlines licensing requirements for dogs as well as impoundment procedures.

Canada - Yukon Statutes - Dog Act R.S.Y. 2002, c. 59 This set of laws comprises the Yukon Dog Act. The law provides that an owner must keep his or her dog fed and watered and not punish it to an extent that is cruel or unnecessary. Dogs found at large contrary to the Act are impounded for a period of five days for owners to reclaim them. The Act also states that a person may kill a dog that is running at large in the act of pursuing, worrying, injuring or destroying cattle, horses, sheep, pigs or poultry.
Canada - Yukon Statutes. Animal Protection Act R.S.Y. 2002, c. 6, s. 1 - 14 This set of laws comprises the Yukon, Canada Animal Protection Act. The Act provides that no person shall cause or allow an animal to be in distress. Any person who contravenes this Act is guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to a fine of not more than $500 and, in default of payment, to imprisonment up to six months, or to both fine and imprisonment. A judge may also prohibit a person convicted of an offence under the Act from owning an animal or from having charge of an animal for any specified time period. The Act also outlines the power of peace officers to seize animals in distress as well as those powers of humane societies to provide care for such animals.
OH - Dog - Chapter 955. Dogs (Consolidated dog laws) RC §§ 955.01 - 99; § 9.62; § 1533.19 - 221 This is the Ohio statute that regulates dogs in general, outlining rules and regulations for dog owners. The state leash requirement appears limited to rabies quarantines (Sec. 955.26). It also gives the definition of what is considered a dangerous or vicious dog, the rules and regulations for owners of these dogs, and penalization for breaking these rules.
WA - Facility dog - 10.52.110. Courthouse facility dog program RCW 10.52.110 This 2019 law allows courts to permit a courthouse facility dog by witnesses in any judicial proceeding.
WA - Shark - 77.15.770. Unlawful trade in shark fins--Penalty RCWA 77.15.770 Under this Washington statute, it is unlawful to trade in shark fins, with exceptions. A person is guilty in the second degree (gross misdemeanor) if s/he sells, purchases, or processes a shark fin for commercial purposes. A person is guilty of unlawful trade in shark fins in the first degree (class C felony) if the act involves shark fins with a total market value of $250 or more, or acted with knowledge that the shark fin originated from a shark that was illegally caught.
EU - Seals - Regulation (EC) No 1007/2009 on trade in seal products. Regulation (EC) No 1007/2009

This regulation bans the trade of seal products on the Union market, harmonising national legislation in this area.

EU - Fur - Regulation (EC) No 1523/2007 (dog and cat fur ban) Regulation (EC) No 1523/2007
The European Union (EU) bans trade in cat and dog fur, including imports and exports. It also introduces accompanying measures to ensure the effectiveness of this ban.
PH - Cruelty - THE ANIMAL WELFARE ACT OF 1998 REPUBLIC ACT NO. 8485

It is the purpose of this Act to protect and promote the welfare of all animals in the Philippines by supervising and regulating the establishment and operations of all facilities utilized for breeding, maintaining, keeping, treating or training of all animals either as objects of trade or as household pets. For purposes of this Act, pet animal shall include birds.

Colombia, Resolución 8430, 1993 Resolución 8430, 1993 Resolution 8430, 1993 of the Colombian Ministry of Health, establishes scientific, technical, and administrative norms for investigation in the health field. Title V of this resolution regulates the biomedical research on animals.
Resolución Legislativa 26181, 1992 Resolución Legislativa 26181, 1992 This legislative resolution adopts the Convention on Biological Diversity signed in Rio de Janeiro in June 5, 1992. The CBD strives for the conservation and sustainability of biodiversity and its components.
RU - Cruelty - Responsible Treatment of Animals Responsible Treatment of Animals The Law on Responsible Treatment of Animals, signed by Vladimir Putin in 2018, prohibits the killing of animals “under any pretext.” The law also outlaws shooting or poisoning stray dogs and cats, which has occurred in Russian cities in recent years according to news sources. Under the law, owners must keep their pets in proper conditions and homeless animals must be taken-up, vaccinated, sterilized, and then released by local agencies. One of the primary purposes of the laws is to ban petting zoos at malls and the practice of bars and restaurants hosting animals. The conducting of animal fights is also banned under the new law.
UK - Riding - Riding Establishments Act 1964 Riding Establishments Act 1964

An Act to regulate the keeping of riding establishments; and for purposes connected therewith.

AU - Rural Lands Protection Act 1998 (NSW) Rural Lands Protection Act 1998

An Act to provide for the protection of rural lands; to provide for the establishment of the State Policy Council of Livestock Health and Pest Authorities and the constitution of livestock health and pest authorities and the State Management Council of Livestock Health and Pest Authorities and for the functions of those bodies; to regulate travelling stock reserves, stock watering places and the transportation of stock by vehicle; to provide for the control of certain pests; and for other purposes.

SD - Assistance Animal - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws S D C L § 20-13-23.1 - 4, 32-27-7 - 8; 40-1-38 - 40; 43-32-33 - 36 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
SD - Endangered Species - Chapter 34A-8. Endangered and Threatened Species S D C L § 34A-8-1 - 13; 34A-8A-1 - 9 These South Dakota statutes provide the definitions and regulations related to endangered and threatened species in the state. Under statute, state agencies shall establish and conduct control programs at state expense on private lands that are encroached upon by prairie dogs from contiguous public lands. It is a misdemeanor to take, possess, transport, import, export, process, sell or offer for sale, buy or offer to buy (nor may a common or contract carrier transport or receive for shipment) a listed species as defined by statute.
SD - Veterinary - Chapter 36-12. Veterinarians. S D C L § 36-12-1 - 29 These are the state's veterinary practice laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.
SD - Exotic Pets - Chapter 40-3. State Animal Industry Board (captive wildlife provisions) S D C L § 40-3-23 - 29; SDCL § 7-12-29 These South Dakota statutes establish the Animal Industry Board, which promulgate rules to allow nondomestic mammals that are safe to the public and to the free-roaming animals of the state to be imported or possessed. The Board regulates the breeding, raising, marketing, and transportation of any captive nondomestic mammals. The Board may also develop and implement programs to identify animals and premises involved to further animal health and food safety.
SD - Bite - Chapter 40-34. Dog Licenses and Regulation (Vicious Dog Provisions) S D C L § 40-34-13 to 16 This South Dakota statute provides that a vicious dog, defined as any dog which, when unprovoked, in a vicious manner approaches in apparent attitude of attack, or bites, or otherwise attacks a human being including a mailman, meter reader, serviceman, etc. who is on private property by reason of permission of the owner, is a public nuisance. However, no dog may be declared vicious if an injury or damage is sustained to any person who was committing a willful trespass or other tort upon premises occupied by the owner or keeper of the dog, or who was teasing, tormenting, abusing or assaulting the dog or was committing or attempting to commit a crime.
SD - Licenses - 40-34-5. Running at large prohibited by county--County license or tax on dogs S D C L § 40-34-5 This South Dakota statute provides that the board of county commissioners of each of the counties shall have the power to regulate, restrain or prohibit the running at large of dogs and to impose a license or tax on all dogs not licensed or taxed under municipal ordinance, owned or kept by any person within the county.
SD - Fur - Chapter 40-35. Domesticated Fur-Bearing Animals. S D C L § 40-35-1 to 6 These South Dakota statutes pertain to domesticated fur-bearing animals. These animals are subject to private ownership, and documentation is required to possess live fur-bearing animals. Products made from domestic furbearers are considered to be agricultural products and breeding such animals, or marketing the products, is an agricultural pursuit subject to the Department of Agriculture.
SD - Predator Control - Chapter 40-36. Predatory Animal and Reptile Control. S D C L § 40-36-1 - 46 These South Dakota statutes pertain to predatory animal and reptile control. The Department of Game, Fish and Parks and the United States Fish and Wildlife Service work together to control coyotes, feral dogs, fox, prairie dogs, and other wild animals that are injurious to livestock, poultry, game, land, and the public health. Bounties may be paid for coyotes, if the bounty hunter has a license.
SD - Ecoterrorism - Chapter 40-38. Protection of Animal Facilities S D C L § 40-38-1 - 5 This chapter comprises South Dakota's animal enterprise interference laws. Under the section, it is illegal for a person to intentionally damage or destroy an animal facility, an animal, or property in or on the animal facility; exercise control over the animal facility or an animal located therein; enter the animal facility with the intent to commit prohibited acts; enter an animal facility and remain concealed with the intent to commit prohibited acts; or intentionally release an animal on an animal facility. Violation is a misdemeanor of varying degrees if the damaged property value is less than $1,000 and a Class 4 felony if above $1,000. Any person who violates subdivisions 40-38-2(2) to (5), inclusive, is guilty of a Class 4 felony.
SD - Vehicle - 41-1-5.7. Disposition of deer and antelope killed by motor vehicle S D C L § 41-1-5.7 This South Dakota statute states that if any deer or antelope is killed by a motor vehicle on a public highway, the person who desires to possess that animal shall notify a conservation officer. The conservation officer may give a dated and written authorization allowing possession of the animal at no fee. However, no part of an animal so obtained may be sold, bartered, or traded.
SD - Hunting - 41-1-8. Interference with lawful hunting, trapping, or fishing prohibited--Violation as misdemeanor S D C L § 41-1-8 to 10 This South Dakota law reflects the state's hunter harassment provision. The law prohibits a person from intentionally interfering with any person or group of persons lawfully engaged in the process of taking or attempting to take any game or fish. This includes actions specifically intended to harass and any activity intended to scare or disturb game with the specific intent of preventing their lawful taking. Violation is a Class 2 misdemeanor.

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