Horses: Related Statutes

Statute by categorysort ascending Citation Summary
NH - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 427. Livestock and Meat Inspection. Humane Slaughter N.H. Rev. Stat. § 427:33 - 427:37

These laws comprise New Hampshire's humane slaughter provisions.  A humane method is defined as one where the animal is rendered insensible to pain by a single blow or shot of a mechanical instrument or by electrical, chemical or other means that is rapid and effective, before being shackled, hoisted, thrown, cast, or cut.  Ritual slaughter required by the ritual of the Jewish faith, whereby the animal suffers loss of consciousness by anemia of the brain is also allowed.  Any slaughterer who violates this subdivision shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

NH - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 508. Limitation of Actions. N.H. Rev. Stat. § 508:19

This New Hampshire statute provides that an equine activity sponsor, an equine professional, or any other person engaged in an equine activity, shall not be liable for an injury or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of equine activities.  However, liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant.  The statute also sets out several definitions and specifically states that the term "engages in an equine activity" does not include being a spectator at an equine activity, except in cases where the spectator is in an unauthorized area and in immediate proximity to the equine activity.

New York Penal Law 1866: Chapter 682: Section 2 N.Y. Rev. Stat. 682.2 (1866)

Chapter 682 from New York Penal Law of 1866 covers cruelty to animals.  Section 2 from this chapter describes the offense entitled neglect of disabled animals.  The law states the penalty for leaving a disabled or diseased animal to die on any state or city land.  

NE - Horse Slaughter - Article 19. Meat and Poultry Inspection. (a) Nebraska Meat and Poultry Inspection Law Neb. Rev. St. § 54-1901 - 1915

The Nebraska Meat and Poultry Inspection Law assures that only wholesome meat and poultry products enter regular commercial channels of commerce and to provide that same are identified and truthfully labeled. It is unlawful under the act for any person to operate or maintain any establishment unless first licensed by the department. With regard to horses, it is unlawful for any person to sell, transport, offer for sale or transportation, or receive for transportation, in intrastate commerce any carcasses of horses, mules, or other equines or parts of such carcasses, or the meat or meat food products thereof, unless they are plainly and conspicuously marked or labeled or otherwise identified as required by regulations prescribed by the director to show the kinds of animals from which they were derived.

NE - Equine Activity Liability - Article 21. Actions and Proceedings in Particular Cases. (EE) Equine Activities Neb. Rev. St. § 25-21,249 - 253

This Nebraska statute provides that an equine activity sponsor, an equine professional, or any other person shall not be liable for an injury to or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of equine activities and no participant shall make any claim against, maintain an action against, or recover from an equine activity sponsor.  Statutory definitions are provided, including "participant," "inherent risk," and who is considered an "equine sponsor" or "equine professional."  Engages in an equine activity does not include being a spectator at an equine activity except in cases when the spectator places himself or herself in an unauthorized area.  The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law.

ND - Equine Activity - Chapter 53-10. Equine Activity Sponsor or Professional. NDCC 53-10-01; NDCC 53-10-02

This North Dakota statute provides that an equine activity sponsor or an equine professional is not liable for an injury to or the death of a participant engaged in an equine activity and no participant may maintain an action against an equine activity sponsor or professional.  Statutory definitions are provided, including "participant," "equine activity," and who is considered an "equine sponsor" or "equine professional."   Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant.

NC - Service Animals - § 20-187.4. Disposition of retired service animals N.C.G.S.A. § 20-187.4 This statute allows for a retired service animal to be transferred to an officer or employee who had custody of the animal during the animal's public service, a surviving spouse or surviving children of a deceased officer or employee who had custody of the animal during its service, or an organization dedicated to assisting retired service animals.
NC - Equine Activity Liability - Article 1. Equine Activity Liability N.C.G.S.A. § 99E-1 to 99E-9

This act stipulates that an equine sponsor or equine professional, or any other person, including corporations and partnerships, are immune from liability for the death or injury of a participant, which resulted from the inherent risks of equine activities. New provisions added in 2013 now also protect a farm animal activity sponsor, a farm animal professional, or any other person engaged in a farm animal activity, including a corporation or partnership, shall not be liable for an injury to or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of farm animal activities.   However, there are exceptions to this rule:   a person, corporation, or partnership will be held liable for injuries of an equine activity participant if he or she displays a willful and wanton or intentional disregard for the safety of the participant and if he or she fails to make reasonable and prudent efforts in ensuring the safety of the participant.

MT - Horse Slaughter - Chapter 9. Slaughter. MCA 81-9-240, 241

This Montana statute limits the ability of a court to issue an injunction aimed at delaying or stopping the construction of an equine slaughter or processing facility. Additionally, the law provides that if a person files an action against the operation of an equine slaughter or processing facility and does not prevail, the person is liable for all financial losses the facility suffers if the court issues an injunction that halts operations while the action is pending.

MT - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 1. Availability of Remedies--Liability. MCA 27-1-725 to 27-1-728

The Montana equine activity liability act provides that it is the policy of the state of Montana that a person is not liable for damages sustained by another solely as a result of risks inherent in equine activities if those risks are or should be reasonably obvious, expected, or necessary to persons engaged in equine activities.  Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant.

MS - Slaughter - Chapter 35. Meat Inspection Miss. Code Ann. § 75-35-1 to 75-35-327

These Mississippi statutes regulate meat products, animal slaughter, inspection and branding. Animals to be slaughtered must examined and slaughtered humanely, which means being “rendered insensible to pain... before being shackled, hoisted, thrown, cast or cut.” Meat and meat products must be labeled “Mississippi inspected and passed.” Any violation of the provisions may result in imprisonment and/or a fine.

MS - Horses - Slaughter (Chapter 33. Meat, Meat-Food and Poultry Regulation and Inspection) Miss. Code Ann. § 75-33-3

Construes the phrase "unfit for human consumption" in the very broad Mississippi Meat Inspection Act of 1960 to apply to horse meat and meat-food products.   

MS - Equine Activity Liability - Chapter 11. Liability Exemption for Livestock Shows and Equine Activities Miss. Code Ann. § 95-11-1 to 95-11- 7

This Mississippi statute embodies the the intent of the Legislature to encourage equine and livestock activities by limiting the civil liability of those involved in such activities.  Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine or livestock activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant.  The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law.

MO - Equine Activity Liability - 537.325. Definitions--liability for equine or livestock V. A. M. S. 537.325

This Missouri statute provides that an equine activity sponsor, an equine professional or any other person shall not be liable for an injury to or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of equine activities and no participant shall make maintain an action against an equine operator.  Statutory definitions are provided, including "participant," "inherent risk," and who is considered an "equine sponsor" or "equine professional."  The term "engages in an equine activity" does not include being a spectator at an equine activity, except in cases where the spectator places him or herself in an unauthorized area.  The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law.

MN - Meat - Chapter 31. Food. Meats, Generally M. S. A. § 31.60 - 31.65

This Minnesota chapter deals with sale and processing of meat in the state. Among the provisions include a prohibition on the sale of veal when calves are killed when less than four weeks old; the sale of horse meat for human consumption unless conspicuous notices are provided; and the sale of unwholesome game or poultry. The chapter also creates a Meat Industry Division in the Department of Agriculture who enforces and administers these laws.

MN - Equine Activity Liability - 604A.12. Livestock activities; immunity from liability. M. S. A. § 604A.12

This Minnesota statute comprises the state's equine activity liability statute.  The act is not limited to equines, but rather extends protection from liability to participants engaged in "livestock activities." It is important to note that this provision and exemption from liability applies only to non-profit entities . Liability is not limited where the livestock professional knowingly used faulty tack, the person failed to reasonable care to protect the participant from a known, human-made dangerous condition, the person is a livestock activity sponsor and fails to comply with the notice requirement, or the act or omission of the person was willful or negligent. 

MI - Service Animal - Chapter 750. Michigan Penal Code. The Michigan Penal Code. M.C.L.A. 750.50c

This statute outlines the penalty for the intentional physical harm or interference with a police dog or horse.  The statute provides for a misdemeanor in the case of interference to the animal and a five-year felony where the animal was killed or seriously physically injured.  If the interference was committed during the commission of another felony, then the penalty rises to a potential two-year imprisonment.

MI - Food animal - § 750.477a Sale of unlabelled horse and dog meat M.C.L.A. 750.477a This Michigan statute makes it a misdemeanor for an individual to knowingly sell any horse or dog meat unless it is plainly labelled.
MI - Equine Liability - Chapter 691. Judiciary. Equine Activity Liability Act MCLA 691.1661 - 1667 This act stipulates that an equine sponsor or professional, or any other person, is immune from liability for the death or injury of a participant, which resulted from the inherent risks of equine activities. However, there are exceptions to this rule: a person will be held liable for injuries if he or she commits a negligent act or omission that results in the proximate cause of injury or death, and if he or she fails to make reasonable and prudent efforts in ensuring the safety of the participant. In addition, a person will also be held liable for the injury of an equine activity participant if he or she is injured on the land or at a facility due to a dangerous latent condition of which was known to the equine sponsor, professional or other person.
ME - Horsemeat - § 2163. Sale of horsemeat 22 M.R.S.A. § 2163

This Maine statute provides that no person shall transport, receive for transportation, sell or offer for sale or distribution any equine meat or food products thereof unless said equine meat is plainly and conspicuously labeled, marked, branded and tagged “horsemeat” or “horsemeat products” unless such equine meat is conspicuously branded and labeled and a notice containing the words “horsemeat and horsemeat products sold here” is conspicuously displayed in said place of business. Any person, firm or corporation who shall violate any of the provisions of this section shall be punished by a fine of not more than $100 for the first offense and by a fine of not more than $200 for each subsequent offense, and the District and Superior Courts shall have concurrent jurisdiction of the offense.

ME - Equine Liability - Chapter 743. Equine Activities 7 M. R. S. A. § 4101 - 4104-A

This act stipulates that an equine sponsor, equine professional, or any other person engaged in an equine activity, is immune from liability for the death or injury of a participant, as well as property damage, which resulted from the inherent risks of equine activities.   However, there are exceptions to this rule:   A person will be held liable for injuries of an equine activity participant if he or she displays a willful and wanton or intentional disregard for the safety of the participant and if he or she fails to make reasonable and prudent efforts in ensuring the safety of the participant.   In addition, a person will also be held liable for the injury of an equine activity participant if he or she is injured on the land or at a facility due to a dangerous latent condition of which was known to the equine sponsor, professional or other person.

MD - Equine Transport - Subtitle 9. Transporting Horses. MD Code, Agriculture §§ 3-901 - 903

This Maryland section provides the requirements for transporting horses. The law states that "[a] person may not transport a horse in a vehicle that is not designed and constructed in a manner that at all times protects the health and well-being of the horse being transported." Of importance is the provision that limits the vehicle used to transport the horses to one level (e.g., no double-deck trailers are allowed). Violation of the law incurs a civil penalty in the amount of $500 per horse for the first offense and $1,000 for each subsequent offense.

MA - Horse - § 3. Sleigh or sled; bells M.G.L.A. 89 § 3 This Massachusetts law states that no person shall travel on a way with a sleigh or sled drawn by a horse, unless there are at least three bells attached to some part of the harness.
MA - Equine transport - License plates for vehicles transporting equine animals M.G.L.A. 129 § 46 - 48

This Massachusetts law provides that vehicles transporting equines must have a special license plate. Also, the use of multiple deck vehicles or the so-called "possum belly" vehicle used in the transportation of equine animals is prohibited.

MA - Equine Activity Liability Statute - Chapter 128. Agriculture. M.G.L.A. 128 § 2D

This Massachusetts law provides that an equine activity sponsor, an equine professional, or any other person shall not be liable for an injury to or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of equine activities.  The statute sets out several definitions related to equine activities, but specifically notes that the term "engage in an equine activity" shall not include being a spectator at an equine activity, except in cases where the spectator places himself in an unauthorized area or in immediate proximity to the equine activity.  Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant. 

LA - Lien, veterinary - § 4661. Feed, medicine, and veterinary services for horses LSA-R.S. 9:4661

This Louisiana law comprises the state's veterinary lien law, which relates only to services provided on horses. Any person who furnishes feed or medicines for a horse or horses, or any licensed veterinarian who furnishes medical services for a horse or horses, to or upon the order of the owner, has a privilege for the unpaid portion of the price thereof upon the horse or horses of the owner, which received the feed, medicine, or medical services.

LA - Horses - § 2851. Livestock not to go on paved, black-topped and asphalt treated highways LSA-R.S. 3:2851 Under this Louisiana law, it is unlawful for lawful for horses, mules, donkeys, or asses to go on the paved, black-topped and asphalt treated highways of the state.
LA - Equine Activity Liability - § 2795.1. Limitation of liability of farm animal activity LSA-R.S. 9:2795.1 - 9:2795.3

The Louisiana law regarding equine activity liability is divided into two sections; one related to "farm animal activity" and one specific to "equine activity sponsors."  Both statutes have identical terms, save for the animal to which the statute pertains.  Under both, engaging in the farm animal or equine activity does not include being a spectator at a farm animal activity, except in cases where the spectator places himself in an unauthorized area and in immediate proximity to the farm animal or equine activity.  The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law and any written contracts must include the statutory language provided.  Failure to comply with the requirements concerning warning notices provided prevents a farm animal activity sponsor or equine sponsor from invoking the privilege of immunity provided by this section.

KY - Horse - Chapter 189. Traffic Regulations KRS § 189.510

This interesting Kentucky law provides that no person shall ride a horse, nor shall the owner of a horse consent to the racing of his horse, in a horse race on a highway.

KY - Horse - 436.185 Exhibition of walking horse where the horse's front legs or hoofs show evidence of KRS § 436.185 This law prohibits the showing or exhibition of a walking horse that shows evidence of burns, drugs, lacerations, any sharp pointed instrument, or any pain inflicting device. It is the duty of the ringmaster to inspect horses for such evidence. Failure of the ringmaster to do so results in a $10 - $100 fine.
KY - Equine Activity Liability Statute - Chapter 247. Promotion of Agriculture and Horticulture. Farm Animal Activities. KRS § 247.401 - 4029

This Kentucky statute embodies the the legislative intent to encourage farm animal activities activities by limiting the civil liability of those involved in such activities.  Statutory definitions are provided, including "inherent risks of farm animal activities" and "engages in farm animal activity."  The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law.  Failure to comply with the requirements concerning warning signs and notices provided in this section shall prevent a farm animal activity sponsor or farm animal professional from invoking the provisions of KRS 247.401 to 247.4029. 

KS - Racing - 74-8801 to 74-8842. Parimutuel Wagering K. S. A. §§ 74-8801 to 74-8842. This statute creates the Kansas Racing and Gaming Commission. The Commission has the power to observe and inspect all racetracks and is responsible for promulgating regulations including regulations establishing what drugs and at what levels are allowable in the blood or urine of horses and greyhounds. The statute specifies age limits for horses and greyhounds to be able to race. Horses cannot compete until they reach 2 years of age. Greyhounds cannot compete in a race until they reach the age of 15 months. In order to construct or own a racetrack facility a license must be obtained from the Commission.
KS - Equine Activity Liability - Article 40. Assumption of Risk of Domestic Animal Activity. K. S. A. 60-4001 to 4004

This Kansas statute provides that any participant in domestic animal activities assumes the inherent risks of when such participant engages in a domestic animal activity.  This limitation of liability operates legally as an affirmative defense of assumption of risk pleaded by the domestic animal activity sponsor or domestic animal professional.  The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law and any written contract must provide explicit language outlined in the statute.

IN - Humane Slaughter - Chapter 5. Meat and Poultry Inspection; Humane Slaughter Act I.C. 15-17-5-1 to 31

This Indiana statutory section comprises both the state's meat processing laws and humane slaughter provisions.   The state board responsible for carrying out this Act are empowered to adopt rules governing humane methods to make livestock or poultry insensible to pain before incision of an instrument for severance of the carotid arteries. The rules must conform as far as applicable to the regulations promulgated under the Federal Humane Slaughter Act.  Most of the laws in this section pertain to inspection of commercial livestock facilities and the labeling of postmortem and antemortem animals.  However, violation of the humane slaughter provisions appear to result in a Class B misdemeanor where there has been a "reckless violation."

IN - Equine Activity Statute - Chapter 5. Equine Activities I.C. 34-31-5-1 to 5

This Indiana statute states that an equine activity sponsor or equine professional is not liable for an injury to a participant or the death of a participant resulting from an inherent risk of equine activities.  Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes reckless disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant.  The statute also requires the visible displaying of warning signs or warnings provided in contracts that alert participants to the limitation of liability by law.

IL - Horse Meat Act - Chapter 225. Professions and Occupations. 225 ILCS 635/1 - 18

This Act prohibits the slaughter of horses for human consumption as well as importing, exporting, selling, giving, or even possessing horse meat if a person knows or should know that it will be used for human consumption.  Violation of this section of the Act is a Class C misdemeanor.  The Act does contain several exceptions. Notably, it does not apply to any commonly accepted noncommercial, recreational, or sporting activities.

IL - Equine Liability Act - Equine Activity Liability Act 745 I.L.C.S. 47/1 - 47/999 This act stipulates that an equine sponsor or professional, or any other person, is immune from liability for the death or injury of a participant, which resulted from the inherent risks of equine activities. However, there are exceptions to this rule; a person will be held liable for injuries of an equine activity participant if he or she displays a willful and wanton or intentional disregard for the safety of the participant and if he or she fails to make reasonable and prudent efforts in ensuring the safety of the participant. In addition, a person will also be held liable for the injury of an equine activity participant if he or she is injured on the land or at a facility due to a dangerous latent condition of which was known to the equine sponsor, professional or other person.
IL - Cruelty - Horse Mutilation Act 720 ILCS 5/48-5

This act  text  prevents the docking of horses' tails. Violation results in a Class A misdemeanor.

ID - Equine Activity Liability - CHAPTER 18. EQUINE ACTIVITIES IMMUNITY ACT. I.C. § 6-1801 - 1802

This Idaho statute provides that an equine activity sponsor or an equine professional shall not be liable for any injury to or the death of a participant or equine engaged in an equine activity and no participant may maintain an action against an equine activity sponsor or professional.  Statutory definitions are provided, including "participant," "equine," and who is considered an "equine sponsor" or "equine professional."  Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant. 

IA - Racing - 99D.1 to 99D.28. Pari-Mutuel Wagering I.C.A. § 99D.1 - 99D.28 This act legalizes and only applies to pari-mutuel wagering on dog and horse races in the state of Iowa. The act creates a state racing and gaming commission which has full jurisdiction to investigate applicants, adopt standards, and regulate all horse and dog races governed by the act. Organizations that wish to conduct horse and dog racing must apply to the commission for a license and meet the requirements. Tracks that are licensed to race dogs are required to maintain a racing dog adoption program.
IA - Equine Activity Liability Statute - Chapter 673. Domesticated Animal Activities. I. C. A. § 673.1 - .5

This Iowa statute provides that a domesticated animal professional, sponsor, or exhibitor is not liable for the damages, injury, or death suffered by a participant or spectator resulting from the inherent risks of a domesticated animal activity.  However, this section shall not apply to the extent that the claim for damages, injury, or death is caused by an act committed intentionally, recklessly, or while under the influence of an alcoholic beverage or other drug, the knowing use of faulty equipment or tack, the failure to notify a participant of a known dangerous latent condition on real property in which the defendant holds an interest, a domesticated animal activity which occurs in a place designated as a place for persons who are not participants to be present, or a domesticated animal activity which causes damages, injury, or death to a spectator who is in a place where a reasonable person would not expect a domesticated animal activity to occur.  Not only does the statute require the displaying of warning signs alerting participants to the limitation of liability of the equine operators, but in cases where a written contract is executed, special provisions must be present on the contract.

HI - Equine Activity Liability Statute H R S § 663B-1, B-2

Hawaii is unique in how it treats liability for injuries incurred during equine activities.  The relevant section provides that, in any civil action for injury, loss, damage, or death of an equine participant, there shall be a rebuttable presumption that the injury, loss, damage, or death was not caused by the negligence of an equine activity sponsor, equine professional, or their employees or agents, if the injury, loss, damage, or death was caused solely by the inherent risk and unpredictable nature of the equine.  Liability is not limited by this statute where the equine professional knowingly provided faulty tack or equipment, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine or activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land or facilities upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a known, dangerous latent condition, or if he or she commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant or intentionally injures the participant. 

GA - Horses - Chapter 13. Humane Care for Equines. Ga. Code Ann., § 4-13-1 to 10

This section comprises Georgia's Humane Care for Equines Act. The act states that it is unlawful for the owner of any equine to fail to provide adequate food and water to such equine; to fail to provide humane care for such equine; or to unnecessarily overload, overdrive, torment, or beat any equine or to cause the death of any equine in a cruel or inhumane manner. The Act also outlines procedures for the care impounded of equines as well as disposal procedures, which includes auction and euthanasia, when the owner cannot be found or refuses to enter into a consent order. Violation of this chapter results a misdemeanor.

GA - Horse Meat - Article 4. Advertisement and Sale of Meat Generally. Ga. Code Ann., § 26-2-150 to 161

As stated in the legislative intent, the General Assembly declares that purchasers and consumers have a right to expect and demand honesty and fair practices in the sale of meat for human consumption. It is the purpose of this Code to ensure that honest, fair, and ethical practices are followed in the advertising and sale of meat for human consumption. With regard to horsemeat, the Code prohibits the slaughter a horse in this state for the purpose of selling or offering for sale for human consumption or for other than human consumption the horse meat derived from such slaughtered animal unless certain conditions are met. Further, no horse meat shall be sold or offered for sale in this state for human consumption unless at the place of sale there shall be posted in a conspicuous location a sign bearing the words “HORSE MEAT FOR SALE.”

GA - Equine Liability Act - Chapter 12. Injuries from Equine or Llama Activities. Ga. Code Ann., § 4-12-1 to 7 This act stipulates that an equine sponsor or professional, or a llama sponsor or professional, or any other person, including corporations, are immune from liability for the death or injury of a participant, which resulted from the inherent risks of equine or llama activities.   However, there are exceptions to this rule:   A person will be held liable for injuries if they display a willful and wanton or intentional disregard for the safety of the participant and if they fail to make reasonable and prudent efforts in ensuring the safety of the participant.
FL - Horse Slaughter - Chapter 828. Animals: Cruelty; Sales; Animal Enterprise Protection. West's F. S. A. § 828.125

Florida Governor Charlie Crist signed this amendment into law on May 17, 2010 making it a second-degree felony for any person to willfully and unlawfully, by any means whatsoever, kill, maim, mutilate, or cause great bodily harm or permanent breeding disability to any animal of the genus Equus (horse). Any person who commits a violation of this subsection shall be sentenced to a minimum mandatory fine of $3,500 and a minimum mandatory period of incarceration of 1 year.

FL - Equine Activity Liability Statute- Chapter 773. Equine Activities. West's F. S. A. § 773.01 - 773.06

This Florida statute provides that an equine activity sponsor, an equine professional, or any other person shall not be liable for an injury to or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of equine activities.  Liability will not be limited by statute, however, where the equine professional or sponsor knew the tack or equipment was faulty, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage safely in the equine activity, owns or is otherwise in lawful possession of the land or facilities where the injury is attributable to a known dangerous latent condition, commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant, or intentionally injures the participant.  Posting of warning signs alerting participants to the limitation of liability by law is also required.

DE - Equine Activity Liability - § 8140. CHAPTER 81. PERSONAL ACTIONS. 10 Del.C. § 8140

This Delaware statute provides that an equine activity sponsor, an equine professional or any other person shall not be liable for an injury to or the death of a participant resulting from the inherent risks of equine activities.  Liability is not limited, however, when the equine professional knowingly used faulty tack, failed to make reasonable and prudent efforts to determine the ability of the participant to engage in the activity, owns or otherwise is in lawful possession of the land upon which the participant sustained injuries because of a dangerous latent condition which was known, commits an act or omission that constitutes willful or wanton disregard for the safety of the participant, or intentionally injures the participant.  Equine professionals and sponsors are also required to post warning signs alerting the participants to the limitation of liability by law.

DC - Horses - Chapter 20. Horse-Drawn Carriages. DC CODE § 8-2001 - 2013

This DC regulation makes it unlawful to operate a horse-drawn carriage trade without a license and an ID card. The regulations forbid certain types of bits and require that each horse wear a diaper. Horses may not be worked or driven for more than 8 hours a day. Horses must be rested, provided with food and water. A violation of the regulations may result in a fine of $300 (1st offense). A serious intentional injury to the horse by neglect or inhumane treatment shall be fined up to $2,500.

CT - Racing - Chapter 226. Gaming Policy, Regulation and Revenue C. G. S. A. § 12-557-12-586 A person or business organization must have a license in order to conduct a races. The Commissioner of Consumer Protection is the one who grants the licenses. Each town must hold an election approving racing and pari-mutuel wagering in order for a license to be issued. The Commissioner may order random urine testing of race dogs. The Commissioner is also allowed to conduct investigations and hearings in order to carry out the provisions of this statute and is responsible for adopting regulations.

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