Dogs: Related Statutes

Statute by category Citationsort descending Summary
OK - Dangerous dog - § 44. Definitions 4 Okl. St. Ann. § 44 This Oklahoma statute provides the definitions related to dangerous dog laws in the state, including dangerous dog, potentially dangerous dog, severe injury, and owner, among others.
IL - Ordinances - 5/24. Powers of municipalities and other political subdivisions to regulate dogs and other animals 510 I.L.C.S. 5/24 This Illinois statute provides that nothing in the Animal Control Act shall be held to limit the power of any municipality to prohibit animals from running at large, nor shall anything in this Act be construed to limit the power of any municipality to further control and regulate dogs, cats or other animals in such municipality or other political subdivision provided that no regulation or ordinance is specific to breed.
IL - Ordinances - 5/3. Appointment of administrator; 510 I.L.C.S. 5/3 This Illinois statute provides that the County Board Chairman with the consent of the County Board shall appoint an Administrator who may appoint as many Animal Control Wardens to aid him or her as authorized by the Board. The Board is authorized by ordinance to require the registration and microchipping of dogs and cats and shall impose an individual animal and litter registration fee. All persons selling dogs or cats or keeping registries of dogs or cats shall cooperate and provide information to the Administrator as required by the Board.
IL - Ordinances - 5/5. Duties and powers 510 I.L.C.S. 5/5 This Illinois statute outlines the ;local animal control duties of the Administrator related to sterilization, humane education, rabies inoculation, stray control, impoundment, quarantine, and any other means deemed necessary, to control and prevent the spread of rabies and to exercise dog and cat overpopulation control. It also states that counties may by ordinance determine the extent of the police powers that may be exercised by the Administrator, Deputy Administrators, and Animal Control Wardens and which powers shall pertain only to this Act.
IL - Ordinances - 5/7. Remittance of fees; Animal Control Fund; use of fund; self-insurance 510 I.L.C.S. 5/7 This Illinois statute provides that all registration fees collected shall be remitted the county Animal Control Fund. This fund shall be set up for the purpose of paying costs of the Animal Control Program. This includes paying claims for loss of livestock or poultry and for other ordinance enacted measures, including the purchase of human rabies anti-serum, human vaccine, the cost for administration of serum or vaccine, minor medical care; paying the cost of stray dog control, impoundment, education on animal control and rabies; or any county or municipal ordinance as established by ordinance of the County Board. In 2013, the statute was amended to provide different provisions for how the fund shall be used for cities with 3 million or more people and for cities with less than 3 million people.
IL - Police dog - Act 82. Police Dog Retirement Act 510 I.L.C.S. 82/1 - 5 The Police Dog Retirement Act, effective on January 1, 2017, states that a public service dog that is no longer fit for service shall be offered by the law enforcement agency to the officer or employee who had custody and control of the animal during its service. This includes a search and rescue dog, service dog, accelerant detection canine, or other dog that is in use by a county, municipal, or State law enforcement agency. If the officer or employee does not wish to keep the dog, the dog may be offered to another officer or employee in the agency, or to a non-profit organization or a no-kill animal shelter.
IL - Police dog - Act 83. Police Service Dog Protection Act 510 I.L.C.S. 83/1 - 83/15 This 2019 set of laws is known as the Police Service Dog Protection Act. It requires that the law enforcement agency or handler of the police dog shall be required to have every police dog receive, at minimum, an annual medical examination by a licensed veterinarian. Further, a vehicle transporting a police dog must be equipped with a heat sensor monitoring device that provides a visual and audible notification if the interior temperature reaches 85 degrees F as well as a safety mechanism to reduce the interior temperature.
IL - Research - Act 93. Research Dogs and Cats Adoption Act 510 I.L.C.S. 93/1 - 10 This act, effective January 1, 2018, is entitled the Research Dogs and Cats Adoption Act. Under the act, a research facility shall assess the health of a dog or cat used in research and then make reasonable efforts to offer for adoption a dog or cat determined to be suitable for adoption, either through private placement or through an animal adoption organization. The research facility must have a facility adoption policy that is made available on its website.
IL - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws 510 ILCS 5/1 - 35; 510 ILCS 92/1 - 999; 510 ILCS 72/1 - 180; 55 I.L.C.S. 5/5-1071 - 1071.1; 60 I.L.C.S. 1/30-110; 520 I.L.C.S. 20/15 and 20/19; 520 I.L.C.S. 5/2.34; 65 I.L.C.S. 5/11-20-9 These statutes comprise Illinois' dog laws. Among the provisions include the Animal Control Act, which regulates the licensing and control of dogs, the Diseased Animal Act, and the Humane Euthanasia in Animal Shelters Act.
IL - Dog Bite - Chapter 510. Animals 510 ILCS 5/13 This Illinois statute provides the health procedure for dog bites. When a state health administrator receives information that any person has been bitten by an animal, the administrator shall have such dog or other animal confined under the observation of a licensed veterinarian for a period of not less than 10 days. People with knowledge of dog bites are required to inform the administrator or his or her representative promptly. It is unlawful for the owner of the animal to euthanize, sell, give away, or otherwise dispose of any animal known to have bitten a person, until it is released by the administrator.
PA - Ordinances - § 23144. To tax and destroy dogs 53 P.S. § 23144 This briefly worded Pennsylvania statute presumably gives municipalities the authority "[t]o regulate and provide for taxing the owners and harborers of dogs, and to destroy dogs found at large contrary to any ordinance."
PA - Ordinances - § 66530. Regulation of dogs 53 P.S. § 66530 - 66531 This Pennsylvania statute provides that the board of supervisors may by ordinance prohibit and regulate the running at large of dogs.
DE - Pet Sales - CHAPTER 40. PET WARRANTIES 6 Del.C. § 4001 - 4011 This Delaware statutory section comprises the state's "pet warranty" laws. Purchasers receive a statement of the dog's breed and any registration information when buying pets from a retail pet store under the law. Sellers are required to disclose any known disease or illness at the time of sale. Further, sellers must provide the following written statement when selling a registered pet: "A pedigree or a registration does not assure proper breeding condition, health, quality or claims to lineage." Buyers may receive a refund or replacement, or have veterinary expenses reimbursed by a seller where a dog becomes ill or dies within 20 days of purchase (or within two years for a congenital disorder).
IL - Restaurant - 5/11-20-14. Companion dogs; restaurants 65 ILCS 5/11-20-14 This law provides that a municipality with a population of 1,000,000 or more may, by ordinance, authorize the presence of companion dogs in outdoor areas of restaurants where food is served, if the ordinance provides for adequate controls to ensure compliance with other Illinois health laws. An ordinance enacted under this Section shall provide that: (i) no companion dog shall be present in the interior of any restaurant or in any area where food is prepared; and (ii) the restaurant shall have the right to refuse to serve the owner of a companion dog if the owner fails to exercise reasonable control over the companion dog or the companion dog is otherwise behaving in a manner that compromises or threatens to compromise the health or safety of any person present in the restaurant. Under this law, "companion dog" means a dog other than one who is assisting a person with disability.
DE - Ordinances - Local ordinances (dogs) 7 Del.C. § 1740 - Repealed by 77 Laws 2010, ch. 428, § 5, eff. July 1, 2010 [Repealed in 20210]. This Delaware statutes provides that nothing shall prevent a local municipality from enacting measures or a program for the control of dangerous or potentially dangerous dogs.
ME - Impound -Chapter 719. Uncontrolled Dogs. 7 M. R. S. A. § 3912 This Maine statute provides that an animal control officer shall seize, impound, or restrain a loose dog. If ownership is unknown, the dog may be delivered to the local animal shelter where it can be treated as a stray. If ownership is known, the officer must either deliver it to the owner or take it to an animal shelter.
ME - Exotic Pets - Chapter 723. Facility Licenses. 7 M. R. S. A. § 3931-B (§ 3931-B. Repealed. Laws 2011, c. 100, § 13, eff. May 19, 2011) REPEALED: This Maine statute outlines the requirements that apply to wolf hybrid kennels. A person who operates a wolf hybrid kennel must register with the department. The offspring of a wolf hybrid must be permanently identified prior to transferring ownership or care of the animal. Failure to comply with the provisions of this section results in a civil violation with a forfeiture not to exceed $1,000. (For other exotic pet laws in Maine, see Chapter 730-A. Breeding, Sale and Transportation of Small Mammals).
ME - Dog, Dangerous - Maine Dangerous Dog Laws 7 M. R. S. A. § 3951 - 3955; 7 M. R. S. A. § 3961 - 3964; 7 M. R. S. A. § 3907 This Maine statutory sections outlines the state's dangerous dog laws. It first provides that any person may lawfully kill a dog if necessary to protect that person, another person or a domesticated animal during the course of a sudden, unprovoked assault. A person who owns or keeps a dangerous dog commits a civil violation for which the court shall adjudge a fine of not less than $250 and not more than $1,000. The dog may be ordered to be muzzled, or euthanized if it has killed, maimed or inflicted serious bodily injury upon a person or has a history of a prior assault. Notably, if a dog whose owner refuses or neglects to comply with the order wounds any person by a sudden assault or wounds or kills any domestic animal, the owner shall pay the person injured treble damages and costs to be recovered by a civil action. The statute sets out the specific procedure for declaring a dog dangerous and the statutory definition of dangerous is also provided by reference to a companion statute.
ME - Dogs - Consolidated Dog Laws 7 M.R.S.A.§ 3901 - 4163; 12 M.R.S.A. § 11111; 12 M.R.S.A. § 11228; 12 M.R.S.A. § 11302; 12 M.R.S.A. § 11951; 12 M.R.S.A. § 12051 - 12055; 12 M.R.S.A. § 12404; 17-A M.R.S.A. § 752-B; 17 M.R.S.A. § 1044; These Maine statutes comprise the state's dog laws. Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws that determine the disposition of loose or dangerous dogs, and a chapter on the sale of dogs.
IL - Dog Fighting - Chapter 720. Criminal Offenses 720 I.L.C.S. 5/48-1 The following statute comprises Illinois' dogfighting law. Under the law, it is a felony to promote or instigate a fight, or to train or sell a dog for dogfighting purposes. Further, no person may solicit a minor to violate this Section. Providing equipment or aiding in providing equipment for a fight is also a felony. Knowingly attending a dogfight is a Class 4 felony for a first violation. A second or subsequent violation of subsection (g) of this Section is a Class 3 felony.
PA - Pet Sales - § 201-9.3. Dog purchaser protection 73 P.S. § 201-9.3 This Pennsylvania statute comprises the state's Dog Purchaser Protection law. The law mandates disclosure of a dog's health history by a seller (defined as pet shop operator or other individual who sells dogs to the public and who owns or operates a kennel or pet shop licensed by the Pennsylvania Department of Agriculture or the United States Department of Agriculture). If, within ten days after the date of purchase, a dog purchased from a seller is determined, through physical examination, diagnostic tests or necropsy by a veterinarian, to be clinically ill or dies from any contagious or infectious illness or any parasitic illness which renders it unfit for purchase or results in its death, the purchaser may exercise one of the described statutory elections.
OK - Leash - § 2217. Public access and use of state parks--Prohibitions (dog leash) 74 Okl.St.Ann. § 2217 No person may enter a state park with a dog, unless the dog is on a leash, or permit any dog to enter a state park or recreation area under the jurisdiction of the Commission. It is further provided that any authorized member of the Department or any authorized employee of the Oklahoma Department of Wildlife Conservation may kill any vicious dog found running loose in any state park which poses imminent threat to humans or other animals, or which may be chasing or running any game in the state park. Any such authorized employees of the Departments shall not be held liable for the killing of said dog.
IL - Service Animal - Chapter 740. Civil Liabilities. 740 I.L.C.S. 13/1 - 10 Under this Illinois statute, a physically impaired person may bring an action for both economic and noneconomic damages against a person who steals, injures, or attacks his or her assistance animal with hazardous chemicals (provided he or she reasonably knew the guide dog was present and the chemical was hazardous). The economic damages recoverable include veterinary medical expenses, replacement costs, and temporary replacement assistance (provided by person or animal). No cause of action lies where the physically impaired person was committing a civil or criminal trespass at the time of the attack or theft.
AZ - Pet Sales - Title 44. Trade and Commerce. Chapter 11. Regulations Concerning Particular Businesses. A. R. S. 44-1799 - 1799.11 This Arizona statutory section comprises the state's pet shop laws. The section requires that retail pet sellers provide purchasers a notice of rights that includes a statement of good health signed by a veterinarian. Purchasers have fifteen days to return unhealthy or diseased dogs and receive a refund or compensation for reasonable veterinary expenses.
AZ - Dog - Arizona Consolidated Dog Laws A. R. S. § 11-1001 - 1029; § 28-2422 - 2422.02; § 17-309 These Arizona statutes comprise the laws relating to dogs and animal bites. Included are provisions related to registration, collaring, and vaccination of dogs. With regard to dangerous dogs, Arizona law provides that a person with knowledge of a dog's vicious propensity must also keep the dog in an enclosed yard or confined area with a sign indicating the dog's vicious tendencies.
AZ - Dog Ordinances - Powers and duties of board of supervisors (dogs/animals) A. R. S. § 11-1005 This Arizona statute provides that each county board of supervisors may regulate dogs, including the designation of a county enforcement agent, contracting with any city or town to enforce the provisions of any ordinance enacted by such city or town for the control of dogs, and for the unincorporated areas of the county, by ordinance, regulate, restrain and prohibit the running at large of dogs and the excessive and unrestrained barking of dogs. They may also establish either civil or criminal penalties for violations of the above ordinances and establish a rabies quarantine zone.
AZ - Assistance Animal - Arizona's Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws A. R. S. § 11-1008; § 11-1024, § 13-2910; § 9-500.32 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and service animal laws.
AZ - Leash Laws - Article 6. Animal Control. A. R. S. § 11-1012 This Arizona laws provides generally that no female dog in her breeding season or vicious dog may be allowed to go at large. It further delineates the state's leash requirements for dogs, including during times of rabies quarantines, in state parks, and at public schools. Exceptions under the law include the training of livestock dogs and hunting dogs, among others.
AZ - License and Vaccination Ordinances - Exemption of cities, towns and counties (dogs/animals) A. R. S. § 11-1018 This Arizona statute exempts cities or towns from the provisions of this article if they impose a license fee and vaccination on dogs by ordinance, provided that such ordinance is equal to or more stringent than the provisions of this article. Further, the provisions of this article shall not apply to counties which regulate the running at large of dogs in the unincorporated areas of the county by ordinance provided that such ordinance is equal to or more stringent than the provisions of this article.
AZ - Ordinances - Lawful presence on private property defined (dogs) A. R. S. § 11-1026 This Arizona statute provides that a person is lawfully on a dog owner's property when he or she is there as an invitee or guest, or when in the performance of a duty imposed upon him by law of the state or United States, or by ordinances of a municipality in which such property is located.
AZ - Ordinances - Article 2. Board of Trustees Government After Disincorporation. A. R. S. § 9-219 (repealed 2017) §§ 9-211 to 9-226. Repealed by Laws 2016, Ch. 62, § 9, eff. Jan. 1, 2017 (related to powers of the board of trustees)
AK - Assistance Animal - Alaska's Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws A. S. § 09.65.150; 11.76.130; 11.76.133, 28.23.120 The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.
AR - Ordinances - § 14-16-701. River and improvement district A.C.A. § 14-16-701 This Arkansas statute provides that, upon the written request of the governing body of a suburban improvement district (as defined by statute), a county may by ordinance control and regulate dogs and cats within all or any part of the suburban improvement district. This statute does not elaborate on the confines of such ordinances, so it is assumed the subject matter is constrained only through preemption.
AR - Ordinances - § 14-54-1102. Dogs running astray. A.C.A. § 14-54-1102 This Arkansas statute provides that municipal corporations have the power to prevent the running at large of dogs and the injuries and annoyances associated with them. Further, this statute allows municipalities to authorize the destruction or impoundment of dogs if found in violation of ordinance. However, prior to destroying the dog, the municipality shall give the dog's owner at least five (5) days' notice of the date of the proposed destruction of the dog by certified mail if the dog carries the owner's address.
AR - Emergency - § 20-13-217. Gabo's Law--Police dogs--Injured on duty A.C.A. § 20-13-217 This section shall be known and may be cited as “Gabo's Law." An emergency medical services personnel or an emergency medical services provider may transport a police dog injured in the course of a law enforcement or correctional agency's work to a veterinary hospital or clinic if there is not a person requiring immediate medical attention or transport at the time.
AR - Assistance Animal - Arkansas Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws A.C.A. § 20-14-301 to 311; A.C.A. § 23-13-717; A.C.A. § 20-14-1001 - 1004 The following statute comprises the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog law.
AR - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws A.C.A. § 20-19-101 to 408; § 2-40-110; § 15-41-113; § 15-42-303; § 5-54-126 These Arkansas statutes comprise the state's dog laws. Among the provisions including licensing laws, rabies control, and mandatory sterilization laws. Also contained is the state's Wolf-Hybrid statutory section.
AR - Exotic Pets - Subchapter 4. Ownership and Breeding of Wolves and Wolf-Dog Hybrids A.C.A. § 20-19-401 - 408 This chapter of Arkansas laws concerns the regulation of wolves and wolf-dog hybrids kept as companion animals. Under the law, a "wolf-dog hybrid” means any animal which is publicly acknowledged by its owner as being the offspring of a wolf and domestic dog; however, no animal may be judged to be a wolf or wolf-dog hybrid based strictly on its appearance. The specific rabies vaccination requirements for wolf-dog hybrids are detailed as well as confinement requirements (i.e, specific fence dimensions). If a wolf or wolf-dog hybrid bites a person or injures or destroys another animal while out of its confined area, the person responsible for the adequate confinement of the animal upon conviction shall be guilty of a Class A misdemeanor.
AR - Racing - Arkansas Greyhound Racing Law A.C.A. §§ 23-111-101 to 23-111-518 This Act gives the Arkansas Racing Commission sole jurisdiction over the business and the sport of greyhound racing. Greyhound racing may only be conducted in the State of Arkansas by a franchise that is approved by the Arkansas Racing Commission. A franchise must be a corporation organized under the state of Arkansas. A franchise may not be a individual, partnerships, associations, or trusts. A franchise may not be granted by the Commission until it is authorized by a majority of the qualified electors within the county in which the franchise intends to operate. The voters will be able to choose whether to allow or reject the Racing Commission's grant to the franchise to conduct greyhound racing. Each county is only allowed to have one franchise conducting greyhound racing.
AR - Pet Sales - Chapter 97. Retail Pet Stores. A.C.A. §§ 4-97-101 to 109 This statutory section comprises the Arkansas Retail Pet Store Consumer Protection Act of 1991. The purpose of the act is to ensure that purchasers receive consumer animals that are physically and temperamentally sound, healthy, and fit as companions. The Act also provides a means by which the acquisition and care of those animals can be monitored.
AZ - Municipalities - Dog Regulations A.R.S. § 9-240 This Arizona statute allows common councils to regulate dogs running at large.
AL - Fur - § 13A-11-241. Cruelty in first and second degrees (dog/cat fur provision) Ala. Code 1975 § 13A-11-241 In Alabama, a person commits the crime of cruelty to a dog or cat in the first degree if he or she skins a domestic dog or cat or offers for sale or exchange or offers to buy or exchange the fur, hide, or pelt of a domestic dog or cat. Cruelty to a dog or cat in the first degree is a Class C felony.
AL - Dog - Consolidated Dog Laws Ala. Code 1975 § 3-1-1 - 29; § 3-6-1 - 4; § 3-6A-1 - 8; § 3-7A-1 - 16; § 3-8-1; § 9-11-305 - 307; § 9-11-238; § 45-37A-53.01 These statutes comprise Alabama's relevant dog laws. Included among the provisions are licensing requirements, dangerous dog provisions, and the chapter on rabies.
AL - Dog Bite/Dangerous Animal - Liability of Owners of Dogs Biting or Injuring Persons. Ala. Code 1975 § 3-1-1 - 6; § 3-6-1 - 4; Ala.Code 1975 § 3-6A-1 - 8; § 3-7A-9 These Alabama statutes outline the state's dog bite law. The law first provides that, when any person owns or keeps a vicious or dangerous animal of any kind and, as a result of his or her careless management or allowing the dog to go at liberty, and another person, without fault is injured, such owner shall be liable in damages for such injury. If any dog shall, without provocation, bite or injure any person who is at the time at a place where he or she has a legal right to be, the owner of such dog shall be liable in damages to the person so bitten or injured. This apparent strict liability has a mitigation provision that states that the owner of such dog shall be entitled to plead and prove in mitigation of damages that he had no knowledge of any circumstances indicating such dog to be or to have been vicious or dangerous. If an owner, however, is aware that his or her dog is rabid at the time of the bite, he or she shall be liable for twice the damages sustained.
AL - Dog Fighting - Activities relating to fighting of dogs prohibited; violations; confiscation; Ala. Code 1975 § 3-1-29 This Alabama statute constitutes the state's dogfighting law. Under the law, it is a class C felony for any person to own, possess, keep or train any dog with the intent that such dog shall be engaged in an exhibition of fighting with another dog; for amusement or gain, to cause any dog to fight with another dog, or cause any dogs to injure each other; or to permit any of the above acts. The law also makes it a class C felony to knowingly be present or be a spectator at dogfights.
AL - Impound - Maintenance of pound; notice of impoundment; adoption of animals. Ala. Code 1975 § 3-7A-7 This Alabama statute provides that it is the duty of each and every county in the state to provide a suitable county pound and impounding officer for the impoundment of dogs, cats, and ferrets found running at large in violation of the provisions of this chapter. When dogs and cats are impounded and if the owner thereof is known, such owner shall be given direct notice of the impoundment of said animal or animals belonging to him; or the impounding officer may make said animal or animals available for adoption after a period of not less than seven days.
AL - Impound - Destruction of impounded dogs and cats Ala. Code 1975 § 3-7A-8 This Alabama statute provides that all dogs, cats, and ferrets which have been impounded for lack of rabies immunization, after due notice has been given to the owner as provided in Section 3-7A-7, may be humanely destroyed and disposed of when not redeemed by the owner within seven days. The owner may redeem the animal before destruction by paying the associated costs of vaccination (if no proof of prior vaccination) and impoundment.
AL - Sterilization - Chapter 9. Sterilization of Dogs and Cats. Ala. Code 1975 § 3-9-1 to 4 These statutes require animal shelters, animal control agencies, and humane societies to sterilize dogs and cats acquired from other animal shelters, animal control agencies, and humane societies. For purposes of this statute, the term "sterilization" refers to the surgical removal of the reproductive organs of a dog or cat in order to render the animal unable to reproduce. Adoptive animals must be sterilized by a licensed veterinarian before the animal is released to the new owner, or the new owner must enter into a written agreement with the facility certifying that sterilization will be performed by a licensed veterinarian within 30 days after acquisition of the animal or within 30 days of the sexual maturity of the animal.
AL - Dog - Chapter 49. Mobile County Dog Laws Ala. Code 1975 § 45-49-170.20 - .28; Ala.Code 1975 § 45-49-231 These are laws specific to Mobile County in Alabama. The first set of laws concern the regulation of dangerous or nuisance dogs in the county. An animal control officer or law enforcement officer of Mobile County shall investigate any incidents involving any dog reported to be dangerous or a nuisance in the unincorporated areas of Mobile County. If there is probable cause to believe that an owned dog is dangerous or a nuisance and has caused serious physical injury or has caused damage to real or personal property, the law enforcement officer or animal control officer shall impound the dog pending disposition of a petition to declare a dog to be dangerous or a nuisance. The next law (§ 45-49-231) concerns theft of dogs in the county. Any person who picks up a dog wearing a collar and name plate bearing the name and address of the owner of the dog shall make contact with the owner and deliver the dog to the owner, or return the dog to the place where the dog was picked up. If the person fails to carry out this section, he or she shall be subject to arrest and prosecution for the crime of theft as provided in Chapter 8 of Title 13A.
AL - Leash - When dogs permitted in areas; liability of owners of dogs at large in areas (wildlife management areas) Ala. Code 1975 § 9-11-305 - 307 This Alabama statute provides that no dog shall be permitted except on leash within any wildlife management area except in accordance with the rules and regulations promulgated by the Commissioner of Conservation and Natural Resources. The owner of any dog at large within any wildlife management area shall be guilty of a misdemeanor.

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