New York

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New York Revised Statutes 1874: Chapter 12: Sections 1-8 Chapter 12, entitled "An act relating to animals," concerns New York's Law about the treatment of animals from 1874.
New York Revised Statutes 1867: Chapter 375: Sections 1-10 Chapter 375, entitled "An act for the more effectual prevention of animal cruelty," concerns New York's law on animal treatment for 1867.
New York Revised Statutes 1866: Chapter 783: Sections 1-10 Chapter 783, entitled "An act for the more effectual prevention of animal cruelty," concerns New York's Law on animal treatment for 1866.
New York Revised Statutes 1829: Title 6: Section 26 The law contained in Title 6, Section 26 of the New York Revised Statutes of 1829 concerns the offense of maliciously killing an animal of another. The statute describes the type of animals covered and the punishment for killing, wounding, or maiming such an animal. In addition, the statute also states the punishment for the offense of cruelty to animals.
New York Revised Statute 1881: Chapter 682: Section 26 Section 26 of Chapter 682 from New York Revised Statutes 1881 concerns the treatment of animals by the owner or any other person. A person found harming such an animal would be guilty of a misdemeanor.
New York Penal Law 1866: Chapter 682: Section 2 Chapter 682 from New York Penal Law of 1866 covers cruelty to animals. Section 2 from this chapter describes the offense entitled neglect of disabled animals. The law states the penalty for leaving a disabled or diseased animal to die on any state or city land.
New York Consolidated Laws 1938: Sections 180-196 Article 16, entitled "Animals", concerns New York's Law about the treatment of animals from 1938. The act covers such topics as poisoning of animals to abandoning diseased or injured animals. In addition, the act provides definitions in section 180.
New York Consolidated Laws 1909: Sections 180-196 Article 16, entitled "Animals," concerns New York's Law about the treatment of animals from 1909. The act covers such topics as the keeping of animals for fighting to abandoning diseased or injured animals. In addition, the act provides definitions in section 180 for important words such as animal and torture.
Motta v. Menendez


This New York case arose following an incident that occurred on December 13, 2003, in which the appellant's two pit bull terriers entered the petitioner's property, and one of appellant's dogs ("Duke") attacked and injured the petitioner's pet dog. Following a special proceeding, the lower court determined that appellant's pit bull terrier named “Duke” was a dangerous dog and directed that it be destroyed. On appeal, the Supreme Court, Appellate Division found that the dangerous dog statute in effect on December 13, 2003, did not provide that one dog attacking another was conduct subject to the penalty of destruction (Agriculture and Markets Law former §§ 108, 121).

Mongelli v. Cabral


A couple boarded their pet bird with a couple who groomed and boarded birds while the wife underwent extensive medical treatment.  There was a dispute between the owners and the boarders over whether the bird was a gift or the subject of long-term boarding.  The court found that the boarders had not established that the bird had been a gift.

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