Connecticut

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Connecticut v. Devon D. Devon D. was convicted of four counts sexual assault and three counts of risk of injury to a child upon allegations made by three of Devon D.’s biological children, C1, C2, and C3. He appealed his conviction on the grounds that the trial court had abused its discretion by having the three cases to be tried jointly and by permitting C1 to testify with a dog at her feet. The appellate court had accepted these arguments and reversed and remanded for a new trial, but the Supreme Court of Connecticut reversed the appellate court. The Connecticut Supreme Court concluded that “the trial court properly exercised its discretion in permitting the cases to be tried together because the evidence in all three cases was cross admissible,” and reversed on that issue. As to the appellate court’s determination that the trial court had abused its discretion in permitting a dog to sit near C1 during her testimony to provide comfort and support,” the Supreme Court also reversed, reinstating the verdict and judgment of the trial court.
Connecticut General Statutes: Title 56: Sections 6480 - 6482n


Sections 6480-6482 of Title 56 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers offences against public policy.  Specifically, the statutes cover following topics: animal fighting, penalty for attending a fight, and unlawful exhibition of sports for gain.

Connecticut General Statutes: Chapter 338: Section 6619


Section 6619 of Chapter 338 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers information, procedure and bail. Specifically, the statute states the circumstances for reach a search warrant will be issued.

Connecticut General Statutes: Chapter 333: Sections 6402-6405


Sections 6402-6405 of Chapter 333 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers offences against humanity and morality .  Specifically, the statutes cover following topics: animal cruelty, transportation of animals, and docking of horses.

Connecticut General Statutes: Chapter 331: Section 6367


Section 6367 of Chapter 329 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers the transportation of wild animals.  Specifically, the statute establishes the duty of care that must be given to the public when transporting a wild animal.

Connecticut General Statutes 1918: Chapter 96: Sections 1879-1886


Sections 1879-1886 of Chapter 96 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers in general the Humane Society for Connecticut.  Specifically, the sections cover the following topics: the powers of an agent from the society, the definition of an animal, and funding of the society.

Connecticut General Statutes 1918: Chapter 337: Section 6546


Section 6546 of Chapter 337 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers jurisdiction and powers of courts. Specifically, the statute states the power of the court to issue search warrants for animal cruelty. 

Connecticut General Statutes 1918: Chapter 329: Section 6268


Section 6268 of Chapter 329 from the 1918 General Laws of Connecticut covers the unlawful injury to certain property of another.  Specifically, the statute states the punishment for hurting, maiming, poisoning anther's cattle, ox, horse, and mule.

Connecticut General Statutes 1902: Sections 2807-2816


The 1902 General Statutes of Connecticut sections 2807-2816 cover the following topics: definition of an animal, powers of an agent from humane society, and funding of the humane society.

Carrasquillo v. Carlson


A Connecticut motorist brought a negligence action against a dog owner, seeking to recover for personal injuries allegedly sustained when he took evasive action to avoid hitting dog.  The Superior Court, Judicial District of Waterbury, granted the dog owner's motion for summary judgment. On appeal, the Appellate Court held that the record was adequate for appellate review; the dog owner exercised reasonable control while walking dog; the statute allowing imposition of fine or imprisonment or both on owner of dog that interferes with motor vehicle did not apply; and the dog owner demonstrated that motorist would be unable to cure legal defects in complaint even if permitted to replead.

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