Displaying 31 - 40 of 76
Titlesort ascending Summary
CT - Pet Trust - Chapter 802C. Trusts

Connecticut enacted its "pet trust" law in 2009. Under the law, a testamentary or inter vivos trust may be created to provide for the care of an animal or animals alive during the settlor's or testator's lifetime. The trust terminates when the last surviving animal named in the trust dies. The trust must designate a "trust protector" who acts on behalf of the animals named in the trust.

CT - Oxford - Title IX: General Regulations (Chapter 92: Right to Farm)

According to Oxford, Connecticut's Right to Farm ordinances, quoting Conn. Gen. Stat. § 19a-341, an agricultural or farming operation shall not be deemed a public or private nuisance due to odor emanating from livestock or manure, or due to water pollution caused by livestock. Under these ordinances, a landowner or agent who fails to disclose that a buyer or tenant is about to acquire or occupy property in a town where farming activities occur shall be fined $100. These ordinances also contain exceptions to the nuisance provision, as well as provide a resolution process for any person who seeks to complain about a farm’s operations.  

CT - Municipalities - Power to Regulate This Connecticut statute allows municipalities to prohibit dogs running at large and to prevet animal cruelty; this statute also prohibts municipalities from adopting breed specific legislation.
CT - Lost Property - Chapter 859. Lost and Unclaimed Property.

This statutory section comprises Connecticut's lost property statutes.

CT - Lien, care - § 49-70. Lien on animals for their keep. Transfer of abandoned animals

This Connecticut law provides that when a special agreement has been made between the owner of any animals and a person keeping/taking care of such animals for a price, those animals are subject to a lien in favor of the person keeping the animals. The person keeping those animals may detain the animals until the debt is paid. If the debt is not paid with 30 days after it becomes due, the keeper may sell the animals at public auction after he or she gives written notice to the owner of the time and place at least six days before the sale. Additionally, a commercial boarding kennel or veterinary hospital may transfer abandoned animals to a nonprofit animal rescue or adoption organization. An animal is considered abandoned if the owner or keeper of such animal fails to retrieve the animal within five days of the date on which such owner or keeper was scheduled to retrieve the animal. Written notice notice sent certified, return-receipt requested must first be sent to the owner with a ten-day waiting period before the transfer can occur.

CT - Leash - Control of dogs in proximity to guide dogs.

This Connecticut law provides that the owner or keeper of a dog shall restrain and control such dog on a leash when such dog is not on the property of its owner or keeper and is in proximity to a blind, deaf or mobility impaired person accompanied by his or her guide dog.  Any person who violates the provisions of this section shall have committed an infraction. If an owner or keeper of a dog violates the provisions of this section and, as a result of such violation, such dog attacks and injures the guide dog, such owner or keeper shall be liable for any damage done to such guide dog, including veterinary care, replacement of the dog, and attorney fees.

CT - Kennels - Operations and Maintenance of Commercial Kennels

This set of Connecticut regulations concerns the keeping of dogs in commercial kennel facilities. The regulations cover the maintenance of kennel facilities, including pens, lighting, watering, feeding, ventilation, temperature, sanitation, protection from weather, and removal of waste. The section also mandates that dogs must be segregated for health or safety reasons, and litters of puppies must be separated. Dogs must be caged individually with enough room to turn about freely and stand erect.

CT - Hunting of bald eagle prohibited - Chapter 490. Fisheries and Game

Connecticut law prohibits the harassment and killing of bald eagles. Violation of the statute can result in a fine of not more than $100 or up to thirty days in jail, or both. .

CT - Hunting - § 26-80b. Sale or use of computer software or service to remotely hunt This Connecticut law states that no person shall operate, provide, sell, use or offer to operate, provide, sell or use any computer software or service that allows a person, when not physically present, to remotely control a firearm or weapon to hunt a live animal or bird. Violation is a class A misdemeanor.
CT - Hunting - Chapter 952. Penal Code: Offenses

This statute comprises Connecticut's hunter harassment law. A person violates this section by




doing such things as driving or disturbing wildlife for the purpose of disrupting the lawful taking of wildlife; blocking, impeding, or otherwise harassing a person who is lawfully taking wildlife; using natural or artificial visual, aural, olfactory or physical stimuli to affect wildlife behavior; erecting barriers; interjecting oneself in the line of fire; or remaining on private lands without permission with the intent to violate this section. Any person who violates any provision of this section shall be guilty of a class C misdemeanor.