Connecticut

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CT - Hunting - § 26-80b. Sale or use of computer software or service to remotely hunt This Connecticut law states that no person shall operate, provide, sell, use or offer to operate, provide, sell or use any computer software or service that allows a person, when not physically present, to remotely control a firearm or weapon to hunt a live animal or bird. Violation is a class A misdemeanor.
CT - Hunting - Chapter 952. Penal Code: Offenses


This statute comprises Connecticut's hunter harassment law. A person violates this section by

intentionally

or

knowingly

doing such things as driving or disturbing wildlife for the purpose of disrupting the lawful taking of wildlife; blocking, impeding, or otherwise harassing a person who is lawfully taking wildlife; using natural or artificial visual, aural, olfactory or physical stimuli to affect wildlife behavior; erecting barriers; interjecting oneself in the line of fire; or remaining on private lands without permission with the intent to violate this section. Any person who violates any provision of this section shall be guilty of a class C misdemeanor.

CT - Horse Meat - § 21a-22. Sale of equine meat in public eating places


This Connecticut law states that a public eating place shall not sell or offer equine meat without without indicating such contents of each item in print. Any person, or the responsible agent of any firm or corporation, who violates any provision of this section shall be fined not more than $1,000 or imprisoned not more than 1 year or both.

CT - Horse - § 22-415. Inhumane transportation of equines. Penalty. Regulations This Connecticut law makes it unlawful to carry any equine in an unnecessarily cruel or inhumane manner, or in a way and manner which might endanger the equine or knowingly and wilfully authorizes or permits such equine to be subjected to unnecessary torture, suffering or cruelty of any kind. Violation results in a fine of not less than one hundred dollars or more than five hundred dollars. [Also see the administrative regulations at https://www.animallaw.info/administrative/connecticut-equines-transportation-equines].
CT - Fisheries & Wildlife - Chapter 490. Fisheries and Game. § 26-1. Definitions


Definitions for the Connecticut Statute for Fisheries and Wildlife

CT - Feral Cats - § 22-339d. Municipal control of feral cats


This Connecticut statute permits municipalities to adopt ordinances requiring registration of feral cat "keepers," defined as anyone who harbors or regularly feeds a feral cat.   If a municipality enacts such an ordinance, the ordinance must require the keeper to sterilize the cat and have it vaccinated against rabies.  The statute also enables municipalities to adopt ordinances holding cat owners and keepers responsible if their cats cause significant property damage or severe health violations.

CT - Exotic Pets - § 26-40a. Possession of potentially dangerous animal; Chapter 490. Fisheries and Game


These Connecticut states reflect the state's laws on the keeping of wild animals. Under § 26-40a, no person shall possess a potentially dangerous animal, which includes wildlife such as the  lion, leopard, cheetah, jaguar, ocelot, jaguarundi cat, puma, lynx, bobcat, wolf, coyote, all species of bears, gorilla, chimpanzee and orangutan. The Department of Environmental Protection shall issue a bill to the owner or person in illegal possession of such potentially dangerous animal for all costs of seizure, care, maintenance, relocation or disposal of such animal. Additionally, any person who violates any provision of this section shall be assessed a civil penalty not to exceed $2000, and is guilty of a class A misdemeanor. Under § 26-55, no person shall import or introduce into the state, possess or let loose, any live fish, wild bird, wild mammal, reptile, amphibian or invertebrate unless such person has obtained a permit. Again, a violator is responsible for expenses from the seizure, maintenance, and relocation of the illegally imported animal. The penalty includes a civil fine up to $1000 and results in a class C misdemeanor.

CT - Exotic Animals - Sec. 26-54-1. Wildlife pen specifications


Connecticut regulation 26-54-1 gives the wildlife pen specifications for any bird or quadruped possessed under the provisions of section 26-54 or 26-55 of the General Statutes. In addition, Sec. 26-55-6 replaced 26-55-2 in 2012 (the rule on quadruped importation). Sec. 22-55-6 now divides animals into Categories 1 - 4 based on the dangerousness of the animal to people, whether it is an endangered or threatened species, and even the risk it poses to and the native environment. The rule then states that no person except certain entities like zoos, museums, USDA licensed exhibitors, and research facilities may possess Category One Wild Animals. Restrictions are also imposed on other categories of animals. The rule also details the grandfathering process for owning a primate that weighs less than 35 lbs.

CT - Exotic - Sec. 26-55-6. Importation, possession or liberation of wild birds, mammals, reptiles, amphibians and invertebrates


This new Connecticut regulation (effective March 1, 2012) places restrictions on who may import or possess certain categories of wild animals in the state. The regulation puts wild animals into one of four categories: Category One, Two, Three, or Four Wild Animals. With regard to Great Apes, a member within the family Hominidae (including, but not limited to, gorilla, chimpanzee and orangutan) is a Category One Animal. No person, except a municipal park, zoo, public nonprofit aquarium, nature center,museum, exhibitor licensed or registered with the United States Department of Agriculture, laboratory registered with the United States Department of Agriculture, or research facility registered with the United States Department of Agriculture, shall import or possess any Category One Wild Animal.

CT - Equines - Transportation of Equines


These Connecticut regulations provide the requirements for transporting equines. Under the regulations, the use of double deck or possum belly vehicles to transport horses is strictly prohibited.

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