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Title Citation Alternate Citation Summary Type
Canada - Ontario - Ontario Statutes - Animals for Research Act R.S.O. 1990, c. A.22 s.1 -

This set of laws comprises the Ontario Animals for Research Act. The law requires an operator to be licenced; the licence may be revoked or suspended where, among other things, the operator commits animal cruelty or neglect. Research facilities under this act are also subject to registration. Notably, the Act provides that every animal used in a registered research facility in any experiment that is likely to result in pain to the animal shall be anaesthetized so as to prevent the animal from suffering unnecessary pain. Further, the operator of a research facility shall provide analgesics adequate to prevent an animal from suffering unnecessary pain during the period of its recovery from any procedure used in an experiment.

Statute
Canada - Alberta - Service Dogs Act S.A. 2007, c. S-7.5

This Alberta, Canada law provides that no person shall deny to any person the accommodation, services or facilities available in any place to which the public is customarily admitted, or discriminate against any person for the reason that the person is a disabled person accompanied by a service dog or a certified dog-trainer accompanied by a dog in training. The law goes into effect January of 2009.

Statute
McAllister v. Wiegand 2009CarswellOnt189

The plaintiff, a 55-year old woman and recent acquaintance of the defendants, was bitten on the cheek by the defendant's bull mastiff dog, resulting in a spreading infection and loss of all her teeth. The plaintiff was an invited guest in the defendant's home where she had been on 3-4 prior occasions. There was a question over whether the incident arose when the plaintiff startled the dog from sleep by petting it while bending over it, or whether the dog had just awakened when it was petted and bit her. The court found that dog and plaintiff were familiar with each other and there was nothing provocative that should have caused the dog to retaliate. Thus according to Ontario's Dog Owner Liability Act, where owners are strictly or absolutely liable for their dogs' injuries to others, the defendants were strictly liable to the plaintiff for her injuries.

Case
Canada - P.E.I. Statutes - Companion Animal Protection Act S.P.E.I. 2001, c. 4, s. 1 -

This set of laws comprises the Prince Edward Island (PEI) Companion Animal Protection Act. The object of this Act is to protect companion animals from abuse and neglect and to license and regulate the activities of companion animal establishments. Under the Act, no person shall wilfully cause a companion animal unnecessary pain, suffering or injury or permit it to be in distress. Any companion animal that is at large and or appears to be in distress may be caught and taken possession of by a person who is not the owner of the companion animal. Every person who fails to comply with this Act or the regulations is guilty of an offence and liable on summary conviction to a fine of not less than $200 and not more than $5,000.

Statute
Canada - British Columbia - Prevention of Cruelty to Animals Act R.S.B.C. 1996, c. 372, s. 1 - 26(4)

This set of British Columbia, Canada laws establishes the guidelines for establishment of individual chapters of The British Columbia Society for the Prevention of Cruelty to Animals. The laws allow these societies to relieve animals in "distress" as defined by law. A person who wilfully or knowingly interferes with or obstructs a person in the discharge of duties or the exercise of powers under this Act commits an offence punishable by a fine of not more than $2 000 or to imprisonment for not more than 6 months, or to both.

Statute
Xu v. Chen 2008 CarswellBC 1693 2008 BCPC 234

The Claimant's six-month old sheltie puppy, "Diamond,” suffered a serious limb injury outside the front yard of the family home. Claimant seeks to recover the veterinarian costs she incurred to treat the dog's injury against Defendants, the owners of the other dog that allegedly attacked claimant’s dog. The court found that there was evidence that Defendant was previously contacted by Animal Control as well as a neighbor about an incident where Angus lunged at another dog. The Claimant has established, on a balance of probabilities, that Angus had manifested a propensity to cause the type of harm occasioned that night. Claimant was 25% liable for the incident where she left Diamond in an unfenced yard that gave other dogs access. The court denied Xu’s claim of $5500 for future medical costs for the care of Diamond because there was no evidence what these would be and the dog was currently living with another family.

Case
Canada - Saskatchewan - Dangerous Dog Law SS 2005, c M-36.1, 374-380

This set of Saskatchewan, Canada laws comprises the Dangerous Dog laws.

Statute
Canada - Manitoba Statutes. The Animal Care Act S.M. 1996, c. 69 [C.C.S.M., A84]

The Manitoba Animal Care Act sets out the requirements for animals in an owner's care. The Act allows animal protection officers to assist animals in distress. A person who contravenes any provision of this Act is guilty of an offence and is liable to a fine of not more than $5,000. for a first offence and not more than $10,000. for a subsequent offence, or to imprisonment for a term of not more than six months, or both.

Statute
Ferguson v. Birchmount Boarding Kennels Ltd. 2006 CarswellOnt 399 207 O.A.C. 98, 79 O.R. (3d) 681

In August 2002, plaintiffs’ dog escaped while being exercised at defendant-kennel’s boarding facility. Birchmount appeals from the judgment claiming the court applied the wrong standard of care, and that the court erred in law in awarding the plaintiffs damages for pain and suffering. The reviewing court found that the evidence would likely have led to the same conclusion regardless of whether a “bailment” standard was used. Further, this court was satisfied that the trial judge did not err in law or in fact in making findings and in awarding general damages where there was evidence that the plaintiffs experienced pain and suffering upon learning of the dog’s escape.

Case
Canada - Saskatchewan - The Animal Protection Act S.S. 1999, c. A-21.1, s. 1 - 28

This set of laws comprises the Saskatchewan Animal Protection Act. Under the Act, no person responsible for an animal shall cause or permit the animal to be or to continue to be in distress. The Act also outlines the powers of humane societies to rescue animals in distress and then sell, give away, or euthanize such animals if the owners cannot be located. A person who contravenes the Act is guilty of an offence with a fine of not more than $25,000, to imprisonment for not more than two months or to both for a first offence;  Further, in addition to any other penalty imposed, if a person responsible for an animal is found guilty, the court may make an order prohibiting that person from owning or having custody or control of any animal for a period specified by the court. Section 20 of the Act outlines the provisions relating to damage or injury done by dogs.

Statute

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