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Titlesort descending Author Citation Alternate Citation Summary Type
Australia -Farming - Agricultural Act This Act allows the chief executive to make standards on all matters related to agriculture, including labelling, the marking of stocks and the selling or using of hormonal growth promotants. The chief executive may also establish an advisory committee on agricultural standards. For persons whose interests are adversely affected by a decision of the chief executive under this Act or by an inspector’s decision, this act provides appeal provisions. Enforcement and penalty provisions are also included. Statute
Australia Animal Protection Law Journal This page lists the volumes of the Australian Animal Protection Law Journal. Volume 1 (2008) through Volume 9 (2013) are available at the top of page as pdf downloads. Below this list of pdf links is a list of the table of contents for each volume of the journal. The table of contents contains the names of the articles, authors, and page numbers for each journal. More information about the journal is available at the Australian Animal Protection Law Journal website at http://animalprotectionlawjournal.com/. Policy
Australia Live Export Laws Jordan Sosnowski

Brief Summary of Live Export Laws in Australia
Jordan Sosnowski (2013)

Topical Introduction
Australian Broadcasting Corporation v Lenah Game Meats Pty Ltd (2001) 208 CLR 199 (2001) 185 ALR 1; (2001) 76 ALJR 1; (2001) 22(19) Leg Rep 11; (2001) 54 IPR 161; (2001) Aust Torts Reports 81-627; [2001] HCA 63

The respondent was successful in obtaining an injunction against the appellants from publishing a film displaying possums being stunned and killed at an abattoir. The film had been obtained from a third party while trespassing. The Court found that it was not unconscionable for the appellants to publish the film and a corporation did not have a right to privacy.

Case
Australian Wool Innovation Ltd v Newkirk (No 2) [2005] FCA 1307

The respondents, including PETA, engaged in a campaign to boycott the Australian wool industry on the bases of the cruelty incurred by the practice of mulesing and because of its link to the live export industry. The applicants, including Australian Wool Innovation who represented the Australian wool industry, sought to bring an action against the respondents for hindering trade under the Trade Practices Act (Cth) s 45DB and conspiring to injure the applicants by unlawful means. The respondents were successful in having these claims struck out.

Case
Beaumont v Cahir [2004] ACTSC 97

The appellant landed a hot air balloon in a paddock occupied by a dressage horse belonging to the respondent. The horse was spooked and impaled itself on fencing. The appellant was liable for the cost of reinstating the horse to health and was not permitted to euthanise the horse and find a replacement.

Case
Brayshaw v Liosatos [2001] ACTSC 2

The appellant had informations laid against him alleging that he, as a person in charge of animals, neglected cattle 'without reasonable excuse' by failing to provide them with food. The appellant had been informed by a veterinarian that his treatment of the cattle was potentially a breach of the Animal Welfare Act 1992 (ACT) and that they were in poor condition. The evidence admitted did not rule out the possibility that the appellant's feeding of the cattle accorded with 'maintenance rations' and the convictions were overturned.

Case
Brief Summary of Whaling Tom Krepitch Animal Legal & Historical Center Early in the twentieth century, the technology used in whaling advanced so significantly that the global whale population became threatened. Efforts to decrease the number of whales killed grew after World War II and resulted in a major victory in the 1980s when commercial whaling was banned. However, this ban is still a major source of controversy as Japan continues to kill hundreds of whales each year in the Antarctic under what it calls a scientific whaling exception, but Australia labels as mere cover for a commercial whaling program. Article
City of Armidale v Kiraly [2009] WASC 199

The respondent, an owner of a brindle boxer dog, was charged with the dog attacking a person and for having the dog in a public place without a leash. The dog had escaped from the respondent's house and allegedly ran to and lunged at a lady delivering pamphlets. On appeal, the question of whether the dog's behaviour constituted an 'attack' for the purposes of the Dog Act 1976 (WA) s 33D(1) was a question of fact to be determined by the trial judge and, accordingly, the appeal was dismissed.

Case
Crump v Equine Nutrition Systems Pty Ltd t/as Horsepower [2006] NSWSC 512

The plaintiffs claimed that they purchased horse feed from the first respondent and that the feed was contaminated with monensin. The second respondent manufactured the feed. They claimed that as a result, one of their horses died and five others were permanently injured so that they could not be used for the desired purpose. After addressing several factual issues, the trial judge found for the plaintiffs in regards to the issue of negligence by the second respondent and proceeded to assess damages with regard to the economic value of the horses to the plaintiffs, the cost of replacement, loss of profits and maintenance.

Case

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