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Titlesort descending Citation Alternate Citation Agency Citation Summary Type
AK - Zoo - § 09.65.180. Civil liability of zoos AS § 09.65.180 AK ST § 09.65.180

The Alaska law provides that, except as provided in (b), a person who owns or operates a zoo is strictly liable for injury to a person or property if the injury is caused by an animal owned by or in the custody of the zoo.

Statute
AKERS v. SELLERS 54 N.E.2d 779 (Ind.App.1944) 114 Ind.App. 660 (1944)
This Indiana case involves an action in replevin by John W. Akers against his former wife, Stella Sellers. The controversy at issue was ownership and possession of a Boston bull terrier dog. At the time of the divorce decree, the dog was not part of the property division and was instead left at the marriage domicile in custody of the former wife. Appellant-Akers claimed that legal title and the dog's best interests rested with him and unsuccessfully brought a suit in replevin in the lower court. On appeal, this Court held that there was no sufficient evidence to overturn the lower court's determination. The judgment was affirmed.
Case
Akron ex rel. Christman-Resch v. Akron 825 N.E.2d 189 (Ohio, 2005) 159 Ohio App.3d 673 (2005)

City of Akron, Ohio cat owners filed suit against city, its mayor, and city council president, seeking declaratory judgment that new city code sections, relating to the trapping and euthanization of free-roaming cats, were unconstitutional.  After the Court of Common Pleas, Summit County granted summary judgment to defendants, the cat owners appealed.  The Court of Appeals held that the city's ordinances relating to the trapping and euthanization of free-roaming cats did not violate cat owners' substantive due process rights.  Further, the ordinances which allowed a cat to be euthanized after three business days following the date of impoundment, did not violate cat owners' procedural due process rights or right to equal protection.  Finally, the ordinances, which allowed city to seize free-roaming cats in response to complaints, did not violate the Fourth Amendment and city's actions were covered by sovereign immunity.

Case
AL - Importation, wildlife - 220-2-.26. Restrictions On Possession, Sale, Importation And/Or Release Of Certain Animals And AL ADC 220-2-.26; AL ADC 220-2-.26

This Alabama regulation provides that no person, firm, corporation, partnership, or association shall possess, sell, offer for sale, import, or bring into the state any of the listed species including piranha, mongoose, non-native coyote, fox, black bear, and others. It is also unlawful for any person to have in possession any live, protected wild bird or wild animal or live embryo, eggs, or sperm of these protected wild birds or animals.

Administrative
AL - Animal Shelters - § 3-10-1 to § 3-10-5 Ala. Code 1975 § 3-10-1 to § 3-10-5 This statute defines an animal shelter and describes a monthly report that each animal shelter must compile. Among other things, contents of the report include number of strays, adoptions, health-related issues, and costs incurred by the shelter. This report must be made available to the public, though a reasonable fee is appropriate. There is no cause of action created by this statute. Statute
AL - Assistance Animals - Assistance Animal/Guide Dog Laws Ala.Code 1975 § § 21-7-1 - 10; 3-1-7; § 32-5A-220; § 24-8A-1 - 5 AL ST § 21-7-1 - 10; § 3-1-7; § 32-5A-220; § 24-8A-1 - 5

The following statutes comprise the state's relevant assistance animal and guide dog laws.

Statute
AL - Bear Protection - Legislative findings. Prohibited activities; exceptions; applicability; penalties. Ala. Code 1975 § 9-11-480 - 481 AL ST § 9-11-480 to 481

These Alabama statutes were signed into law in 2001.  The laws declare that black bears are a species that require special protection in the state and make it illegal to hunt, wound, injure, kill, trap, collect, or capture a black bear, or to attempt to engage in that conduct during the closed season for black bear.  It also makes it illegal to sell or purchase bear parts.

Statute
AL - Cruelty - Alabama Consolidated Cruelty Statutes Ala. Code 1975 § 13A-11-14 - 16; § 13A-11-240 to 247; § 13A–11–260 to 264; § 13A-12-4 - 6; § 3-1-8 to 29; § 2-15-110 to 114 AL ST § 13A-11-14 to 16; § 13A-11-240 to 247; § 13A–11–260 to 264; § 13A-12-4 - 6; § 3-1-8 to 29; § 2-15-110 to 114

These Alabama provisions contain the state's anti-cruelty laws.  The first section (under Article 1 of Chapter 11) provides that a person commits a Class A misdemeanor if he or she subjects any animal to cruel mistreatment, neglect (as long as he or she has custody of the animal), or kills or injures without good cause any animal belonging to another. However, if any person intentionally or knowingly violates Section 13A-11-14, and the act of cruelty or neglect involved the infliction of torture to the animal, that person has committed an act of aggravated cruelty and is guilty of a Class C felony.  The next section (Article 11 of Chapter 11 entitled, "Cruelty to Cats and Dogs"), provides that a person commits the crime of cruelty to a dog or cat in the first degree if he or she intentionally tortures any dog or cat or skins a domestic dog or cat or offers for sale or exchange or offers to buy or exchange the fur, hide, or pelt of a domestic dog or cat. Cruelty to a dog or cat in the first degree is a Class C felony.

Statute
AL - Cruelty - Article 10. Bestiality Ala. Code 1975 § 13A-6-220 - 221 AL ST § 13A-6-220 - 221

This Alabama section enacted in 2014 prohibits people from knowingly engaging in or submitting to any sexual conduct or sexual contact with an animal. The law also prohibits the furtherance of such activity or permitting any sexual conduct or sexual contact with an animal upon premises under his or her control. Violation is a Class A misdemeanor.

Statute
AL - Disaster Planning - Emergency Support Function (ESF) # 16 Veterinarian Services and Animal Care Alabama Emergency Operations Plan (2012) Alabama's Emergency Management Agency coordinates the Emergency Operations Plan, which contains Emergency Support Function (ESF) #11 on Agriculture and Natural Resources. According to that ESF, "[t]he primary purpose of this ESF is to identify animal and agriculture needs in the aftermath of a disaster or emergency. This includes coordinating industry responses to emergencies and providing subject matter experts in all areas of agriculture. Providing necessary leadership and resources for sheltering of animals during times of disasters is another primary responsibility of this ESF, to include coordination with industry stakeholders and organizations that can provide support." Administrative

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