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AK - Veterinary - Chapter 98. Veterinarians. AS § 08.98.010 to 250 AK ST § 08.98.010 to 250

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

Statute
AK - Veterinary immunity - § 09.65.097. Civil liability for emergency veterinary care AS § 09.65.097 AK ST § 09.65.097

This Alaska law provides that a licensed veterinarian who renders emergency care to an injured or ill animal that reasonably appears to need emergency care to avoid serious harm or death is not liable for civil damages as a result of an act or omission in rendering emergency aid. This section does not apply to service rendered at the request of an owner of the animal and does not preclude liability for civil damages as a result of gross negligence or reckless or intentional misconduct.

Statute
AL - Lien, vet - § 35-11-390. Lien declared Ala. Code 1975 § 35-11-390 - 391 AL ST § 35-11-390 - 391

This Alabama section relates to veterinary liens. The law states that every licensed veterinarian has a lien on every animal kept, fed, treated or surgically treated or operated on by him or her while in his or her custody and under contract with the owner of such animal. This lien is for payment of the veterinarian's charges for keeping, feeding, treating or surgically treating or operating on such animal, and the vet has the right to retain such animal until said charges are paid.

Statute
AL - Veterinarian Issues -Professional Rules of Conduct AL ADC 930-X-1-.10 Ala. Admin. Code r. 930-X-1-.10 The following regulations represent the rules for professional conduct expected from Alabama veterinarians, including grounds for disciplinary action. Administrative
AL - Veterinary - Chapter 29. Veterinarians. Ala. Code 1975 § 34-29-1 - 135 AL ST § 34-29-1 to 135

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

Statute
Animal Hospital of Elmont, Inc. v. Gianfrancisco 418 N.Y.S.2d 992 (N.Y.Dist.Ct., 1979) 100 Misc.2d 406 (N.Y.Dist.Ct., 1979)

In this New York case, defendant presented his puppy to plaintiff-animal hospital for treatment. After discussions between about the cost of the care, defendant apparently felt that he would not be allowed to retrieve the puppy from the hospital's possession. As a consequence, plaintiff sent a letter to defendant describing the balance owed, and stating that the hospital would retain the puppy for 10 more days after which it would "take care of the dog in accordance with the legal methods available to dispose of abandoned dogs." The issue on appeal is whether this letter qualified as noticed required by the Agriculture and Markets Act, Sec. 331. The court found that it did not comply with the statutory requirements and thus, plaintiff was responsible for defendant's loss of his puppy valued at $200 at trial. Plaintiff was entitled to a judgment on its complaint for the costs of care amounting to $309.

Case
Anzalone v. Kragness 826 N.E.2d 472 (Ill. 2005) 292 Ill. Dec. 331 (2005)

A woman whose cat was attacked while being boarded at veterinarian's office brought claims against veterinarian and animal hospital.  Trial court dismissed claim for intentional infliction of emotional distress and the Court of Appeals reversed holding dismissal was not warranted. 

Case
AR - Veterinary - Veterinary Practice Code A.C.A. § 17-101-101 - 316 AR ST § 17-101-101 to 316

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

Statute
AZ - Veterinary - Chapter 21. Veterinarians. A. R. S. § 32-2201 - 2296 AZ ST § 32-2201 - 2296

These are the state's veterinary practice laws.  Among the provisions include licensing requirements, laws concerning the state veterinary board, veterinary records laws, and the laws governing disciplinary actions for impaired or incompetent practitioners.

Statute
Bailment and Veterinary Malpractice: Doctrinal Exclusivity, of Not? Katie J.L. Scott 55 Hastings L.J. 1009 (March, 2004)

This Note argues that treating bailment and veterinary malpractice as mutually exclusive is neither necessary nor desirable. In doing so, it first gives an overview of animals' status as property, the doctrine of bailment, and veterinary malpractice. Second, the seminal case discrediting bailment in favor of veterinary malpractice, Price v. Brown, [FN6] is discussed. Finally, this Note explores the reasons why bailment and veterinary malpractice should not be treated as mutually exclusive, and why pet owners should be able to recover for negligence by a veterinarian under the doctrine of bailment.

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