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Detailed Discussion of Great Apes under the Endangered Species Act Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center This paper first examines the historical listing of Great Apes under the Endangered Species Act, including the “split listing” of chimpanzees. It then analyzes how the listing status of Great Apes limits their use in various situations such as private possession, scientific research, and entertainment. Finally, the paper discusses the applicable provisions of CITES that restrict the international trade in Great Apes. Article
Detailed Discussion of Hawaii Great Ape Laws Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center In Hawaii, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, and gibbons are heavily regulated because of their dual status as both endangered/threatened species and restricted animals.The following discussion begins with a general overview of the various state statutes and regulations affecting Great Apes. It then analyzes the applicability of those laws to the possession and use of apes for specific purposes, including their possession as pets, for scientific research, for commercial purposes, and in sanctuaries. Article
Detailed Discussion of Idaho Great Ape Laws Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center In Idaho, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, gibbons, and all other nonhuman primates are classified as “deleterious exotic animals” which are dangerous to the environment, livestock, agriculture, or wildlife of the state. As a result of this classification, it is illegal to import or possess an ape without a Deleterious Exotic Animal permit issued by the Idaho State Department of Agriculture (ISDA). The following discussion begins with a general overview of the various state statutes and regulations affecting Great Apes. It then analyzes the applicability of those laws to the possession and use of apes for specific purposes, including their possession as pets, for scientific research, for commercial purposes, and in sanctuaries. Article
Detailed Discussion of Illinois Great Apes Laws Hanna V. Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center

This article discusses the state laws that govern the import, possession, use, and treatment of Great Apes in Illinois. As of January 1, 2011, the possession of Great Apes is banned in Illinois. However, circuses, zoos, and other exhibitors, research facilities, and animal refuges are exempt from the ban. Those exempt facilities are not required to obtain state permits to possess or display apes.

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Detailed Discussion of Indiana Great Ape Laws Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center In Indiana, the importation, possession, and sale of certain species of apes are restricted under the state’s Endangered Species laws, the Department of Natural Resources’ (DNR) Exotic Mammal rules, or both. The following discussion begins with a general overview of the state statutes and regulations affecting Great Apes. It then applies those laws to the possession and use of apes for specific purposes, including their possession as pets, for scientific research, for commercial purposes, and in sanctuaries. Because of the issues highlighted throughout the discussion, there is a high degree of uncertainty in the interpretation and application of Indiana’s laws and regulations as applied to Great Apes. Article
Detailed Discussion of Iowa Great Ape Laws Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center In 2007, Iowa passed the Dangerous Wild Animals Act (DWA) which classifies all Great Apes as “dangerous wild animals” and restricts the purposes for which they may be imported or possessed.The following discussion begins with a general overview of the various state statutes and regulations affecting Great Apes. It then analyzes the applicability of those laws to the possession and use of apes for specific purposes, including their possession as pets, for scientific research, for commercial purposes, and in sanctuaries. Article
Detailed Discussion of Kansas Great Ape Laws Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center In Kansas, it is legal for anyone to import, possess, buy, and sell any species of ape for any purpose. There are no state permit or registration requirements for gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, or gibbons; however, those species are protected under the Federal Endangered Species Act, and activities involving those animals may require federal permits.The following discussion begins with a general overview of the various state statutes and regulations affecting Great Apes. It then analyzes the applicability of those laws to the possession and use of apes for specific purposes, including their possession as pets, for scientific research, for commercial purposes, and in sanctuaries. Article
Detailed Discussion of Kentucky Great Ape Laws Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center In Kentucky, all chimpanzees, gorillas, bonobos, orangutans, and gibbons are classified as “inherently dangerous” exotic wildlife by the Department of Fish and Wildlife Resources (DFWR). The following discussion begins with a general overview of the various state statutes and regulations affecting Great Apes. It then analyzes the applicability of those laws to the possession and use of apes for specific purposes, including their possession as pets, for scientific research, for commercial purposes, and in sanctuaries. Article
Detailed Discussion of Louisiana Great Ape Laws Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center According to the Louisiana Wildlife and Fisheries Commission (LWFC), the possession of certain nonhuman primates “poses significant hazards to public safety and health,” and “is detrimental to the welfare of the animals.” The following discussion begins with a general overview of the various state statutes and regulations affecting Great Apes. It then analyzes the applicability of those laws to the possession and use of apes for specific purposes, including their possession as pets, for scientific research, for commercial purposes, and in sanctuaries. Article
Detailed Discussion of Maine Great Ape Laws Elizabeth Love Marcero Animal Legal & Historical Center The following article discusses Maine Great Ape law. While Maine does not ban the private possession of great apes, the state only issues licenses to keep apes to a select few. The state of Maine controls possession and importation of great apes under its exotic pet law and accompanying regulations.Private possession of great apes in the state is allowed but quite limited. However, state law and accompanying regulations clearly allow the use of apes and other wild animals in exhibitions, wildlife rehabilitation, and research facilities. While these regulations specifically address the caging requirements for great apes, enforcement and inspection provisions are vague. As is true with many states, there is not an overall law that directly addresses the possession of apes or the specific needs of apes in captivity. Article

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