Results

Displaying 71 - 80 of 374
Titlesort descending Author Citation Summary Type
Detailed Discussion of Connecticut Great Ape Laws Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center Under Section 26-40a of Connecticut’s Fisheries and Game Law, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos, and orangutans are classified as “potentially dangerous animals” which may not be possessed by the general public. All federally licensed or registered exhibitors and research facilities are exempt from the ban; however, the Connecticut Department of Environmental Protection (DEP) prohibits the importation of potentially dangerous apes by many exhibitors (except zoos, nature centers, and municipal parks).The following discussion begins with a general overview of the various state statutes and regulations affecting Great Apes. It then analyzes the applicability of those laws to the possession and use of apes for specific purposes, including their possession as pets, for scientific research, for commercial purposes, and in sanctuaries. Article
Detailed Discussion of D.C. Great Ape Laws Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center Washington D.C. does not have any statutes or regulations that specifically address Great Apes. Instead, the District has a blanket ban on all animals that are not specifically exempt by statute. Because they are not exempt from the ban, it is illegal to import, possess, and sell gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, and gibbons within the municipality. The following discussion begins with a general overview of the various state statutes and regulations affecting Great Apes. It then analyzes the applicability of those laws to the possession and use of apes for specific purposes, including their possession as pets, for scientific research, for commercial purposes, and in sanctuaries. Article
Detailed Discussion of Delaware Great Ape Laws Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center In Delaware, the importation, possession, and sale of apes are governed by the state’s Endangered Species laws and the Exotic Animal laws. The following discussion begins with a general overview of the various state statutes and regulations affecting Great Apes. It then analyzes the applicability of those laws to the possession and use of apes for specific purposes, including their possession as pets, for scientific research, for commercial purposes, and in sanctuaries. Article
Detailed Discussion of Florida Great Ape Laws Hanna V. Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center

This article discusses the state laws that govern the import, possession, use, and treatment of Great Apes in Florida. In general, a state permit is required to import or possess apes. The state does not issue permits to keep apes as pets; however, individuals who possessed apes prior to the 1980 ban may be permitted to keep those apes for the remainder of the animals’ lives. The state does issue permits to import and possess apes for commercial or scientific uses to applicants who are qualified by age and experience and who have appropriate facilities. Permittees must comply with stringent legal requirements for the housing, care, maintenance, and use of apes. Also included within the article are local ordinances which have been enacted by counties and municipalities to restrict or regulate Great Apes within political subdivisions of the state.

Article
Detailed Discussion of Georgia Great Ape Laws Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center According to the Georgia legislature, the importation, transportation, sale, transfer, and possession of an ape (or any other wild animal) is a privilege, not a right.[1] Under the state’s Wild Animals Law, that privilege will not be granted unless “it can be clearly demonstrated” that those actions will not “pose unnecessary risk to Georgia’s wildlife and other natural resources or to the citizens of and visitors to this state.”[2] All species of apes are classified as “inherently dangerous” animals and as a result are among the most heavily regulated animals in the state.The following discussion begins with a general overview of the various state statutes and regulations affecting Great Apes. It then analyzes the applicability of those laws to the possession and use of apes for specific purposes, including their possession as pets, for scientific research, for commercial purposes, and in sanctuaries. The discussion concludes with a compilation of local ordinances which govern the possession and use of apes within geographic subdivisions of the state. Article
Detailed Discussion of Great Apes under the AWA Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center This paper first addresses the need for protection of Great Apes by the Animal Welfare Aact (AWA), and the method by which they are afforded that protection. It then identifies and analyzes the types of activities that are regulated under the AWA, including commercial trade, exhibition, scientific research, and transportation. The Act requires that apes possessed for any of those purposes are maintained pursuant to certain minimum standards of care. Those standards are outlined and explained in Section IV. While APHIS is ultimately responsible for enforcing the AWA and USDA regulations, the agency does not have exclusive regulatory authority over apes used for those purposes. In addition to a variety of other federal laws, all regulated facilities must comply with all state and local laws governing the import, possession, use, and treatment of apes. The final portion of this paper analyzes the effect that the AWA has on those state and local laws. Article
Detailed Discussion of Great Apes under the CHIMP Act Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center The following discussion outlines key events from the recent past that led to the surplus of chimpanzees in U.S. research facilities and the actions that the government has taken to reduce the number of chimpanzees that are maintained in those facilities. The remainder of the discussion provides a detailed analysis of the Chimpanzee Health Improvement, Maintenance, and Protection Act and an overview of the current status of the national chimpanzee sanctuary system. Article
Detailed Discussion of Great Apes under the Endangered Species Act Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center This paper first examines the historical listing of Great Apes under the Endangered Species Act, including the “split listing” of chimpanzees. It then analyzes how the listing status of Great Apes limits their use in various situations such as private possession, scientific research, and entertainment. Finally, the paper discusses the applicable provisions of CITES that restrict the international trade in Great Apes. Article
Detailed Discussion of Hawaii Great Ape Laws Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center In Hawaii, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, and gibbons are heavily regulated because of their dual status as both endangered/threatened species and restricted animals.The following discussion begins with a general overview of the various state statutes and regulations affecting Great Apes. It then analyzes the applicability of those laws to the possession and use of apes for specific purposes, including their possession as pets, for scientific research, for commercial purposes, and in sanctuaries. Article
Detailed Discussion of Idaho Great Ape Laws Hanna Coate Animal Legal & Historical Center In Idaho, gorillas, chimpanzees, bonobos, orangutans, gibbons, and all other nonhuman primates are classified as “deleterious exotic animals” which are dangerous to the environment, livestock, agriculture, or wildlife of the state. As a result of this classification, it is illegal to import or possess an ape without a Deleterious Exotic Animal permit issued by the Idaho State Department of Agriculture (ISDA). The following discussion begins with a general overview of the various state statutes and regulations affecting Great Apes. It then analyzes the applicability of those laws to the possession and use of apes for specific purposes, including their possession as pets, for scientific research, for commercial purposes, and in sanctuaries. Article

Pages